Pacific Park Brooklyn

affordable housing, Brooklyn, Policy

Pacific Park Brooklyn, Atlantic Yards, Pacific Park master plan, Greenland Forest City Partners, Thomas Balsley Associates

In every state and major city in the country, extremely low-income renters face a shortage of affordable housing. Although low-income applicants in New York City display a higher need for affordable housing, policies created by Mayor de Blasio and his administration continue to set aside more units for middle-income applicants. In a detailed report, City Limits analyzed affordable housing in Brooklyn and compared the need for affordable housing to the actual number of allotted low-income and middle-income units. For just one building, the tower at 535 Carlton, nearly 95,000 households entered the lottery for its “100 percent affordable” units. However, only 2,203 applicants were eligible for the 148 middle-income units, and over 67,000 households applied for the 90 low-income units. The data shows low-income households in search of affordable housing face much tougher odds than middle-income applicants.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, New Developments, Prospect Heights, Rentals

Last spring, the first housing lottery opened at Pacific Park Brooklyn when 181 affordable units at SHoP’s 461 Dean Street (the world’s tallest modular tower) came online. It was followed a few months later by 298 openings at 535 Carlton Avenue, COOKFOX‘s entirely affordable building, and now the third set of apartments for low- to middle-income New Yorkers is open. SHoP Architects also designed an all-affordable building at 38 Sixth Avenue, adjacent to the Barclays Center, and as of today these 303 residences are up for grabs, ranging from $532/month studios to $3,695/month three-bedrooms. Households earning between 101 and 165 percent of the area media income (or up to $173,415 annually) are eligible for 198 of the units, while 105 units are set aside for those earning between 30 and 100 percent (as low as $20,126 a year).

More details and the whole qualification breakdown

Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn, Fort Greene

461 Dean Street, B2 Tower, Pacific Park

Image via Field Condition

After boasting that it had “cracked the code” on modular construction, with plans for a Brooklyn factory, developer Forest City Ratner is exiting the prefab building business, reports the New York Times. The factory at the Brooklyn Navy Yard will be sold to Roger Krulak, a former Forest City executive, along with the technology used to construct the world’s tallest prefabricated steel structure, the 32-story 461 Dean Street in the Pacific Park complex in Brooklyn. Construction on the building has just been completed and 461 Dean is weeks from getting its first residents.

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Celebrities, Prospect Heights

Things are heating up over at Pacific Park Brooklyn, the 22-acre Prospect Heights site anchored by the Barclays Center and containing eight million square feet of mixed-use development. Last month, an affordable housing lottery kicked off for 300 units at the COOKFOX-designed 535 Carlton Avenue, and now the architects’ other residential building at 550 Vanderbilt Avenue is making celebrity headlines.

The Post reports that Oscar-winning actress Lupita Nyong’o was looking at apartments in the 17-story luxury condo, specifically a $2.89 million three-bedroom, corner unit.

Get the scoop on her potential purchase

affordable housing, housing lotteries, New Developments, Prospect Heights, Rentals

It’s been almost two years since architects COOKFOX were selected by developer Greenland Forest City Partners to design two residential buildings at their Pacific Park Brooklyn project, the 22-acre site anchored by the Barclays Center and containing eight million square feet of mixed-use development. COOKFOX took the helm for 550 Vanderbilt Avenue, a 275-unit condo, and 535 Carlton Avenue, a 298-unit affordable rental. A housing lottery for the latter will open tomorrow, according to a press release, offering low, moderate and middle-income residents the chance to apply for apartments ranging from $548/month studios to $3,716/month three-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, Downtown Brooklyn, housing lotteries

461 Dean Street, B2 Tower, Pacific Park

Photo of the construction progress at 461 Dean Street in January, via Field Condition

After suffering delays, lawsuits, leaks and alignment issues, Pacific Park’s 461 Dean Street (aka the B2 Tower) is finally wrapping up construction and has just launched its affordable housing lottery. The 32-story structure from SHoP Architects will be the world’s tallest prefab tower, and of its 363 units, 181 will be available to low- and middle-income households. This will range from $559/month studios to $3,012 two-bedrooms and from individuals earning $20,675 annually to families of four earning $144,960.

