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Features, Greenwich Village, History

“Mourners from the Ladies Waist and Dressmakers Union Local 25 and the United Hebrew Trades of New York march in the streets after the Triangle fire” 1911. Reproduction. The National Archives, via Wikimedia Commons

Around 4:30 p.m. on March 25, 1911, a fire broke out on the eighth floor of the Asch Building at Washington Place and Greene Streets, just as the young employees of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, who occupied the building’s top three floors, were preparing to leave for the day. The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire killed 146 people, nearly all of them Jewish and Italian immigrant women and girls who toiled in the city’s garment industry. Triangle stood out as the deadliest workplace tragedy in New York City before 9/11. It served as a bellwether in the American labor movement, galvanizing Americans in all walks of life to join the fight for industrial reform. It also highlighted the extraordinary grit and bravery of the women workers and reformers – members of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, and the Women’s Trade Union League – who fought and died for fairer and safer working conditions in New York and around the country.

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Greenwich Village, History

All photos: NYC Parks / Daniel Avila

The New York City Parks Department on Tuesday reinterred the human remains of early New Yorkers found during construction in and around Washington Square Park. The skeletal remains were placed in a wooden box and buried five feet below grade within a planting bed, with an engraved paver marking the site at the southern entrance of the park near Sullivan Street. The remains were uncovered between 2008 and 2017, including the unearthing of two 19th-century burial vaults in 2015 that held the remains of at least a dozen people.

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Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

Listing photos by Alan Chorm & Allison Dubuisson, The Eklund|Gomes Team at Douglas Elliman

Located at 77 Bleecker Street between Mercer Street and Broadway in Greenwich Village, the Bleecker Court co-op is a mix of post-war and pre-war structures, and this unit inside also has the best of both worlds. The 650-square-foot loft is technically a studio, but there’s a separate sleeping nook. For the $925,000 price tag, you’ll also get historic details like cast-iron columns and wooden beams along with modern additions like the contemporary fireplace and sleek kitchen.

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Greenwich Village, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Washington Heights

Street View of 70 Fifth Avenue, Map data © 2020 Google; Photo of W.E.B. DuBois in 1918 from Library of Congress, via Wikimedia Commons

A building in Greenwich Village that once served as the headquarters for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and housed W.E.B. DuBois’ trailblazing magazine The Crisis, could become a New York City landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to calendar 70 Fifth Avenue, a Neoclassical Beaux-Arts building designed by Charles A. Rich and built between 1912 and 1914. The commission also proposed the designation of two additional properties that “reflect New York City’s diverse history,” the Conference House Park Archaeological Site on Staten Island and the Holyrood Episcopal Church-Iglesia Santa Cruz in Washington Heights.

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Cool Listings, Greenwich Village

Photo credit: Evan Joseph Studio

This Greenwich Village co-op at 111 West 11th Street was built in 1873, and though the building’s 20 units have been beautifully modernized, some still retain their historic details. This one-bedroom unit, for example, is anchored by the original wood-burning fireplace. Asking $995,000, the apartment has an open and sunny layout, complete with a contemporary kitchen and an office alcove.

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Greenwich Village, GVSHP, People

Courtesy of Village Preservation

The former New York City home of author and organizer Jane Jacobs was honored this week with a historic plaque. The Village Preservation on Thursday unveiled the plaque at 555 Hudson Street in Greenwich Village during a virtual event. The 1842-constructed row house is where Jacobs, who died in 2006, wrote “Death and Life of Great American Cities,” a critique of urban planning of the 1950s and a call for more safe, walkable city streets and mixed-use development.

Learn more here

Featured Story

Cool Listings, Features

With the impending cool weather likely to limit the hours spent at city parks (which proved to be so necessary this summer) and the current health crisis still raging, New Yorkers will have to find creative ways to get some fresh air safely this fall and winter. For those looking for some outdoor space without having to leave home, we’re rounding up the best New York City apartments with outside amenities currently available to rent for $5,000/month and under, whether it’s in the form of a private garden, balconies, or a shared roof deck.

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Architecture, condos, Greenwich Village, New Developments

ODA Architecture, 101 West 14th Street

Renderings via ODA Architecture

ODA Architecture has made its mark all over the city, and it’s easy to tell when a project bears their name thanks to the firm’s signature boxy aesthetic, often filled with cantilevers and stacked volumes. Their latest project–a boutique condo at 101 West 14th Street–is no exception. The mixed-use development on the corner of Sixth Avenue features 44 residential units, half of which will be duplexes, as well as retail space at street level.

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Events, Greenwich Village

Photo by Steven Pisano via Flickr cc

Though the Village Halloween Parade was just a small neighborhood gathering in 1973, it has taken place and grown every year since then except after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. This year, however, the beloved event is being cancelled for the second time ever due to COVID-19. Jeanne Fleming, who has been the director of the parade since 1985, broke the news yesterday to the Post, but promised New Yorkers a special “trick” in its place, though she’s remaining mum on those details for now.

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Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Historic Homes

Photos by Andrew Kiracofe for Sotheby’s International Realty

New York City has several hidden mews sprinkled across its mostly gridded landscape, including MacDougal Alley in Greenwich Village. Located just north of Washington Square Park, the gated half-block cul-de-sac was constructed as a stretch of carriage houses to serve the townhouses that lined ritzy Washington Square North. Today, these charming carriage houses remain, and many of them have been transformed into private residences, like this one at number 6 Macdougal Alley. For the first time in 25 years, the nearly 1,800-square-foot red brick home is up for rent, asking $10,000 a month.

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