All posts by Emily Nonko

Emily is a Brooklyn-based writer who has covered New York City real estate, architecture and design for Brownstoner, The Wall Street Journal, Dwell and other publications. You can follow her on Twitter @EmilyNonko.

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper West Side 

390 west end avenue, Apthorp, upper west side, condo, corcoran

At one of the Upper West Side’s most historic apartment houses, this four-bedroom spread has undergone a fresh modern revamp. The 3,069-square-foot apartment comes from the Apthorp, a condo built in 1908 for William Waldorf Astor. This apartment belongs to a designer couple, who oversaw the reno but maintained prewar details like fireplaces, moldings and wood floors. They gave the historic interiors pops of color, plus modern amenities. After selling in 2015 for $5.5 million, it’s asking $7.75 million after the flip.

Look around

affordable housing, Bronx

shipping containers, affordable housing, sg blocks

Shipping container construction, courtesy SG Blocks

A developer is getting creative in his latest affordable housing project in the Bronx. Gold Key Group, which typically develops market-rate housing, teamed up with SG Blocks, a shipping container company, to build 65 to 75 apartments above a retail store and a church. SG Blocks will use shipping containers due to the affordability and quick construction time–the method cuts the building timeline by 40 percent and is 10 to 20 percent less expensive than typical construction, according to Paul Galvin, CEO of SG Blocks. And as amNew York reports, Galvin “hopes this type of construction will become a solution to the housing crisis.”

Get more details

Cool Listings, Financial District, Interiors

Liberty Tower, 55 Liberty Street, penthouse, attic, brown harris stevens

This full-floor penthouse is located within the former attic of one of New York’s early skyscrapers, the Liberty Tower. Built at 55 Liberty Street in 1909 by Chicago architect Henry Ives Cobb, the Gothic Revival-style office building was the tallest in the world when completed. It was home to FDR’s law offices and, later, to German spies plotting to prevent American from joining WWI. Architect Joseph Pell Lombardi converted the tower to co-ops in 1979, with the attic unit retaining vaulted ceilings, exposed beams, and 29 windows offering views across the city. It’s now listed for $2.695 million.

See it up close

Cool Listings, Interiors, Soho

138 grand street, soho, co-op, core nyc, artist loft, soho artist loft

Behold, 2,700 glorious square feet of authentic artist loft, located in the middle of Soho on the corner of Crosby and Grand Streets. The open interior is decked out with soaring 14-foot ceilings, cast iron columns, exposed brick and six massive side-by-side wood framed factory windows. The fashion photographer and filmmaker Greg Kadel purchased the home in 2005 for $1.73 million, according to public records. And now the co-op has been listed for $3.895 million.

Explore inside

affordable housing, Policy

170-174 East Second Street, where Kushner filed false permits, photo via Google Maps

Update 3/22/18: The Daily News reports that the Department of Buildings is investigating more than 12 properties where Kushner Companies is said to have filed false paperwork in relation to rent-regulated tenants. Kushner Cos. has denied the allegations and said yesterday they are the victims of “politically motivated attacks.”

Controversies continue to pile up for Kushner Companies, the Manhattan development firm led by Jared Kushner until he left last year for the White House. Besides the major financial troubles of their office tower 666 Fifth Avenue, the firm was caught routinely filing false paperwork with the city, “declaring it had zero rent-regulated tenants in dozens of buildings it owned across the city when, in fact, it had hundreds,” according to the AP. Housing Rights Initiative, a New York tenants’ rights watchdog, compiled the work permit application documents. Aaron Carr, the founder, called the act “bare-faced greed,” adding that “the fact that the company was falsifying all these applications with the government shows a sordid attempt to avert accountability and get a rapid return on its investment.”

It happened at least 80 times

Celebrities, Greenwich Village, Interiors, Recent Sales

105 West 11th Street, Keith McNally, Cool listings, Greenwich Village, Interiors, celebrities, celebrity chef, kitchens, manhattan townhouse for sale,

After a long run on the market–renting at $25,000/month, $19,000/month, then listed for $13.95 million–restaurateur Keith McNally‘s 4,600 square-foot Greek Revival townhouse has sold. According to The Real Deal, an unknown buyer paid $10.3 million. McNally, behind buzzy establishments like Balthazar, Cherche Midi, Odeon, Café Luxembourg, Schiller’s and Minetta Tavern, bought the 1842 townhouse at 105 West 11th Street in 2000. The design is fit for a restaurateur, with a stunning kitchen, walk-in wine cellar and rustic French-country interiors.

Take one last look inside

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Interiors, lincoln square

robert lowell, 15 west 67th street, central park west studios, co-op, halstead

It doesn’t get much more romantic than living in an apartment off Central Park once used by a famous poet as his writing studio. That’s the case here at 15 West 67th Street, the historic Lincoln Square cooperative that poet Robert Lowell once used as his writing atelier. Lowell worked in here during his time in New York, prior to his 1972 move to England. As the years passed, of course, the one bedroom was mostly renovated, selling in 2012 for $712,000 and hitting the market again for $1.185 million. According to the listing, the current owner “fondly brought back the luster of the woodwork,” while adding wine storage and other modern amenities.

See it all

Landmarks Preservation Commission, maps

This January, the Landmarks Preservation Commission released a series of amendments that would overhaul how the commission reviews certain applications–with the idea to cut down the time it takes to approve routine applications. And later this month, on Tuesday, March 27th, the Commission will hold a public hearing on how these changes would affect the city’s landmark process. In advance of the meeting, the Municipal Art Society of New York created a pair of interactive maps to better inform New Yorkers on the LPC’s process. One map, the Commission Review Map, shows what type of alterations have been permitted or denied by the full LPC commission. The other, the Staff Review Map, shows what type of alterations have been permitted by the LPC staff or withdrawn by the applicant. As MAS puts it, “We hope these maps help bring to light how the LPC fulfills its ‘purpose of safeguarding the buildings and places that represent New York City’s cultural, social, economic, political, and architectural history’ through regulation.”

Get the details

Cool Listings, Crown Heights, Historic Homes, Interiors

susan b. elkins house, elkins house, 1375 dean street, crown heights, compass

Crown Heights oldest home–long considered a neighborhood eyesore–has undergone a complete transformation. The Susan B. Elkins House is a circa-1850s wood frame at 1375 Dean Street, and the only home in the neighborhood that dates back to when the area was rural. In later years, the individual landmark fell into serious disrepair, only to be purchased in 2014 for a condo conversion. Now it’s ready for residents after a complete and total renovation overseen by nC2 Architecture and Komaru Enterprises. The house has been split into four duplex units, ranging from 2,000 to 2,600 square feet. Two have just hit the market, with the eye-popping price tags of $2.3 and $2.7 million.

The interior was gutted

Clinton Hill, Cool Listings, Interiors

313 clinton avenue, halloween, corcoran, Janna Kennedy Hyten

Brooklynites know and love Janna Kennedy Hyten, the Halloween Queen of Clinton Hill. For over 20 years, she hosted a spooky bash known as Halloween 313 right outside her historic townhouse. Sadly, the performance has come to an end and Kennedy Hyten has gone ahead and listed her home –a duplex on the lower floors–for sale. The gorgeous spread, with tons of historic details intact, is asking $2.65 million.

See the not-so-spooky interior

Archtober

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