real estate trends

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City Living, Features, real estate trends, Upper East Side

Upper East Side

The Upper East Side isn’t just for your grandparents anymore. Photo by Ed Yourdon cc

There’s been so much talk lately about how the Upper East Side is the next cool ‘hood–this guy even says it’s cooler than Brooklyn–and while that may be true (the neighborhood’s got a Meatball Shop; is there really any use denying it anymore?), we have our sights set slightly farther north.

The high 80’s and 90’s, clustered between Park and 1st Avenues, is a hot spot for young professionals who are looking for little more culture and a little less of the bro-tastic bar scene, as well as for just-starting-out families who want a community feel, but not the sky-high rents of Park Avenue and Museum Mile. A slew of new residential developments are popping up in the area, as are fun, independent restaurants and bars. And this piece of Manhattan offers almost just the same transportation convenience as the Upper East Side proper, but with lower rents and a calmer feel.

More on the new Upper East Side

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Architecture, Brooklyn, Features, Manhattan, real estate trends

phillip lehman mansion

For Manhattan’s jet-set crowd, the 2010s are starting to look an awful lot like the 1900s.

New York’s upper crust are embracing a return to the Gilded Age, moving out of their fancy penthouses, co-ops and lofts and into opulent single-family mansions. From Aby Rosen’s quest to build the largest private mansion on Park Avenue to Jared Kushner’s conversion of three former Brooklyn Law School buildings into single-family townhouses—the most affluent buyers are now on the hunt for New York’s ultimate trophy prize.

More on makeshift mansions

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Features, real estate trends, Transportation

nyc parking

Car-owing New Yorkers can probably recite year-round alternative-side parking laws on cue, but most will also tell you how they loathe circling their block for 20 minutes, tracking which days to stay put, the inconvenience of babysitting a spot before the switch, figuring out a cluster of parking signs or, worse yet, arguing with a paid-for parking squatter. It often drives one batty.

Yet, there is an option and that’s paying for a monthly but costly sliver of asphalt—hopefully an elevator ride away or at the very least, a quick walk a few doors down. However, the key word here is “paying” and if you live in New York, that slice of space could put you back a pretty penny, especially if you’re shoveling out dollars for one in a new development.

Unless you’ve been living under a real estate rock, there’s no doubt you’ve read about the $1 million dollar spaces at 42 Crosby Street’s garage in SoHo. Is this lofty price tag for parking a market first? Nope.

more on the price of parking here

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City Living, Features, real estate trends

The Top 15 Family-Friendly Buildings in NYC

By Elijah Quinton, Mon, September 29, 2014

family-friendly nyc buildings

Last week, we talked to five families currently raising children in New York City’s many diverse and multifaceted neighborhoods about why they pick city living over the suburbs, and most of our readers agreed that they prefer an urban upbringing to the more “traditional” suburban childhood.

But once you’ve decided to raise your children in the Big Apple, it can be tough deciding which neighborhood is best for your family. Many factors come into play: What are the best schools in the area? What amenities does the building offer? Are there playgrounds nearby? How secure is the building? And the list goes on. But to make the process a little easier, we’ve rounded up 15 of the best family-friendly buildings in New York City.

Check out our list here

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Celebrities, Features, Historic Homes, real estate trends, Upper East Side

Timeless Trophy: 740 Park Avenue

By Dana Schulz, Thu, September 25, 2014

740 park avenue

New York City may have an ever-revolving cast of hottest restaurants, hippest clubs, and even most desirable neighborhoods, but some real estate titans never go out of style in this metropolis. Known as the “Tower of Power,” 740 Park Avenue is one such mainstay.

The Upper East Side 19-story, Art Deco building was completed in 1930 to the designs of Rosario Candela, often considered the finest architect of luxury apartment interiors, as the last of the grand dames erected along Manhattan’s Gold Coast. It didn’t reach its peak until the real estate boom of the 1980s, but is today one of the most sought-after addresses with 31 apartments, mostly all duplexes, triplexes, and penthouses. The massively scaled residences feature grand living rooms, formal dining rooms, spiral staircases, high ceilings, expansive foyers, and an abundance of windows.

