MTA

City Living, Transportation

MTA installs free mask dispensers inside buses

By Dana Schulz, Thu, July 30, 2020

Photo: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit

In a continued effort to COVID-proof public transportation, the MTA has installed mask dispensers at the entrance to city buses. The pilot program is now on 100 buses in the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island, and it will expand to 400 buses in all five boroughs by next month. The free surgical mask dispensers–each of which holds 50 masks and will be refilled daily–are mounted at the front door of express buses and at the front and rear doors of SBS and local buses. Masks are required to ride any bus or subway.

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Policy, Transportation

Photo: Patrick Cashin / MTA New York City Transit

In May, for the first time in its history, the New York City subway system shut down overnight as part of a nightly disinfection plan to kill traces of the coronavirus on trains and buses. To ensure the subway resumes 24/7 service, seen as an integral part of the city that never sleeps’ DNA, the State Senate on Thursday passed legislation that would require nonstop subway service when a state of emergency is not in effect.

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Technology, Transportation

Screenshots taken from the MTmta app

Many New Yorkers are having to start heading back to the office, and part of that anxiety is how they get there. For some, that means switching from the subway to the bus in search of more social distance. In fact, the New York Times recently reported that in April and May, bus ridership in NYC was higher than that of the subway for the first time in more than 50 years. And for those making the switch, it just got a lot simpler to feel at ease. The MYmta app now includes real-time data for the number of passengers on an arriving bus.

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Transportation

Photo by Patrick Cashin courtesy of MTA via Flickr

After one year of service disruptions, the much-talked-about L train “slowdown” wrapped up in April. The MTA has now turned its attention to the F train’s Rutgers Tube, which is the last of 11 subway tunnels to be rebuilt after suffering damage from Superstorm Sandy in 2012. Using the same tactics as were employed for the L train, the Rutgers Tube will only be shut down on nights and weekends, affecting F train service from August 2020 through March 2021.

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City Living, Transportation

NYC subway, PPE vending machine

All photos: Marc Herman / MTA NYC Transit on Flickr

As of yesterday, the MTA rolled out 12 PPE vending machines in 10 busy subway stations. The machines, which offer reusable face masks, gloves, hand sanitizer, and sanitizing wipes, were installed as part of the MTA’s larger effort to keep subways sanitized and safe during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

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Crown Heights, Policy, Transportation

Photo of Franklin Avenue Station © 6sqft

Two subway stations in Brooklyn will be renamed after Medgar Evers College and the Civil Rights activist for whom the historic black college is named. Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday announced that Franklin Avenue and President Street stations in Crown Heights will formally be renamed this fall, with MTA maps and signage updated this summer. The new stations–Franklin Avenue-Medgar Evers College and President Street-Medgar Evers College–aim to honor the contributions of the institution ahead of its 50th anniversary.

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Transportation

Day one at Jackson Heights-Roosevelt Ave Station; Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit on Flickr

On Monday, the first day of New York City’s phase one reopening, more than 800,000 straphangers rode the subway. According to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, June 8 became the highest ridership day since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. The agency said ridership was up during afternoon peak hours between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., with Manhattan seeing a 20 percent increase in ridership from the week prior. However, this is still just 15 percent of regular ridership compared to last year.

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Transportation

14th Street Busway; Photo: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit on Flickr

The busway on 14th Street in Manhattan will be made permanent, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Monday. The car-free strip of the street, which runs between 3rd and 9th Avenues, launched as part of a pilot program last October. The mayor called the busway, which has proven popular with riders, a “success by every measure.” De Blasio also announced the phased-in addition of five new busways and 16.5 miles of bus lanes, which are meant to alleviate crowding for commuters as the city begins the reopening process.

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Policy, Transportation

Photo by Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit on Flickr

With up to 400,000 New Yorkers expected to return to the workforce under the city’s phase one reopening on Monday, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority wants to add 60 miles of dedicated bus lanes to alleviate crowding. In a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio, Sarah Feinberg, interim president of NYC Transit, wrote a “robust bus system will be crucial” for the city’s rebound from the coronavirus pandemic.

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Policy, Transportation

Photo: Patrick Cashin / MTA New York City Transit

As the city prepares to enter phase one of reopening on Monday, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority released this week its plan to return to “regular” service, which no longer means 24-hour service. Subways and buses will run more frequently starting next week, but the subway system will still shut down between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. for nightly disinfection. Mayor Bill de Blasio this week also released a plan for transit that calls for capacity limits and blocking off every other seat. But the MTA called the mayor’s idea “utterly unworkable” and said his proposed capacity limits would allow the agency to serve just 8 percent of riders.

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