NYPL

History, maps

nypl, surveyor map, historic nyc

The New York Public Library has a challenge for all history gurus and NYC experts: Place unlabeled historic photos of the city at the correct location on a map. The new website called Surveyor crowdsources geotags of the NYPL’s photo collections with the goal of creating a digital database to make it easier to find images by the location they were taken. While some photos come with helpful titles that describe the location or the address, others only include the neighborhood or vague details. Since algorithms and search engines won’t be able to pick up locations of these old photos, the NYPL is seeking help from the public.

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History, maps

6sqft previously reported on the “time machine” map function that allowed users to navigate overlaid maps from 1600 to the present to see what used to occupy our favorite present-day places. Now, the New York Public Library has released the Space/Time Directory, a “digital time-travel service” that puts the library’s map collection–including more than 8,000 maps and 40,000 geo-referenced photos–to work along with geospatial tools to allow users to see the city’s development happen over more than a century, all in one convenient place. Hyperallergic reports that the project, supported by a grant from the Knight Foundation, plots 5,000 digitized street maps across the five boroughs, organized by decade from 1850 to 1950.

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Art, Events

Instead of hitting the bars this Friday night, check out the “Library After Hours” event at the main branch of the New York Public Library. On select Fridays, the landmarked library hosts a party after closing that lets guests mingle with food and drinks, music, and a behind-the-scenes look at some of their collections. This Friday, March 31st, the library is holding the event, “Women Marching Through History,” to coincide with the last day of Women’s History Month, where guests can admire feminist manuscripts, rare books, photographs, artwork, and films as well as participate in an interactive project to record one’s own story about living through this time in women’s history.

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Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Toilet Paper Paradise by Plamen Pletkov

In a city where hundreds of interesting events occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Ahead Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top picks for 6sqft readers!

If you haven’t been to the Cadillac House–the cultural venue by the car company–now is the time to check it out, as two artists take over the space with room-sized installations perfect for Instragramming. Mo Scarpelli’s compelling documentary about journalists in Afghanistan plays at St. Bartholomew’s Church, and Amelie plays at Videology. Get an insider’s tour of the historic New Yorker Hotel, then stay after hours at the gorgeous New York Public Library. The famed Salmagundi Club will stay open all night for a draw-a-thon, and the Bronx Museum of the Arts hosts another great Gala at the Conrad. Finally, Beau Stanton transforms his artwork into a special stop-motion film at Brilliant Champions.

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City Living, From Our Partners

After the divisive presidential campaign and the many other tumultuous events of 2016, the New York Public Library this week unveiled a campaign that aims to bring people together through a shared love of reading. “It’s a therapeutic way to be more open with each other around how they’re feeling and how they’re affected to help us move on,” said Christopher Platt, chief branch officer of the NYPL. Readers are encouraged to share their books via social media outlets using #ReadersUnite. The response so far has been enormous, with public libraries and school libraries, book lovers, bookstores and authors sharing their books du jour.

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Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Image © Luigi Rocca/Arnott Gallery

In a city where hundreds of interesting happenings occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Art Nerd‘s philosophy is a combination of observation, participation, education and of course a party to create the ultimate well-rounded week. Jump ahead for Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer’s top picks for 6sqft readers!

If you’ve ever wanted to learn how to compose a Wikipedia entry, do it in style this week at the Guggenheim’s #guggathon while helping beef up the entries on Chinese artists. If you’re feeling down on the current state of affairs, indulge in Luigi Rocca’s hyperrealistic acrylic paintings that honor the honest beauty of roadside Americana, or check out the fresh works from the artists in residence at the New York Studio Residency Program. Celebrate the beauty of the beard (yes, seriously) at Atlantic Gallery, and take a look at wearable art at Tee Time by Choice Royce. If lectures are your thing, head to the historic Loews Theater for a day of TEDx Jersey City, or pop over to the Mid-Manhattan Library for an artist talk with Paul Sunday. Finally, experience the media mogul Kippy Winston, in his talk-show style lecture that looks at current issues through an artistic lens.