Plenty more on this timeless trophy residence and its long list of well known inhabitants

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Architecture, Features, real estate trends, Starchitecture

Glass vs. Stone: An Epic Architecture Battle

By Dana Schulz, Thu, September 18, 2014

glas and stone nyc buildings, stone nyc buildings, glas nyc buildings

Decisions, decisions…sometimes there’s just far too many in New York City. Thai or Chinese takeout? Subway or bus? Central Park or the High Line? The list goes on. And one of the most grueling decisions we make as New Yorkers is where to live. From choosing a borough and neighborhood to deciding on a price point, it’s quite the undertaking. But what about the most elementary component of the building in which we decide to live–it’s material. To be more exact, glass or stone.

Glass tower dwellers are often drawn to the floor-to-ceiling windows, panoramic views, and clean lines, whereas buyers of apartments in stone buildings prefer a more traditional feel, with pre-war-style layouts that provide great separation of spaces. And some of the city’s most prominent architects have become synonymous with one style or the other. Think Richard Meier for glass and Robert A.M. Stern for stone. CityRealty decided to take a closer look at this epic battle and see how pairs of glass and stone developments fared across the city.

See how these buildings battle it out

condos, East Village, New Developments, real estate trends

New Amsterdam School 62 Avenue B, New Amsterdam School, 62 Avenue B, waldorf school manhattan, Ben Shaoul, 62 bloom

Back in 2012, when Magnum Real Estate‘s Ben Shaoul announced plans to turn the Cabrini nursing home in the East Village into condos, more than a handful of “Sledgehammer Shaoul” flags went up in protest. Plans moved ahead despite public outcry, and now more than two years later, the former nursing home has transformed into a luxury residential building called Bloom 62. Although not much has been done to dress up the exterior, the 26-unit condo is no slouch and boasts a number of enviable luxuries, including a landscaped roof deck and gym. But Bloom 62’s most valuable amenity may be what sits on its ground floor: a school.

More on the benefits to be reaped here

Events, opinion, real estate trends

2014 Massey Knakal Brooklyn Real Estate Summit, Massey Knakal Brooklyn Real Estate Summit, Brooklyn Real Estate Summit, brooklyn real estate, brooklyn real estate forecast, brooklyn real estate events

Brooklyn real estate is hot, very hot, and there’s no cooling off in sight, according to most speakers at yesterday’s sold-out Brooklyn Real Estate Summit, sponsored by Massey Knakal and held at the Brooklyn Museum. From Billy Macklowe to David Shorenstein and Jonathan Rose, get the run-down of what the industry’s leading pundits have to say about BK real estate.

What they’re saying about Brooklyn here

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Brooklyn, Features, real estate trends, Williamsburg

south williamsburg, south williamsburg gentrification, south view williamsburg bridge

A view towards the Williamsburg Bridge. Image © Ray’s Tours

There has always been a somewhat “invisible” line dividing ritzier North Williamsburg and the once-grittier-but-now-gentrifying South Williamsburg neighborhood—and that southern portion’s border is generally considered to be from Grand Street to Division Avenue between Union Avenue and the East River. And though this south side of the neighborhood continues to be populated by a diverse group of residents, new amenity-filled developments are quickly attracting a younger population and pushing prices to match those in the northern part of the nabe. Here, we take a look at some of the most notable developments and a few cool listings bridging the gap ahead.

Find out more here

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Features, Major Developments, real estate trends

nyc the golden age of related companies

Founded in 1972 by former tax attorney Stephen Ross, the Related Companies got its start securing funding for affordable housing upstate. Before long, the company moved to New York City, bringing affordable units to Battery Park City and the Upper East Side. When the boom years of the 1990’s hit, Related got involved with luxury development, beginning with the renovation and conversion of an historic Beaux Arts building at Union Square into the W Hotel and then the development of 1 Union Square South.

Today, the Related name is attached to some of today’s biggest and most high profile projects, including One Madison and Hudson Yards. And with more than $15 billion in assets, the company is New York’s leading real estate developer.

We take a closer look at Related’s high-end portfolio

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