Frank Lloyd Wright

Connecticut, Cool Listings, Historic Homes

Frank Lloyd Wright, Tirranna, 432 Frogtown Road, Ted Stanley, New Canaan real estate, Frank Lloyd Wright for sale

For the first time in 20 years, Frank Lloyd Wright‘s “Tirranna” home in New Canaan, Connecticut is on the market. The Wall Street Journal reports that the home, which Wright built just before his death in 1959 on a 15-acre wooded estate, has been listed for $8 million by the estate of its long-time owner, the late memorabilia mogul and philanthropist Ted Stanley and his wife Vada. Though the couple renovated the horse-shaped home, they maintained its original architectural integrity, preserving classic Wright details like built-in bookshelves, cabinets and furniture, as well as other unique features such as a rooftop observatory with telescope, gold leaf chimneys, and sculpture paths that wind through the woods.

See it all right here

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, New Jersey, Starchitecture

This unique listing should definitely get the attention of modern house lovers and math geeks. One of three remaining New Jersey homes (a fourth was moved to Arkansas in 2014) designed by Frank Lloyd Wright is up for sale for $995,000. The home was purchased by the current owners in 1996 and restored to “purists’ standards” in 2006. The house follows the architect’s “Usonian” plan which incorporates native materials and strong visual connections between interiors and the exterior landscape.

Check it out

Featured Story

Architecture, Connecticut, Features, Getting Away, Hamptons, New Jersey, Upstate

architecture day trips from nyc

Summer is the perfect time to get out of town and explore what’s beyond the borders of the city. While there is certainly no shortage of nature escapes and historic hideouts nearby, just outside of Manhattan in about every direction are also numerous modernist treasures to admire. Ahead is 6sqft’s round-up of the 10 best destinations for architecture enthusiasts with a penchant for modern design.

see them all here

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, New Jersey, Starchitecture

James B. Christie House, Frank Lloyd Wright, Usonian house, Bernardsville NJ

During his prolific career, Frank Lloyd Wright built four houses in the Garden State, the first and largest being the 2,000-square-foot James B. Christie House in Bernardsville, which dates to 1940. At the time, Wright, who coined the term “organic architecture,” told his client to find a site with “as much individuality as to topography and features—stream, trees, etc. and as much freedom from adjacent buildings as is possible.” Christie obliged, and the resulting home sits on seven acres of secluded woodland. For the physical architecture, Wright employed his Usonian principles of simplicity, practicality, and a connection to nature.

As Curbed reports, after selling in 2014 to a private buyer for $1,700,000, the Christie House is now on the market for $2.2 million after receiving a new roof and heating system.

Tour the property

Starchitecture, Video

Frank Lloyd Wright , Mike Wallace, Frank Lloyd Wright interviews, Frank Lloyd Wright NYC

“Fellow architects have called him everything from a great poet to an insupportable windbag,” begins Mike Wallace in a 1957 interview with Frank Lloyd Wright. This is the setup for a talk with the famous architect in which he asserts he could rebuild the entire country if he had 15 more years and that the New York City skyline is nothing more than a “race for rent,” a monument to “the power of money and greed,” and completely lacking any ideas.

In this animated video from PBS Digital Studio (h/t Reddit), set to the historic interview, we learn why Wright thinks centuries of architecture failed, what he feels is wrong with St. Patrick’s Cathedral, and how he believes he received the title of “arrogant.”

Watch the full video here

Art, Events, Starchitecture

Today is the 149th anniversary of prolific architect Frank Lloyd Wright‘s birth, and with next year being the big 150, the Museum of Modern Art has announced a major exhibition in 2017 that will feature roughly 450 works that he created from the 1890s through the 1950s. “Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive” will include architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, some of which have rarely or never been exhibited.

Find out more

Central Park South, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Interiors

1 Central Park South, The Plaza Hotel, Plaza, Plaza Residences, Cool Listings, Frank Lloyd Wright, Susanna Maggard, Central Park South,

The 4,000-square-foot Plaza suite that Frank Lloyd Wright once briefly called home just got a price reduction (and a broker change) from $39.5 million to $26 million (h/t Curbed). As 6sqft discovered last year, Wright lived in the corner apartment from 1954 to 1959 while he was working on the Guggenheim Museum. Though the architect’s past residency certainly adds interest, the impressive pad at 1 Central Park South does a fine job impressing us on its own—and we’re not alone, clearly, since the home was featured in Architectural Digest in 2014.

Current owners James and Lisa Cohen (chairman of Hudson Media and home editor at DuJour magazine, respectively) bought the sprawling condo for $13 million in 2009 to use as a Manhattan pied-a-terre (their main residence is in New Jersey). Then they proceeded to gut-renovate and redesign the home with help from Louis Lisboa of VL Architects and interior designer Susanna Maggard. The apartment headed back to the market last year for a renovation-reflecting $39.5 million. Now the colorful, luxurious and impossibly large four-bedroom pad is asking a significantly slimmer but still sizeable $26 million.

Read more

Featured Story

Features, History, Starchitecture

frank lloyd wright birthday

Few other architects have proved as influential as Frank Lloyd Wright, and it’s today that the great American architect would have been 148 years old. For many, Wright is considered the archetype of his profession; he was brash and unapologetic about his ideas, he experimented and tested the limits of materiality and construction, and he was never afraid to put a client in their place when they went against his designs. And it is this unwavering confidence and brilliant mind that made him one of the greatest—if not the greatestAmerican architect of all time.