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Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

In a city where hundreds of interesting happenings occur each week, it can be hard to pick and choose your way to a fulfilling life. Art Nerd‘s philosophy is a combination of observation, participation, education and of course a party to create the ultimate well-rounded week. Jump ahead for Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer’s top picks for 6sqft readers!

You spent the summer posing next to Deborah Kass’s giant OY/YO sculpture, now spend the fall hunting down David Crumley’s DUMBO reflector as it makes its way around iconic landscapes in the neighborhood. Head to Times Square for a chance to walk on the clouds, then jaunt up to the Museum of Art and Design to take in a lecture on innovative ceramicist Peter Voulkos. The Pivot Gallery is opening a three-person show with different takes on sculpture, including a jewelry designer from Givenchy, and LMAK hosts Popel Coumou’s contemplative photographs on silent emptiness. Get on the waiting list to hear Ilana Glazer talk about intuition at the Rubin Museum of Art, and go to the gorgeous New York Public Library for a talk on the legendary Louise Nevelson, the only woman in New York to have a public plaza named after her. Finally, while you’re driving around the state in search of autumnal serenity, stop at Cornell in Ithaca to check out CODA’s incredible recycled chair pavilion that’s snaking around the quad.

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Features, History

shakespeare and sons bed, paris bookstore with bed, shakespeare and sons paris

Image by Glynnis Ritchie via flickr

For many book lovers, there is nothing more exciting than the idea of a home library. What most of the city’s book lovers don’t know is that until recently, there was an affordable way to fulfill the dream of a home library—at least for book lovers who also happened to be handy with tools.

In the early to mid twentieth century, the majority of the city’s libraries had live-in superintendents. Like the superintendents who still live in many of the city’s residential buildings, these caretakers both worked and lived in the buildings for which they were responsible. This meant that for decades, behind the stacks, meals were cooked, baths and showers were taken, and bedtime stories were read. And yes, families living in the city’s libraries typically did have access to the stacks at night—an added bonus if they happened to need a new bedtime book after hours.

FInd out more about these apartments and the people who lived in them

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Architecture, Brooklyn, Design, Features, Queens, Video

nyply, schwarzman, stephen a. schwarzman building, new york public library

Flickr image by endymion120

With the advent of the Internet—namely Google—the role of the library has changed dramatically over the last 20 years. But even with the introduction of new technology, never have libraries played a more important role in educating the public—and their rapid growth in attendance proves this. Although the New York Public Library (NYPL) scrapped Norman Foster’s plan to renovate their flagship location last year, they still have a $300 million renovation plan in the works and they’re hard on the hunt for a high-tech redesign. While we may be years off before we see a new design emerge, The Architectural League and the Center for an Urban Future have made their own investigation into what could be by asking a handful of architects to drum up exciting new library designs that meet the needs of today’s tech-savvy users. Originally published on ArchDaily as “Five Design Teams Re-Envision New York’s Public Libraries,” Connor Walker explores the five design teams’ proposal for a better NYPL.

There are 207 branch libraries in the city of New York, each providing a number of services to city residents. From the simple lending of books to adult technical literacy classes, these institutions are as vital as they were before the advent of the Internet, and their attendance numbers prove it. Between the years of 2002 and 2011, circulation in the city’s library systems increased by 59 percent. Library program attendance saw an increase of 40 percent. In spite of this, library funding was cut by 8 percent within this same timeframe, which has made it difficult to keep many of the system’s buildings in good repair. To spark interest and support from city leaders, The Architectural League, in collaboration with the Center for an Urban Future, instigated the design study “Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries.”

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History, Social Media

NYPL, New York Public Library

Remember the old days of pay phones, encyclopedia collections, and writing letters on actual pieces of paper? Before the internet, life was a lot different, and the New York Public Library has a fun new project to remind us of that.

Referring to themselves as “Google before Google existed,” the NYPL will be posting old reference questions from the 1940s to 80s on their Instagram account every Monday. The staff recently found a box of these old gems, all of which were asked either via phone or in person.

Take a look at the first batch of questions from the NYPL

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