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Carroll Gardens, Interiors, Recent Sales

Bright and Sunny Carroll Gardens Townhouse Sells for $2M

By Annie Doge, Mon, September 22, 2014

297 Hoyt Street, Christine Chen, Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn brownstone

Bright, beautiful, and boasting plenty of space, one lucky buyer just scooped up this stunning townhouse at 297 Hoyt Street in Carroll Gardens for $2,175,500, according to city records released today. The brownstone home is currently configured in a two-family setup, but can easily be converted to one, adding an additional 1,300 square feet to the already spacious footprint. And with a private garden, full basement, and lots of original details, it will likely be hard for this home’s new owner not to keep the entire townhouse to themselves.

Take a look inside

Featured Story

Book Reviews, City Living, DUMBO, Features, History

dumbo 1925 waterfront, historic dumbo, historic dumbo waterfront, dumbo 1900s, dumbo empire stores historic

There’s been a lot of novels set in New York City (guilty myself, two times). When done right, such work can serve as a portal to the past, when New York was a distinctly different place, one often defined by its era and often in direct contrast to the current conditions.

In Eamon Loingsigh’s powerful new novel, Light of the Diddicoy, reference is made in the very first line to the area “Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass.” Of course, any New Yorker worth his/her salted caramel custard from Shake Shack knows DUMBO, the Brooklyn nabe known for its pricey lofts and tony boutiques, its art galleries and swank eateries and a grassy park that sprawls along the water’s edge below the span of East River bridges. Lovely. The characters in Loingsigh’s novel aren’t so privileged, for they lived in DUMBO 100 years ago, long before any clunky acronyms, when the waterfront was a war zone, and the novel’s narrator, Liam Garrity, a displaced and desperate Irish immigrant, all of 14 years, fell in with a brutal gang as a matter of survival.

More about ‘Light of the Diddicoy’ here

Featured Story

City Living, Features

The Local Yokel Trap of New York City

By Andrew Cotto, Wed, May 14, 2014

chicken

As a Brooklynite surrounded by progressives, I’m well aware of the need to “think globally and act locally” on a whole lot of matters. This persistent mantra seems particularly true when it comes to commerce, prompting those of us who heed such calls to shop (and generally pay more) at farmer’s markets and mom & pop retailers, especially those in our very own neighborhood. This is how vital local businesses can be sustained in an environment rife with soulless, big chain predators. OK. Fine. So I do my part by forking over ten bucks to a farmer for a bunch of kale and a handful of carrots, though I can’t understand why it costs more to buy the stuff direct from the guy who grew it himself. And then there was the time a Hudson Valley hipster tried to sell me a three pound chicken for $27.

“What was it,” I asked. “Raised on truffles?”

 
Read more of Andrew’s story here

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Carroll Gardens, City Living, Features

Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, NYC irony, Alanis Morissette, David Foster Wallace, food, restaurants, Brooklyn parking, Brooklyn crowding, The Warriors, NYCsubways

David Foster Wallace is credited with predicting way back in the mid-90s that excessive irony would lead to the ruin of our culture. Around that same time, Alanis Morissette had her own far less erudite and flawed take on irony, which went a little something like this:

“It’s like rain on your wedding day
A free ride when you already paid
Some good advice that you just didn’t take…”

With all due respect to the prescience of DFW, life for me — at least these days in my Brooklyn neighborhood of Carroll Gardens — far more resembles Alanis Morissette’s screwy version of irony.

6sqft’s Andrew Cotto — an author of two novels and a journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, Men’s Journal, and Salon.com — will be sharing his experiences as he makes his way around New York City. This week, he describes life in Carroll Gardens.

Carroll Gardens. Isn’t it Ironic?

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