indoor dining

Policy, Restaurants

Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

Restaurants in New York City will soon be able to serve more customers inside. Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Wednesday announced capacity can increase from the current 35 percent to 50 percent starting March 19. The announcement comes about a month after indoor dining returned in the city following a two-month closure starting in December.

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Restaurants, Williamsburg

All photos courtesy of Peter Luger

As New York City restaurants expand their indoor dining capacity to 35 percent on Friday, beloved Brooklyn steakhouse Peter Luger hopes to make the experience a unique one. Celebrity wax figures will fill the empty seats of its Williamsburg dining room, as part of a partnership with Madame Tussauds New York.

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Policy, Restaurants

Photo by Marcus Herzberg from Pexels

New York City restaurants can expand indoor dining capacity from 25 to 35 percent starting February 26, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Friday. “That will be consistent with New Jersey,” the governor said during a press conference, referring to the 35 percent capacity. After closing indoor dining in December, Cuomo said city restaurants could serve customers inside again on February 12, citing the end of the “post-holiday” surge of coronavirus cases. The governor last week also extended the closing times for bars, restaurants, and other businesses from 10 p.m. to 11 p.m.

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New Jersey, Policy, Restaurants

Photo of Asbury Festhalle & Biergarten by cogito ergo imago on Flickr

Starting Friday, New Jersey restaurants and bars can serve more customers and stay open later. Gov. Phil Murphy on Wednesday signed an executive order relaxing some coronavirus restrictions for indoor gatherings, pointing to a decrease in new daily cases and hospitalizations across the state. Under the order, which goes into effect ahead of Super Bowl Sunday, indoor dining capacity can increase from 25 percent to 35 percent and the 10 p.m. curfew at restaurants will be lifted.

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Policy, Restaurants

Indoor dining in New York City will shut down next week

By Devin Gannon, Fri, December 11, 2020

Photo by Billie Grace Ward on Flickr

Indoor dining in New York City will end on Monday as coronavirus cases and hospitalizations continue to climb, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Friday. Outdoor dining, delivery, and take out can continue. According to the contact tracing data from the governor’s office, restaurants and bars account for 1.43 percent of the spread of the virus in the state of New York. Indoor household gatherings making up nearly 74 percent.

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Chelsea, Restaurants

City Winery to open flagship venue at Pier 57 this week

By Devin Gannon, Tue, October 13, 2020

Photo of dining room by Adam Pass

The massive new flagship of entertainment venue and restaurant City Winery will open this week at Hudson River Park’s Pier 57. Starting October 15, the restaurant will accept reservations for limited capacity indoor and outdoor dining, with 200 seats available inside and 70 seats outside. City Winery was forced to move from its longtime Varick Street location last year after the Walt Disney Company purchased the property with plans to open new production space and offices there.

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Featured Story

City Living, Features, Restaurants

Everything you need to know about indoor dining in NYC

By Dana Schulz, Tue, September 29, 2020

Photo by Fábio Alves on Unsplash

After being shut down for more than six months, indoor dining in New York City returns tomorrow. The biggest difference is that restaurants can only operate at 25-percent capacity, but there is also a long list from the state of rules and regulations. Plus, Governor Cuomo has instituted a compliance component that will deploy 400 enforcement personnel and allow New Yorkers to fill out online complaint forms. If you’re thinking about partaking in indoor dining, we’ve put together a guide that outlines everything you need to know.

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Policy, Restaurants

Photo by 6sqft

Restaurants in New York City can charge diners a fee of up to 10 percent of the total bill for in-person dining under new legislation passed by the City Council on Wednesday. The “COVID-19 Recovery Charge” aims to offset losses businesses have suffered since the start of the health crisis in March. The surcharge will be permitted until 90 days after full indoor dining resumes. Gov. Andrew Cuomo this month said indoor dining can reopen on September 30 at 25 percent capacity.

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Policy, Restaurants

New York City will open indoor dining on September 30

By Devin Gannon, Wed, September 9, 2020

Photo by Marcus Herzberg from Pexels

Restaurants in New York City will be able to resume indoor dining on September 30, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Wednesday. Capacity will be limited to 25 percent with strict coronavirus-related regulations in place. In addition to the task force led by the State Liquor Authority, the city will provide 400 inspectors to oversee compliance at restaurants. Cuomo said the state will also rely on city residents to report any violations. “I believe in New Yorkers to do the right thing,” the governor said during a press briefing.

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Policy, Restaurants

St. Marks Place outdoor dining; Photo by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

Indoor dining could resume in New York City only if police are able to enforce compliance of coronavirus regulations at restaurants, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday. During a call with reporters, the governor said he could allow restaurants to open for indoor dining if the city creates a task force of NYPD officers designated to oversee compliance. Cuomo said he plans to discuss the issue with City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, who on Wednesday called for an immediate start of indoor dining, which has been allowed in every region in the state except the five boroughs.

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