Long Island City

condos, Long Island City, New Developments

44-30 24th Street, Long Island City, Court Square

With another skyscraper proposal approved, Long Island City moves one step closer to looking like a Manhattan copycat. The latest sky-high tower to get its site cleared and zoning approved sits in Court Square at 43-30 24th Street. As covered by CityRealty, the permits show this building, developed by commercial real estate firm Stawski Partners, will hold 921 condos and rise 731 feet, almost 75 feet higher than the borough’s current tallest building at One Court Square. And if it finishes before the Court Square City View Tower next door, set to rise 66 stories and become Queen’s tallest, it will briefly hold that title.

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Art, Long Island City, New Developments, Policy

5Pointz, graffiti museum, Long Island City developments, aerosol art

Starting with the news that the iconic graffiti-covered warehouse known as 5Pointz in Long Island City, Queens, visible from passing trains since its beginnings the 1990s as an artists’ studio and exhibition space, was being razed and replaced by rental apartments, the building has been the subject of heated controversy. As 6sqft previously reported, in 2013 the complex was whitewashed of its colorful exterior murals under cover of night, and renderings surfaced for the rental towers that would replace it; as if to add insult to injury, the building’s owner, Jerry Wolkoff of G&M Realty, revealed plans to use the name 5Pointz as a marketing angle for the new development. Several attempts were made at intervention–and prevention of a similar fate for artists’ spaces since then. Now, the New York Times reports, a federal lawsuit filed by 23 5Pointz artists against Wolkoff, who ordered the art destroyed, is getting its day in court. On March 31, Judge Frederic Block of Federal District Court in Brooklyn ruled that the federal lawsuit against Wolkoff, who ordered the artwork destroyed–could have a jury trial, an incremental legal victory for the artists and a chance to confront Wolkoff in court to seek redress.

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Art, Green Design, Long Island City, Urban Design

It never hurts to think of warmer months on days like today, and MoMA PS1’s announcement of whose design will fill their courtyard this summer certainly does the trick. The winner of their 18th annual Young Architects Program is Jenny Sabin Studio. The Ithaca-based experimental architecture studio created “Lumen” in response to the competition’s request for a temporary outdoor installation that provides shade, seating, and water, while addressing environmental issues such as sustainability and recycling. The result is a tubular canopy made of “recycled, photo-luminescent, and solar active textiles that absorb, collect, and deliver light.”

More renderings and info on Lumen

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

View of residential towers from Queens Plaza as of last week, via CityRealty

Of the 30+ under-construction and proposed projects in Long Island City, many of the tallest and bulkiest are located near Queens Plaza, including this trio of slab-glass rental towers from Tishman Speyer and H&R Real Estate Investment Trust that will bring nearly 1,800 new apartments to the area. The residential buildings–located at 28-34 Jackson Avenue, 28-10 Jackson Avenue and 30-02 Queens Boulevard–are directly adjacent to Tishman’s two-towered commercial venture that will be home to WeWork, Macy’s, and a food hall. CityRealty recently stopped by the construction to see how things are shaping up at the rentals, which from the looks of it are well on their way to welcoming in LIC’s newest batch of residents.

Find out more this way

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

When it’s completed in March, Long Island City‘s Tower 28 (formerly 28 on 28th) will be the tallest residential building in Queens at 647 feet and 57 stories–that is, until it’s taken over by the 66-story Court Square City View Tower nearby (this will also overtake the 673-foot 1 Court Square as the tallest overall building in the borough). Though its superlative will be short-lived, Heatherwood Communities‘ rental at 42-12 28th Street will still offer panoramic views, which new renderings from architects Hill West tell us will be taken in from a top-floor observatory, as well as a host of swanky amenities to “rival any vacation destination.” According to CityRealty, the new exterior and interior views also come with news that leasing will begin in March, ranging from $1,900/month studios to $7,500/month three-bedrooms.

More renderings and details ahead

Architecture, condos, Long Island City, New Developments

23-15 44th Drive, Court Square City View Tower, Hill West, Long Island City condos, tallest building in Queens

When plans were originally filed in February 2016, the Long Island City skyscraper since dubbed Court Square City View Tower was set to reach 964 feet. In April, it got bumped up to supertall status at 984 feet, making it Queens’ future tallest building. It’s since been dropped to 66 stories, but according to a new project page from architects Hill West (formerly Goldstein Hill & West), it will still be Long Island City’s tallest tower, and therefore the tallest in the borough. CityRealty first noticed the updated details, which come with the first true renderings of the 800-unit condominium at 23-15 44th Drive. In addition to 360-degree views of Manhattan, the tower will offer an all-glass curtainwall facade, a retail base, and a slew of corner-apartment balconies.

