Emery Roth

Celebrities, Cool Listings, Midtown East

Photo Credit: James Smolka/ Brown Harris Stevens

One of New York City’s most storied apartments has just hit the market. John Lennon’s former penthouse at 434 East 52nd Street, where he briefly lived with his mistress May Pang during the 1970s and famously spotted a UFO, is asking $5.5 million. The 4,000-square-foot triplex in the Southgate co-op, located where Sutton Place, Beekman, and Midtown East meet, was also where the iconic photos of Lennon wearing a tank top that said “New York City” were taken.

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Cool Listings, Interiors, Sutton Place 

425 East 58th Street, co-ops, midtown east, cool listings

Listing images by Evan Joseph; courtesy of Compass

This Sutton Place duplex co-op is a corner unit on the 37th of 47 floors so it boasts sweeping views of the Midtown skyline and East River in every room. The five-bedroom, five-and-a-half bathroom residence spans over 6,300 square feet in the Emery Roth-designed tower at 425 East 58th Street, also known as The Sovereign. It’s now on the market for $7,995,000, with a minimum 50 percent down payment required.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper East Side, yorkville

Photos courtesy of the LPC

Members of the Landmarks Preservation Commission voted Tuesday in favor of landmarking two historic sites in Yorkville–the First Hungarian Reformed Church of New York at 344 East 69th Street and the National Society of Colonial Dames in the State of New York at 215 East 71st Street. As 6sqft previously reported, the Hungarian Reformed Church was designed in 1916 by esteemed architect Emery Roth as one of his few religious buildings and his only Christian structure. The Colonial Dames headquarters is housed in an intact Georgian Revival-style mansion built in 1929.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper East Side, yorkville

Google Street View of the church

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has voted in favor of giving a calendar spot in the landmark designation process to the First Hungarian Reformed Church of New York, one of few religious properties designed by the noted New York City architect Emery Roth–himself a Hungarian immigrant. The church is also significant for its importance to the Hungarian-American community that settled in the Upper East Side‘s Yorkville neighborhood.

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Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History

From the Bronx to Brooklyn, architect Emery Roth (1871-1948) left an indelible mark on the architecture and cityscape of New York. Specializing in luxury apartment buildings, the advent of steel-frame construction facilitated Roth’s projection of historicist designs to new heights. While Roth is best known for prestigious projects such as his slew of residences along Central Park West, he also designed numerous middle-class homes and houses of worship. Adding to the impressiveness of his scope of work is the story behind the man.

Learn about Emery Roth and his most distinctive projects

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Midtown

pan am building helipad

Perhaps the most detested Midtown skyscraper by the public, this huge tower has nevertheless always been a popular building with tenants for its prime location over Grand Central Terminal and its many views up and down Park Avenue. It is also one of the world’s finest examples of the Brutalist architecture, commendable for its robust form and excellent public spaces, as well as its excellent integration into the elevated arterial roads around it.

However, there is no argument that it is also immensely bulky with a monstrous height. As shown in the photograph ahead, to its north, the building completely overshadows the Helmsley Building, an iconic product of Warren & Wetmore’s Terminal City complex. The pyramid-topped Helmsley Building once straddled the avenue with remarkable grace, and as one of the city’s very rare, “drive-through” buildings, it was the great centerpiece of Park Avenue. But by shrouding such a masterpiece in its shadows, the Pan Am Building (today the MetLife building) desecrated a major icon that will unfortunately never recover from such a contemptible slight on a prominent site.

Read more about the significance of this building here

Cool Listings, Upper West Side 

320 Central Park West, Cool Listings, Upper West Side, Central Park West, Penthouses, co-ops, triplexes, Upper West Side

The listing for this prewar triplex penthouse on the Upper West Side says it’s “like a house hovering twenty-two floors above Central Park,” but one look at the sprawling floor plan suggests that “mansion” might be a better word. Five bedrooms may sound ordinary, if luxurious, but countless other rooms and suites, three enormous terraces on the middle floor, a wraparound terrace on the bedroom floor and helicopter views in every direction put this iconic home atop a classic Emery Roth-designed co-op at 320 Central Park West in a class by itself—and its $20 million ask certainly reflects its status.

Check out those views, this way

Cool Listings, Interiors, Midtown West

325 West 45th Street, co-op, the whitby, living room

Architect Emery Roth was considered the master of apartment design back in his day. In the early 1900s, he masterminded an impressive number of buildings with sprawling floor plans and luxurious finishes. (That was a time when the rich still needed to be convinced to live in apartments, rather than mansions.) He finished the Whitby, at 325 West 45th Street in Midtown West, in 1923. Since then the building has been broken down into mostly small studio, one- and two-bedroom co-ops.

This is a one-bedroom in the building that still has some pre-war details, although it’s lacking the gracious floor plan that made Roth so famous. Still, it’s a central location at a decent asking price, $489,000. And the apartment is pretty darn cute.

Take the tour

Cool Listings, Interiors, Midtown East

434 East 52nd Street, The Southgate, Emery Roth, Bing and Bing

Here’s an elegant prewar co-op at 434 East 52nd Street asking $1.749 million. The two-bedroom Beekman residence features northern and southern exposures and a stunning sunken living room. It would be interesting to see what the space would look like with less busy furniture and fewer pictures overshadowing the rich detail, but even with the distracting decor, you can see that this is a great place for a full-time residence or pied-a-terre.

More pics inside

Cool Listings, Interiors, Upper East Side

Remodeled Emery Roth Townhouse Returns, Asking $15M

By Aisha Carter, Thu, December 4, 2014

1145 Park Avenue, Emery Roth, Carnegie Hill Historic District, The Brick Church

For some reason, this remodeled five-story townhouse at 1145 Park Avenue couldn’t command its initial $18.9 million asking price. Now it has returned with a more appealing $14.9 million tag, and it’s hoping prospective buyers will be drawn to its carefully chosen high-end details and its bright, modern design.

Take a look at more photos, here

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Archtober2020