Museum of the City of New York

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Art, Features, History, photography

Busta Rhymes (Leaders of the New School). 1990. Photographer: Janette Beckman

New York has long been a haven for creatives, with some of art and music’s most iconic producing their most profound works within the borders of our city. But few movements have proved as significant and lasting an influence on global fashion, politics and culture than hip-hop. In a new photo exhibit coming to the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY) next month, three of the most dynamic and renowned photographers of the hip-hop scene, Janette Beckman, Joe Conzo, and Martha Cooper, share their experiences at the height of the movement in the 1980s when it took not only the nation by storm, but the world.

The trio of shutterbugs share photos that zoom into hip-hop’s pioneering days in the South Bronx, as DJs, MCs, and b-boys and b-girls were inventing new forms of self-expression through sounds and movement. Prominent hip-hop figures such as Afrika Bambaataa, LL Cool J, Run DMC, Salt N Pepa and Flava Flav are just a few of the faces documented, and in the series you’ll get a look at the kind of life and vibrancy that permeated the Bronx and Harlem during the 1980s.

MCNY recently sent 6sqft a slew of the more than 100 photographs that will be on show starting April 1st. Jump ahead to get a taste of what’s sure to be one of your most memorable and nostalgic museum visits.

See all the incredible photos here

Events, Major Developments, Midtown East, Urban Design

SL Green, KPF, Kohn Pedersen & Fox, 1 Vanderbilt, Grand Central, GCT, Midtown Rezoning

The proposed East Midtown Rezoning has been a hotly debated issue over the past few years. First introduced by Mayor Bloomberg, and backed by Mayor de Blasio, the rezoning would allow developers to build larger and taller than the current Grand Central Terminal district zoning allows in exchange for financial contributions to the area’s infrastructure needs. The Department of City Planning feels the rezoning would ensure that the area maintains its spot as a global business center, but others think it would forever ruin the historic nature of the neighborhood.

One of the most major components of the project is One Vanderbilt, a 68-story, 1,514-foot zigzag tower that will stand adjacent to Grand Central. Along with the building comes a reconfiguration of the Vanderbilt Corridor, the streetscape around the Terminal. A panel discussion at the Museum of the City of New York on January 20th will examine both the tower and the corridor and what they mean for Midtown East.

More about the event here

Art, Events

Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao

An upcoming exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York, New York: Assembled Realities, will showcase more than 40 works from Taiwanese artist Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao. His large-scale panoramas push the boundaries of traditional documentary photography by mixing several exposures of the same location taken over the course of many hours. The photographs that result are hyper-real and complex and provide a fascinatingly accurate depiction of the frenzy that is New York.

More on the exhibit and Liao’s work

Architecture, Art, Events

Rebuilding the World Trade Center, One World Trade Center, Marcus Robinson, Museum of the City of New York

In advance of the 13th anniversary of 9/11, the Museum of the City of New York will be premiering the documentary Rebuilding the World Trade Center. The 62-minute film features footage shot over the past eight years by artist Marcus Robinson, documenting the work at Ground Zero through the eyes of the construction workers, “from the site managers to those who dug the building’s foundations and the ironworkers who assembled its steel frames.”

The film will premier at the museum on the evening of Tuesday, September 9th and will be followed by a panel discussion with New York Times reporter James Glanz. It will then premier nationally on the History Channel on September 11th at 6 pm.

More on the documentary and upcoming event

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History

guastavino tiles nyc

Photo by John-Paul Palescandolo 

In New York, many of the grand Beaux-Arts masterpieces — Grand Central Terminal, the Queensboro Bridge, the City Hall subway station, Columbia University, and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine — have one striking element in common: Guastavino tiles. Spanish architect and builder Rafael Guastavino and his son Rafael Jr. brought with them to New York at the end of the 19th century a Mediterranean design technique from the 14th century for thin-tile structural vaulting. The expertly engineered and architecturally beautiful vaults were lightweight, fireproof, load-bearing, cost-efficient, and able to span large interior areas.

Today there are over 250 Guastavino works in New York City alone, not to mention the 1,000 throughout the U.S. The Museum of the City of New York’s current exhibition, Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile, explores Guastavinos’s spaces in New York and showcases “never-before-seen objects, artifacts, photographs, and documents.” We couldn’t help doing a little Guastavino exploration ourselves, and have put together some of our favorite tiled sites that you can actually visit.

See our picks right this way

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