More details ahead

Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

5pointz, Mojo Stumer, 22-44 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City developments

It’s been three years since Long Island City‘s beloved graffiti mecca 5Pointz was whitewashed overnight and a year and a half since renderings first surfaced of the bland 41- and 47-story rental towers that would replace the site at 22-44 Jackson Avenue. Despite a perceived lack of respect towards the artistic community, G&M Realty’s David Wolkoff eventually said he planned to set aside 20 artists’ studios and displays to make up for those lost at 5Pointz, and it looks like he’s making good on his word. HTO Architect, who designed the towers, initially put forth views of a large public park and rotating mural exhibit that would fill the space between the buildings, and now 6sqft has uncovered renderings from Mojo Stumer of the artsy entryway, lobby and pool, which reveal the graffiti-inspired logo for the project.

See it all right here

condos, Long Island City, New Developments, Queens, Rentals

Back in 2015, Property Markets Group and the Hakim Organization announced plans to erect the tallest tower outside of Manhattan in Long Island City at 29-37 41st Avenue. The residential building, then dubbed Queens Plaza Park, would rise 914 feet atop a Queens Plaza site and boast high-end condos and a projected $363.2 million sellout. However, in July 2016, the developers abandoned those plans, putting the site up for sale for an undisclosed amount. Now, as the Times reports, the Durst Organization has scooped up the site for $173.5 million and is considering going forward with the massive construction, but as a rental tower with more than 1 million square feet.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, Long Island City

Current view of construction via 6sqft

Rockrose Development‘s newest Long Island City rental The Hayden commenced its affordable housing lottery earlier this November. As first reported by Court Square Blog, the massive 50-story, 924-unit, amenity-filled complex at 43-25 Hunter Street will deliver 195 below-market units to the western Queens neighborhood when it opens sometime in 2017. The subsidized units are earmarked for households who earn no more than 60 percent of the area median income, and according to the building’s official lottery webpage, range from $913/month studios to $1,183/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Architecture, condos, Long Island City, New Developments

22-12 Jackson Avenue, ODA Architects, Long Island City condos

22-12 Jackson Avenue is the larger project to the right; 22-22 Jackson Avenue is on the left

ODA Architects have been on a roll across the city over the past couple years, marking their territory with their cantilevering cube-itecture. The other design element they’re becoming known for is the use of inner courtyards, seen most prominently at their massive Rheingold Brewery project and Bushwick hotel. They’re now incorporating both signature features at a new condo project in Long Island City at 22-12 Jackson Avenue, directly adjacent to their rental at 22-22 Jackson and across from the giant 5Pointz redevelopment site and MoMA PS1. CityRealty brings us the first look at renderings of the 175-unit, H-shaped building, which is the latest in a string of developments in Court Square.

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Long Island City, New Developments

Long Island City, Tishman Speyer, 28-10 Jackson Avenue

Residential tower at 28-10 Jackson Avenue (L); Commercial tower at 28-07 Jackson Avenue (R). Via Tishman Speyer

There are currently nearly 30 under-construction and proposed projects in Long Island City, which, as 6sqft recently described “is sprouting a small city worth of skyscrapers, ushering in thousands of new residents, hundreds of hotel rooms, and a few hundred thousand square feet of office space.” Two big-time projects come from Tishman Speyer Properties, who are erecting a trio of slab residential towers that will together usher in 1,900 new apartments. In a Wall Street Journal piece today, we get a first look at this glassy consortium, along with new details about the developer’s adjacent two-towered commercial project that will be home to WeWork, Macy’s, and yet another food hall.

Find out more about these projects

affordable housing, Architecture, housing lotteries, Long Island City

2222 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City rentals, ODA Architects

For those who think affordable housing and creative design don’t go together, this Long Island City rental from ODA Architects could very well change their minds. Known as 2222 Jackson Avenue, the 175-unit, 11-story building features the firm’s signature stacked cube shape and an exposed concrete facade that “maintains the structure’s seeming ability to change shape as natural light plays with the unique silhouette of the structure,” according to the teaser site.

As of tomorrow, 35 apartments here will be up for grabs through the city’s affordable housing lottery. Units will range from $850/month studios to $1,274/month three-bedrooms, quite the deal considering residents will be living right across from MoMA PS1 in one of the city’s trendiest ‘hoods.

Find out if you qualify

Apartment Deals, Friday 5, Long Island City

Every Friday 6sqft rounds up five of the best rental deals showcased on CityRealty.com’s no-fee rentals page, a space where house hunters can find the best concessions being offered by landlords across the city.

