Gensler

Architecture, Midtown

550 Madison Avenue, AT&T Building, Gensler

All renderings courtesy of Gensler

It’s been two years since developers unveiled their plans for a $300 million renovation of 550 Madison Avenue, helmed by architecture firm Snøhetta. Built in 1984 to the designs of Philip Johnson and John Burgee, the 647-foot building was the world’s first postmodern skyscraper. After several revisions, the renovation plans were approved by the LPC in February, and now, developer the Olayan Group has revealed the first renderings of the lobby. Most notably, the interior designs respect the 110-foot arched entryway and vaulted ceilings and add a window overlooking the proposed new public garden in the rear arcade.

More details ahead

Design, Museums

See inside MoMA’s $450M revamped, expanded campus

By Devin Gannon, Mon, October 14, 2019

53rd Street Elevation; Photo by Brett Beyer, courtesy of Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Following the completion of a $450 million renovation project, the Museum of Modern Art is set to reopen next week on October 21. In addition to expanding gallery space by nearly 50,000 square feet, the project reorganized the layout of exhibits, which now will be displayed chronologically instead of by discipline. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Gensler, the new museum expanded west into the former site of the American Folk Art Museum and within the base of Jean Nouvel’s new residential tower, 53W53.

See inside

Architecture, New Developments, Williamsburg

25 Kent, williamsburg, office, commercial, new developments, Hollwich Kushner (HWKN), Gensler

Photo credit: Ty Cole

25 Kent Avenue, Williamsburg’s first ground-up commercial office development in over 50 years, is now complete. The building spans a full city block and was designed by architects Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) and Gensler and to provide “a social campus for innovators, startup founders, and tech leaders.” As 6sqft previously reported, the eight-story building holds 500,000 square feet of office space along the Williamsburg waterfront as well as retail at ground level and underground parking, with millennial-friendly rooftops and terraces and floor-to-ceiling windows.

Many more photos of 25 Kent, this way

Brooklyn, Construction Update, New Developments, Williamsburg

25 Kent, 25 Kent Avenue, Gensler

Rendering via Steelblue/Gensler

Silicon Valley will soon land in Williamsburg, according to the masterminds behind 25 Kent, an office building designed with the tech community in mind. The eight-story building at 25 Kent Avenue, the first ground-up commercial office development in the area in over four decades, has officially topped out. The building offers 500,000 square feet of office space along the Williamsburg waterfront, retail at ground level and underground parking, according to CityRealty. Designed by Gensler with concept designs by Hollwich Kushner (HWKN), 25 Kent will surely attract young professionals, with its millennial-friendly rooftops, terraces and floor-to-ceiling windows.

Details here

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Midtown East

601 Lexington Avenue Market Building, Citicorp Center, Gensler, Boston Properties

Earlier this month, 6sqft revealed renderings of 601 Lexington Avenue‘s (the Midtown East skyscraper formerly known as the Citicorp Center) new “Market Building,” comprised of an interior atrium to hold dining/retail space and a new outdoor plaza and terraces. Though the LPC landmarked the building this past December, the Architect’s Newspaper has learned of a loophole in the designation regarding the privately owned public space, which could mean that amid the renovation, the sunken plaza and cascading fountain designed by Hideo Sasaki‘s firm–one of the iconic landscape architect’s few remaining works–may be demolished.

The full story ahead

Architecture, Midtown East

601 Lexington Avenue Market Building, Citicorp Center, Gensler, Boston Properties

The Midtown East skyscraper formerly known as the Citicorp Center, now called simply 601 Lexington Avenue, was made an official city landmark this past December, thanks to distinctive features including its 45-degree angular roof and base of four columns that resemble stilts. When designed by Hugh A. Stubbins & Associates in 1978, the site also included a privately owned public space with a connection to the Lexington Avenue-53rd Street subway station, which co-owner Boston Properties is now looking to update. They’ve tapped the designers at Gensler to envision a 200,000-square-foot “Market Building,” which will consist of a new outdoor plaza and terraces, as well as an interior atrium space that will host trendy dining and retail options.

More renderings and details

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Transportation, Urban Design

With New York City’s population on its way to nine million, the city’s infrastructure may be impressive, but it has its limits–including red tape and resource shortages–that will make it difficult to withstand the projected surge. Reminding us of the transformative innovations of Robert Moses–he of the big ideas and ego to match–Crains invited 12 firms who make their living wrangling infrastructure to hit us with some big ideas. Ahead of the upcoming summit, “Getting Ready for 9 Million New Yorkers,” they’ve shared these visions for future (bigger, better) New York from top architects, designers and real estate experts. Ideas include some that have already proven themselves (repurposing existing track beds) and some already in the works (Bushwick’s Rheingold brewery project) to others that Robert Moses might not love (shrinking the city’s highways).

Take a look at these futuristic ideas for moving the city forward.

Architecture, Financial District

One World Trade Center sky lobby, Gensler, One World Trade Center

Tenants at One World Trade Center who occupy floors above 65 are required to change elevators at the 64th floor. When the building opened its doors two summers ago, the Durst Organization noticed that these elevator banks became a natural mingling area, and so decided to forego plans to make the space into offices and instead keep it open as an open sky lobby. Commercial Observer got a first look at renderings of the commons designed by Gensler, whose principal and design director Tom Vecchione referred to it as “a shared piazza for the entire building.” In addition to a cafe, it will offer a game room and a 180-person meeting room that can be split into two or host fitness and yoga classes.

More renderings and details ahead

Daily Link Fix

  • NYC Parks and the Battery Conservancy announced that the Fleurt Chair by Canadian designer Andrew Jones is the winner of the first-ever design competition to create a moveable, outdoor chair for a New York City park.
  • Rego Park has a new “green” playground, complete with colorful murals, fitness stations, and an outdoor classroom, reports DNAinfo.
  • Get rid of those disgusting, chewed up tennis balls. Odin (named after the designer’s Corgi) is a stylish, 3D-printed dog toy that is a treat-finding puzzle for your pooch. More on Co.Design.
  • The Observer talks to fashion designer Nicole Miller about her eclectic Tribeca loft.
  • Gensler is the 2014 American Institute of Architects (AIA) New York State Firm of the Year.

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