LGBTQ

Brooklyn, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Park Slope

Street view of the Lesbian Herstory Archives at 484 14th Street in Park Slope; © Google Maps

A row house in Brooklyn that is home to the country’s oldest and largest collection of lesbian-related historic material is New York City’s newest landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) on Tuesday voted to designate the Lesbian Herstory Archives building as an individual landmark, the first in Brooklyn designated for its connection to the LGBTQ+ community.

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Greenwich Village, History, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Julius’ Bar. Streetview © 2021 Google

New York City’s oldest gay bar is on its way to becoming an individual landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to calendar Julius’ Bar, a Greenwich Village establishment known for its historic 1966 “Sip-In” when members of the Mattachine Society protested the state law that prohibited bars from serving “suspected gay men or lesbians.” Considered one of the city’s most significant sites related to LGBTQ+ history, Julius’ Bar played an instrumental role in advancing the rights of gay New Yorkers.

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Art, Williamsburg

All renderings courtesy of NY State Parks on Flickr

Gov. Kathy Hochul on Wednesday revealed the design of a new gateway to Williamsburg’s Marsha P. Johnson State Park. Located at the Kent Avenue and North Eighth Street entrance, the ornamental entrance is meant to “communicate Marsha P. Johnson’s spirit and legacy” while complementing the park and surrounding neighborhood. The design of the gateway will continue through the fall of 2022 and construction is expected next year.

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History, Landmarks Preservation Commission, maps

Image courtesy of the National Parks Conservation Association on Flickr

In celebration of Pride Month, the Landmarks Preservation Commission last week released an interactive story map that highlights important landmarks in New York City known for their significance within the LGBTQ+ community’s cultural and civil rights movement. The project highlights seven individual landmarks throughout the city, including James Baldwin’s Upper West Side apartment and the Stonewall Inn, one of the most important sites associated with LGBTQ+ history in the United States. The story map focuses solely on individual landmarks designated primarily for their LGBTQ+ significance, not just sites that have ties to individuals and groups.

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Policy

Photo Credit: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office on Flickr

New York City on Monday rolled out a new marketing campaign in Florida inviting the state’s LGBTQ community to move to the five boroughs in response to the recent “Don’t Say Gay” legislation signed into law by Gov. Ron DeSantis. The five ads, which will run across digital billboards and on social media in five cities in the Sunshine State, are meant to highlight the inclusiveness of New York City and take aim at the new legislation, which bans the teaching and conversation of sexual orientation and gender identity from kindergarten to third grade in the Florida school system. The campaign also comes after DeSantis released an ad showing New Yorkers who moved to Florida.

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City Living

Courtesy of the New York Public Library

The New York Public Library this month has released a new list of reading recommendations to commemorate Pride. Curated by expert librarians across the system, the book list includes 100 titles for adults, children, and teens that highlight transgender, nonbinary, and gender-nonconforming voices. The new recommendations join the NYPL’s previous recommended LGBTQ reads, which vary in genre, from memoirs to manga.

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Art, Events

Photo via Nationaal Archief / Wikimedia Commons

On September 24, Sotheby’s will open the auction for “Dear Keith: Works from the Personal Collection of Keith Haring.” The auction is comprised of more than 140 artworks from Haring’s personal collection and is expected to raise close to $1 million, all of which will all go directly to the LGBTQ Community Center. The collection is being donated by the Keith Haring Foundation, which was set up by the artist and activist himself shortly before he passed away from HIV/AIDS in 1990. It includes pieces by Jean-Michel Basquiat, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Kenny Scharf, Jenny Holzer, and George Condo.

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Policy, Williamsburg

Renderings courtesy of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Office and NY State Parks

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Monday dedicated Brooklyn’s East River State Park to Black transgender rights activist Marsha P. Johnson, making it the first state park in New York named after an LGBTQ person and transgender woman of color. Located on the Williamsburg waterfront and known for hosting popular outdoor market Smorgasburg, the park will feature a new colorful public art installation honoring Johnson, who played a significant role in the Stonewall Uprising and was a founding member of the Gay Liberation Front. The dedication comes on what would have been Johnson’s 75th birthday.

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Policy, Williamsburg

Photo of East River State Park by Harold Navarro on Flickr

Brooklyn’s East River State Park will be renamed after black transgender rights activist Marsha P. Johnson, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Saturday. The park, located on the waterfront in Williamsburg and known for hosting outdoor market Smorgasburg, will become the first state park that honors a member of the LGBTQ community. Johnson, who passed away in 1992, played a significant role in the Stonewall Uprising and helped found the advocacy group the Gay Liberation Front.

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affordable housing, Bronx, housing lotteries

Photo via CC on Wikimedia

Seniors who identify as LGBT often experience housing discrimination, but dozens of affordable openings at one of New York City’s first subsidized developments targeted to this vulnerable population aim to create a different experience. Non-profit developer HELP USA partnered with advocacy group SAGE to create the mixed-use development at 775 Crotona Park North in the Bronx, which will combine low-income housing with an LGBT-oriented Senior Center on the ground floor. Starting Tuesday, individuals or households that have at least one household member who is 62 years of age or older and who qualify for Section 8 can apply for the 57 available units. Eligible residents will pay 30 percent of their income for rent.

Here’s everything you need to know to apply

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