With its location just a hop, skip and jump away from Midtown Manhattan, and the trendiest parts of Brooklyn, Long Island City (LIC) is increasingly becoming a magnet for real estate developers, businesses and new residents banking on the area’s growth. But beyond the convenience offered by its prime waterfront location—and, of course, its comparatively affordable prices—LIC also boasts buildings with unbeatable amenities and stunning skyline and river views. Ahead are five brand new LIC buildings currently offering free rent and other concessions.

see the best deals this week here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Long Island City, Urban Design

NYC 2012 Olympic VIllage Morphosis, NYC 2012 Olympics, Morphosis, Long Island CIty, Hunters Point

Now that the 2016 Rio Olympics have come to a close, we can’t help but think what an incredible 17 days it would have been if they were here in New York City (logistical concerns aside). The city came closest in 2004 when it was chosen by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) as one of the five finalists to host the 2012 Olympics. London, Paris, Moscow and Madrid were the other four. Splashy renderings planted 27 venues across all five boroughs, New Jersey and Long Island, but the winning, and perhaps most eye-catching, proposal was the Olympic Village in Long Island City’s Hunter’s Point South by Thom Mayne’s Morphosis.

Get the full history here

Long Island City, New Developments

PMG, Property Markets Group, Kevin Maloney, One Court Square, LIC, Long Island City, Queens Plaza Park, 29-37 41st Avenue

Just about a year ago, 6sqft revealed renderings for Queens Plaza Park, an 800-unit 70+ story, 915-foot tall skyscraper planned for Long Island City‘s Clock Tower Building site (it would’ve encircled and incorporated the 88-year-old structure). At the time, this proposed height would’ve made it the tallest tower in Queens, as well as the tallest building outside Manhattan. However, it’s now not only lost its superlatives (it’s since been outdone by the 964-foot Court Square City View Tower in LIC and JDS’ 1,066-foot 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension in Downtown Brooklyn), but the project is being scrapped altogether (h/t Curbed).

More details

Cool Listings, Long Island City, Quirky Homes

NYC taxi Airbnb, yellow cab, Long Island City, strange Airbnb listings

Here’s your chance to sleep in a yellow cab without worrying about the meter. A listing has popped up on Airbnb for a “cozy one-of-a-kind NYC taxi van” that’s been “renovated into swanky living quarters.” This renovation outfitted the vehicle with a full-size bed that comes with soft pillows and bright yellow sheets (how fitting), a portable wireless air conditioner, and, according to the reviews, a couple bottles of Fiji Water. The $39/night price tag also covers the Long Island City location with views of the Manhattan skyline that’s walking distance to a bathroom and cafes with WiFi.

Find out more about these unusual accommodations

Apartment Deals, Long Island City, Queens

Long Island City Rentals, NYC Developments, Residential COnversions, Concrete Waffle Slab

Luna LIC has kicked off leasing on its 124 rental homes priced a fraction less than similar units in Manhattan. Situated one subway stop from Midtown at 42-15 Crescent Street within the Queens Plaza section of Long Island City, the leasing team for a limited time is offering a month’s free rent and no broker’s fee for incoming lease signors. Current availabilities specify net effective rents beginning at $1,962/month for studios, $2,399 for one-bedrooms and $3,599 for two-bedrooms.

Find out what these prices get you

Cool Listings, Interiors, Long Island City

45-10 11th street, townhouse, long island city, living room

Long Island City is a neighborhood better known for its warehouses and new waterfront development than it is historic townhouses. But there are a few blocks of the neighborhood that look more Brooklyn than Queens, with 19th century townhouses along tree-lined streets. It’s not everyday that one of these gems hits the market–here’s a charming home that was listed this spring–but this one at 45-10 11th Street is now asking $2.395 million. It’s been in the same family for 34 years and still has lovely interior details from when the home was constructed in 1911.

Take a tour

Apartment Deals, Long Island City, New Developments, Queens, Rentals

LIC Rentals, Long Island City Apartments, Fogarty Finger

Not all of Long Island City’s new developments are gargantuan or fully encased in glass. One such anomaly is Ranger Properties’ recently opened rental building called the Baker House. Replacing a building that housed the Bakers Union Local 3, the development rises a modest nine floors within the human-scaled confines of the Dutch Kills section of the neighborhood, the 47,000 square-foot building was designed by Fogarty Finger Architects and boasts a tasteful exterior of red brick, metal and staggered floor to ceiling glass windows.

