220 central park south

Featured Story

building of the year, Features

Last day to vote for 6sqft’s 2017 Building of the Year!

By Emily Nonko, Mon, December 11, 2017

This year was all about new development redefining the New York City skyline. Construction moved along at a rapid pace, whether it be the topping out of Richard Meier’s tower at 685 First Avenue or foundational work kicking off at Brooklyn’s first supertall 9 Dekalb. In the next several years we’ll see these buildings open and show off apartments at sky-high prices, but for now, we get to enjoy the construction process on some of the most notable new architecture to come to New York.

We’ve narrowed down a list of 12 news-making residential structures for the year. Which do you think deserves 6sqft’s title of 2017 Building of the Year? To have your say, polls for our third annual competition will be open up until midnight on Monday, December 11th and we will announce the winner on Tuesday, December 12th.

VOTE HERE! And learn more about the choices.

CityRealty, infographic, real estate trends

New development visualized through 2020, via CityRealty

According to CityRealty’s 2017 Manhattan New Development Report, things are really going to heat up over the next few years. While new development sales dropped to $8.3 billion in 2017 from $9.4 billion in 2016 (attributed to a softening in the luxury market), there are a number of new big-time buildings that will commence closings and have the potential to drive total sales up to a whopping $11.9 billion by 2020. One key player is Extell Development’s One Manhattan Square on the Lower East Side. With 815 apartments, it will be the largest condo by unit count ever constructed in the city. And up on Billionaires’ Row, Extell’s Central Park Tower will have the city’s biggest sell-out ever at $4 billion, while Vornado’s 220 Central Park South is looking to set the record for highest price per square foot ever in NYC.

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Celebrities, Upper West Side 

Sting sells 15 Central Park West penthouse for $50M

By Michelle Cohen, Wed, October 11, 2017

British rocker Sting and his wife Trudie Styler listed their colorful futuristic duplex at the Robert A.M. Stern-designed 15 Central Park West for $56 million in May; now the New York Post reports that the massive pad at the headline-stealing celebrity magnet building has been sold to a mystery buyer for $50 million. The couple scooped up the 16th- and 17th-floor penthouse for $27 million in 2008 and enlisted the design pros at SheltonMindel to combine the units to create a unique home with not one but two sculptural spiral staircases and a double-sided spiral gas fireplace that was inspired by the Fibonacci spiral. The couple is reportedly buying a triplex in the latest Stern-designed limestone-clad trophy tower at 220 Central Park South, one of NYC’s most expensive apartment buildings.

Get one last look at the Sting-Styler digs

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Upper West Side 

British rocker Sting and his wife Trudie Styler have listed their chic duplex at the Robert A.M. Stern-designed 15 Central Park West for $56 million (h/t WSJ). The couple purchased the 16th- and 17th-floor penthouse for about $27 million in 2008, and then enlisted architecture and interior design firm SheltonMindel to combine the units and transform them into a “unique home” that includes two custom sculptural spiral staircases and a double-sided spiral gas fireplace that was inspired by the Fibonacci Spiral. Last summer, the couple was in negotiations to buy another Stern condo at 220 Central Park South, one of NYC’s most expensive apartment buildings, and now that they “need more space to accommodate their growing family” the time may be ripe to do so.

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Featured Story

building of the year, Features, New Developments

VOTE for 6sqft’s 2016 Building of the Year!

By 6sqft, Sat, December 10, 2016

For new developments, 2015 was the year of reveals, but 2016 was all about watching these buildings reshape our city. Ahead we’ve narrowed a list of 12 news-making residential structures, each noted for their distinctive design, blockbuster prices, or their game-changing potential on the skyline or NYC neighborhoods.

Which of these you think deserves 6sqft’s title of 2016 Building of the Year? Have your say below. Polls for our third annual competition will be open up until 11:59 p.m., Sunday, December 11th*, and we will announce the winner on Tuesday, December 13th!

Learn more about each of the buildings in the running here

Midtown, photography

Robert A.M. Stern‘s 220 Central Park South will eventually rise 950 feet amongst the supertall and super-luxury towers of Billionaires’ Row. As of August, the 66-story tower had risen 600 feet, and now that it’s nearing the homestretch, urban explorer and photographer Viktor Thomas decided it was time to get past the construction zone and scale the limestone skyscraper. First shared by Untapped, he posted this vertigo-inducing set of photos on his Instagram account @vic.invades that show the truly insane views from the tower.

See all the photos right here

Midtown East, Recent Sales

432 Park Avenue, DBOX, Macklowe Properties, Vinoly, Deborah Berke (52)

The most expensive apartment closing in New York City this year and one of the priciest sales ever is finally a done deal, reports The Real Deal. The apartment, the top penthouse at Rafael Viñoly-designed billionaire’s bunker 432 Park Avenue, is the priciest unit in the big-ticket building as well as being literally the city’s highest. As 6sqft previously reported, the buyer is Saudi retail magnate Fawaz Al Hokair. The sale price was $87.7 million—a skyscraping $10,623 per square foot.

More jumbo numbers, this way

Central Park South, condos, Construction Update, Midtown, New Developments

220 central park south, Billionaires' Row, Robert A.M. Stern, Steven Roth

Robert A.M. Stern‘s latest Billionaires’ Row blockbuster continues its rapid ascent into the sky. As CityRealty.com reports, 220 Central Park South (220 CPS) is now two-thirds of the way up, construction having knocked out about 600 feet of the tower’s eventual 950-foot height. Application of the limestone cladding started in April and has thus far been installed across over one-third of the building. When finished in 2017, the two-winged skyscraper with its rare and direct Central Park South frontage will host 118 luxurious homes across 66 stories—and it will be one of the city’s most expensive residences. Jump ahead to see more photos of all the work that’s been completed.

More photos of the tower under construction here

Celebrities, Central Park South

220 Central Park South, Sting, Trudie Skyler, NYC celebrity real estate

The NY Post reports that Sting and Trudie Styler are in negotiations to purchase a condo in the Robert A.M. Stern-designed 220 Central Park South. The tantric twosome aren’t new to the parkside circuit; they’re currently among the significant celebrity contingent at the also-Stern-designed 15 Central Park West, where the pop star purchased a 5,413- square-foot penthouse for $26.5 million in 2008.

Find out more

Architecture, infographic, New Developments

nyc buildings compared to world buildings

Gray silhouettes from left to right: Shanghai World Financial Center, CTF Finance Centre, One WTC, Lotte World Tower, Mecca Royal Clock Tower, Shanghai Tower, Burj Khalifa. Click link here to enlarge >>

As the Skyscraper Museum so aptly writes, “Tall and BIG are not the same thing.”

Echoing 6sqft’s recent post on global supertalls, the infographic above illustrates how when the height of New York’s tallest towers are stacked up against the sky-high constructions abroad (and 1 WTC), our city’s skyscrapers truly are “runts on the world’s stage.” The image also reveals that not only do these towers lack significantly in height, but also in girth. This means what really makes the design of all of New York’s new skyscrapers so unique is not how tall they are, but rather, how slender they are.

more on all that here

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