To celebrate both his birthday and his importance to the practice of architecture, we’re paying tribute to Wright’s built, destroyed, and never-constructed NY works. Amazingly, of the more than 500 structures that are credited with his name, he can only claim one in Manhattan. Learn more about the architect’s timeless visions that came to be across the state, as well as what could have been, ahead.

Here’s our tribute to the greatest American architect of all time

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Starchitecture

1 central park south, the plaza, the plaza hotel, frank lloyd wright nyc address, frank lloyd wright the plaza, frank lloyd wright nyc

Did you know that Frank Lloyd Wright was once a resident of The Plaza? Neither did we! The Post reports that the 4,000-square-foot pad the prolific architect briefly called home has just hit the market for $39.5 million. Wright lived in the corner apartment of the storied building from 1954 to 1959 while he was working on the Guggenheim Museum. The location right by Central Park—and a 30-minute walk from the site of his iconic creation—must certainly have bode well for the architect’s creative juices.

Inside Wright’s former digs here

Daily Link Fix

falling water house, falling water frank lloyd wright
  • The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation’s website gets a beautiful overhaul that includes a comprehensive, searchable database of the architect’s works. [Fast Co. Design]
  • Tour a tiny, pattern-filled Chinatown studio. [The Cut]
  • The French bulldog was the most popular dog breed in NYC in 2014. See what breed reigned supreme in your neighborhood. [DNAinfo]
  • Second annual Lower East Side History Month is announced for May. [Bowery Boogie]

Images: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater (L); French Bulldogs (R)

Daily Link Fix

  • Because we all need a hug sometimes…here’s a weighted blanket that gives you a warm embrace. [Design Milk]
  • Dinner parties inside a dumpster aim to change the way people see food waste. [Untapped]
  • Watch Frank Lloyd Wright compete on the game show What’s My Line in 1956. [Archinect]
  • Staten Island’s deer population has increased 3,304 percent in just six years. [The Verge]
  • There’s a new face gym at the South Street Seaport. That’s right, a gym to “exercise” the skin on your face. [DNAinfo]

Images: The Weight via Mia Cinelli (L); Frank Lloyd Wright on What’s My Line (R)

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Starchitecture

Frank Lloyd Wright Designs Destined for NYC But Never Built

By Jason Carpenter, Tue, September 2, 2014

frank lloyd wright skyscraper oklahoma, frank lloyd wright skyscraper, frank lloyd wright oklahoma, price tower, frank lloyd wright price tower, St. Mark's-in-the-Bouwerie Towers Aerial

Many wonder why such a prolific and famous architect as Frank Lloyd Wright didn’t have more buildings in New York City. It’s safe to say he wasn’t a huge fan of urban density, but how could one possibly create something as iconic as the Guggenheim’s spirals without getting any other work in the city? As we showed in a previous post, two Wright designs have actually been demolished. Now, we will look at the two buildings Wright intended for the New York area which were never fully realized—at least, not in Manhattan.

See the Frank Lloyd Wright designs here

Starchitecture, Transportation, Upstate

Filling up the ole’ gas tank is not a glamorous job, and usually not a task that leaves one marveling at the surrounding architecture.  But in 1927, Prairie-style extraordinaire Frank Lloyd Wright put together plans for a fuel filling station in Buffalo, New York that would leave even the most seasoned driver awe struck.

Now, almost 90 years later, the Buffalo Transportation Pierce-Arrow Museum has realized Wright’s vision and constructed the station as a one-of-a-kind installation housed in a 40,000-square-foot glass and steel atrium, made possible by a $6.3 million state grant. The arts-and-crafts gas station, the third Wright recreation in Buffalo, makes a nod to Native American design and thoughtfully mixes practicality with visual appeal.

Take a virtual tour of the architectural masterpiece

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Manhattan, Midtown East

A model home at the Usonian Exhibition Pavilion in NYC

Frank Lloyd Wright is one of architecture’s most important figures, and you can see his work in five countries and 37 of 50 states. But when it comes to New York City, there is only one major Wright construction to be found: The Guggenheim. There is also a pre-fab house in Staten Island and one in Blauvelt just north of the city, but what other work did he do in the five boroughs? It turns out that Wright designed two other major projects in NYC, but both have been demolished. Here’s a look at these lost works by the great architect.

See the historic Frank Lloyd Wright works here

Architecture, Cool Listings, Green Design, Interiors

48 Clausland Mountain Road (also known as the Socrates Zaferiou House) designed by Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright has put his stamp on some of the world’s most famous and recognizable structures, including New York City’s own Guggenheim Museum.

But did you know the prolific architect was also the forefather of a revolutionary style of residential housing that informed the airy, open floor plans seen in many modern homes today? Wright’s Prairie style took hold in the Midwest during the early 20th-century and quickly spread across the country, profoundly influencing the built landscape we know today. If you’ve ever wanted to live in an iconic Wright home, this could be your chance: One of the few prefab Prairie homes designed by the architect has hit the market, and it’s just a quick half-hour drive from Manhattan.

Take a tour of the retro, mid-century property

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