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Major Developments, Staten Island

new york wheel staten island

Despite controversy, several delays, and a $30 million crowdfunding attempt, the New York Wheel is projecting major first-year revenue. According to The Real Deal, developers of the 630-foot Staten Island ferris wheel expect to bring in a staggering $127.85 million in 2017, a figure that will make it more lucrative than the Empire State Building’s observation deck, which raked in $111.5 million last year. Of the total revenue, $96 million is projected to come from admission fees (which come in at $35 a person, as compared to the Empire State Building’s $32); $10 million from sponsorships; and $8.7 million from gift shop sales. And if you’re impressed by these numbers, annual revenue will likely grow to $166.52 million by 2021!

Find out more

Major Developments, real estate trends, Staten Island

staten island brooklyn

It’s only a matter of time before Staten Island gets pinned as the next Brooklyn. As new developments pop up along the northern tip, the oft-forgotten borough is seeing the tides turn in its favor. Today the Times ran a piece on some of the biggest projects coming to the island, and unlike those popping up in Manhattan, this bunch is far more focused on livability and community building. Moreover, with rooftop beehives, shared vegetable gardens, small-batch espresso, pet spas, artisanal shops shilling specialty olive oils, and cheese caves in the pipeline, Staten Island is also starting to sound a lot like some of the city’s most hipster-run areas. In fact, in casting its net for local testimonials, the Times was able to find Ridgewood and Bushwick refugees that have already high-tailed it southwest. And it’s no wonder, with real estate being offered at just a fraction of the price—one couple in the story closed on a house with “numerous porches and six bedrooms, for $620,000″—it’s only a matter of time before we turn to our significant others and say, “Let’s move to Staten Island!”

More on Staten Island’s next steps here

Architecture, Staten Island

new york wheel staten island

Hold on to your hats, folks! After countless delays, the New York Wheel is finally back on track. Architizer reports that workers are gearing up to break ground tomorrow, April 16th, on what is slated to become the world’s tallest observation wheel. Providing panoramic views of New York Harbor and the cityscape beyond, the 630-foot wheel located at the tip of St. George on northern Staten Island is primed to become one of the most epic ways to experience New York City.

FInd out more on the cost and admission here

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Quirky Homes, Staten Island

2475 Richmond Road, haunted Staten Island mansion, Egbertville

For many New Yorkers, living on Staten Island is scary enough (just kidding!), but for those looking for an extra thrill, a historic, landmarked haunted mansion just hit the market for $2.31 million.

The 7,700-square-foot, 10-bedroom Italianate villa-style home is located at 2475 Richmond Road in Egbertville and is known as the Gustav Mayer House for its original owner, an inventor who created the recipe for Nabisco’s Nilla Wafers. Built in 1885, the house served as a Grey Gardens-esque residence for Mayer’s two daughters, who stayed sequestered inside until their 100th birthdays. It’s said that their ghosts still roam the hallways, along with the presence of their father, according to the Post.

Get the full story here

Featured Story

Features, Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Staten Island, Urban Design

Living Breakwaters, SCAPE, Kate Orff, Oysters, Tottenville, Rebuild by Design, Staten Island, Ecology,

Image courtesy of SCAPE / LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PLLC

We know what you’re thinking: what is oyster-tecture, anyway? Just ask Kate Orff, landscape architect and the founding principal of SCAPE Studio. SCAPE is a landscape architecture and urban design office based in Manhattan and specializing in urban ecology, site design, and strategic planning. Kate is also an associate professor of architecture and urban design at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, where she founded the Urban Landscape Lab, which is dedicated to affecting positive social and ecological change in the joint built-natural environment.

But the Living Breakwaters project may be the SCAPE team’s most impactful yet. The “Oyster-tecture” concept was developed as part of the MoMA Rising Currents Exhibition in 2010, with the idea of an oyster hatchery/eco-park in the Gowanus interior that would eventually generate a wave-attenuating reef in the Gowanus Bay. Describing the project as, “a process for generating new cultural and environmental narratives,” Kate envisioned a new “reef culture” functioning both as ecological sanctuary and public recreation space.

Find out more about what oysters and other creatures can do for NYC

Featured Story

Features, Getting Away, holidays

santas village north pole new york

Anyone with kids knows that there’s no such thing as too much when it comes to the sensory wonders of the holiday season. We’ve rounded up some Santa-centric events—from lap-climbing photo-ops to full-on wonderland to brunch with the holiday’s most famous man—that aim to satisfy endless appetites for holiday cheer. We’ve even got a couple for your pets!

This way to the North Pole…

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Staten Island

110 Longfellow Avenue, Vito Corleone, Godfather House, Todt Hill

“I’m gonna make him an offer he can’t refuse.” It worked for the Corleones, so it might work for you. That is, if you want to own the Staten Island home that stood in as the exterior of Don Corleone’s residence in “The Godfather.”

The Todt Hill mini-mansion at 110 Longfellow Avenue hit the market last week for $2,895,000. Film buffs will clearly recall the house from the famous opening wedding scene, and thankfully not much has changed on the exterior since.

Check out the entire house

Major Developments, Staten Island

New York Wheel, Staten Island Ferris Wheel

If Staten Islanders have felt left out of the subway rat race all these years, they’ll soon be able to get in on the action without leaving their home borough. The developers of the massive New York Wheel–the 60-story Ferris Wheel on the Staten Island waterfront set to become the tallest observation wheel in the world–have announced that a simulated subway ride will be part of the waterfront complex.

Time Train, as it’s officially being called, will be a 4-D theater experience that will provide a visual tour of New York’s history with a focus on the harbor. Additionally, a webcam will be installed on the nearby Robbins Reef lighthouse to offer a 24-hour look at construction of the wheel, which will boast four mobile bar cars and a 20-seat restaurant. Groundbreaking for the wheel and its neighboring attractions–including a floating swimming complex, a hotel, and a large outlet mall–is set for 2015 with completion planned for 2017. To see more new developments happening on Staten Island, click here.

[Via Crain’s]

Major Developments, Polls, Staten Island

POLL: Will Freshkills Transform Staten Island?

By Dana Schulz, Wed, October 1, 2014

Last week, we interviewed Eloise Hirsh, the Freshkills Park Administrator about her role in transforming 2,200 acres of reclaimed land at the former Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island, the largest landfill-to-park conversion in the world to date. Though it won’t be entirely completed until 2035, Staten Islanders are already visiting the park and enjoying its many amenities. And while of course those who live in the borough will continue to take advantage of this new development, we want to know if you think it will transform Staten Island as a whole, making it a desirable destination for all New Yorkers.

Featured Story

Features, Interviews, Landscape Architecture, New Yorker Spotlight, People, Staten Island, Urban Design

Eloise Hirsch, Freshkills Park

Similar to Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux’s grand ideas for Central Park, there is a vision for the 2,200 acres of reclaimed land at the former Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island. Where trash once piled up for as far as the eye could see, the site is now a blossoming park full of wildlife and recreational activities.

The Park Administrator overseeing this incredible transformation is Eloise Hirsh. Eloise is a major force behind the largest landfill-to-park conversion in the world to date. In her role as Freshkills Park Administrator, she makes sure the park progresses towards its completion date in 2035, and regularly engages with New Yorkers to keep them informed and excited.

6sqft recently spoke with Eloise to learn more about Fresh Kills’ history, what it takes to reclaim land, and what New Yorkers can expect at the park today and in the years to come.

Read the full interview here

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