Get a look at the apartments and find out if you qualify

Architecture, Construction Update, Downtown Brooklyn, Fort Greene, Major Developments

Atlantic Yards B2 Tower

Image via Field Condition

When it was announced that Brooklyn would be host to the world’s tallest prefab tower, many believed that a new era of construction was upon us. Called the B2 Tower, the building would rise as stacked 32-story structure, affording all the perks of a conventional edifice, but be quick and inexpensive to build. But as it has been well-documented, the project, announced way back in 2012, has been a major flop. Stricken with delays and countless lawsuits flying left and right, the building today has only reached about half of its height. So where did things go so wrong? A fascinating piece by the Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report‘s Norman Oder on City Limits provides some incredible insight into the project that has failed to deliver on just about every promise put forward.

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Daily Link Fix

Lil Bub, internet cats
  • A new exhibit at the Museum of the Moving Image explores the online cat phenomenon and why people can’t get enough of characters like Lil Bub. [DNAinfo]
  • Listen to puppet Johnny T’s rendition of “New York, New York.” Perhaps our favorite line is “So what there’s hipsters here. There’s hipsters… everywhere.” [YouTube]
  • The 820 feet of construction walls for Pacific Park Brooklyn will get adorned with ten 10-foot x 40-foot murals. [NYT]
  • Since FAO Schwarz has officially closed, Mary Arnold Toys on the Upper East Side is now the oldest continuously run toy store in the United States. [Village Voice]
  • The South Ferry subway station is the loudest in the city. [NYP]
  • Join the Lower East Side Preservation Initiative for a two-night event celebrating street art and the Lower East Side, which includes a talk by artist Al Diaz. [6sqft inbox]

Images: Lil Bub (L); Mary Arnold Toys (R)

condos, Landscape Architecture, New Developments, Prospect Heights, Urban Design

Pacific Park Brooklyn, Atlantic Yards, Pacific Park master plan, Greenland Forest City Partners, Thomas Balsley Associates

Formerly known as Atlantic Yards, Pacific Park Brooklyn will be a 22-acre site anchored by the Barclays Center in Prospect Heights and containing eight million square feet of mixed-use development that includes 16 condo towers and 2,250 units of affordable housing, as well as an eight-acre park. Almost a year ago, developers Forest City Ratner Companies and Greenland USA (now merged as Greenland Forest City Partners) announced that they’d chosen Thomas Balsley Associates to design the green space. And now, we’re finally seeing the first set of renderings for the public space, in addition to a master plan.

The Daily News first shared the renderings, showing “the long, meandering park, which will follow the footprint of the new towers.” The outdoor space will boast a public plaza and promenade, toddler and children’s play areas, a bocce ball court, basketball court, dog run, glowing lanterns, sloping lawns, and a water garden.

More details ahead

Architecture, Green Design, New Developments

Atlantic Yards B2 Tower

Photo © Field Condition

Prefab housing has taken the world by storm in the last years, lauded for its low cost and flexibility, with buildings ranging from single-family homes to art schools popping up across the globe. But not until Forest City Ratner’s plan for B2 BKLYN have we seen an attempt to build a large-scale module tower topping out at 32-stories—the world’s tallest prefab tower.

It’s well known that the project has been a big flop; construction was far slower than originally projected and was halted in August amidst disputes between the builder, Skansa USA, and the developer, Forest City Ratner. In September lawsuits went flying, both pointing fingers as to why the whole thing failed. Forest City blamed the execution of the plan, while Skanska said the design was flawed. Fast-forward to today, and the work on the tower has been shut down with only 10 stories erected. A recent WSJ article looks at where the whole thing went awry, and more importantly: Is pre-fab construction even feasible at such a scale?

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