Inside are 48 light-bathed apartments ranging from studios to two-bedroom layouts. Remarkably, after debuting on the market just earlier this year, the leasing agents at Modern Spaces have all but one of the units accounted for. The sole remaining home is a 700 square-foot, one-bedrooms, one-bathroom on the eighth floor, priced at a net-effective rent of $2,529/month. All residences are outfitted with white oak hardwood floors, Carrara marble baths, and open kitchens with Pedini cabinets and Bosch appliances.

find out more here

Architecture, Long Island City, Urban Design

Lissoni Architettura, NYCAquatrium, submerged aquarium, NYC aquarium

By now we all know about the urban design fad of floating things in NYC’s rivers (Pier55, +Pool, this island), but here’s a concept for an under-water public space off Long Island City. Untapped took a look at this proposal for a submerged aquarium from Milan-based architecture firm Lissoni Architettura. Titled NYCAquatrium, it will likely never get built since it’s just the winning entry in Arch Out Loud’s ideas competition for a New York City aquarium and public waterfront, but it’s certainly an innovative project.

See all the renderings and get more details

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments

Court-Square-View

In February, Flushing-based developer Chris Jiashu Xu of United Construction & Development Group filed plans for a 79-story, 964-foot residential tower in Long Island City, giving it the title of would-be tallest tower in Queens. Dubbed Court Square City View Tower, it’s located just north of One Court Square (the borough’s current tallest building at 658 feet), but new information reveals that it will now steal the title by even more of a landslide.

The developer put in a request with the Federal Aviation Administration for a 984-foot-tall tower, sending it into supertall territory. And with its mechanical bulkhead, the structure will rise 1,000 feet.

The rest of the details

Featured Story

Architecture, Carter Uncut, Features, Long Island City, Queens, Urban Design

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. Here, Carter brings us his sixth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the new towers defining the Queens skyline.

For a long time, the glass tower erected by Citibank was the lone skyscraper of note in Queens. Known initially as Citicorp at Court Square, it was built in 1989 and designed by Raul de Armas of SOM as a blue-green metal-panel-and-glass office tower with just a few setbacks at its 633-foot-high top—an extremely clean-cut, modern obelisk of fine proportions.

In a 1988 article in The New York Times, Anthony DePalma wrote that the tower “dominates the Queens skyline like a sequoia in the desert” and Paul Goldberger, then the newspaper’s architecture critic, wrote the tower was “rapidly becoming one of the most conspicuous structures in the entire city.” He added, “It is a very unlikely thing, this building—no other skyscraper in New York is remotely like the Citicorp tower, not so much for its design as for the fact that it stands free, alone in this landscape of gas stations, warehouses and row houses,”

The bank tower transformed “the landscape of New York” and “no longer does Manhattan virtually by itself control the skyline,” Mr. Goldberger continued. “Skyscrapers built at random all over New York would be devastating, but an occasional exclamation point, well designed and carefully placed, will do the skyline no grievous harm,” he concluded. This is a very important but also very controversial point as currently evidenced in Manhattan where traditional precincts are being pin-pricked to exhaustion and confusion by supertalls.

more on the queens skyline

Hotels, Long Island City, New Developments

DREAM HOTEL LIC, 9-03 44th Road (3)

Near Long Island City‘s East River waterfront, work has begun on an eleven-story, 199-room DREAM Hotel conceived through a joint venture between Millhouse Peck Properties, Barone Management and MATT Development. The hotel will rise from a full-block, commercially-zoned lot between 44th Road, 44th Avenue, and 9th and 10th streets, which was previously home to Manhattan Cabinetry’s factory building (the company has since relocated those operations to Woodside).

Stephen B. Jacobs Group has been tapped as the architect and the studio has designed a Standard Hotel-esque tower where the room floors are pitched above various restaurants, bars and outdoor terraces. New nighttime renderings show windows framed by LED lighting. A previous image suggested the developers were looking to salvage a corner facade of the factory-building, but the facade is no longer depicted in the new set of renderings and the entire factory structure has been cleared from the site.

even more details here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Long Island City, New Developments, Queens, real estate trends

Watch out Hudson Yards, Midtown is moving east to Queens. The glassy ghetto formerly known as Long Island City is sprouting a small city worth of skyscrapers, ushering in thousands of new residents, hundreds of hotel rooms, and a few hundred thousand square feet of office space. To help us visualize the neighborhood’s upcoming transformation, the dynamos at Rockrose Development commissioned visualization experts Zum-3d to produce this exceptionally accurate depiction of the changes afoot. Inspired by the rendering, 6sqft has put together a rundown of the nearly 30 under-construction and proposed projects for the ‘hood.

See the full roster ahead

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Long Island City

We may most often think of the Hunters Point section of Long Island City as the home of a decade-plus building boom that has resulted in a neighborhood of glassy luxury condo and rental towers with amenities galore. But the sleek, vertical community also has an historic district and streets lined with 19th-century row houses.

Built in 1887 as one of six brick houses, the two-story-plus-basement row house at 21-24 45th Avenue is among the neighborhood’s historic finds, and it’s currently for sale asking $1.2 million. The listing notes that the building is being delivered as-is with SRO tenants. It’s currently set up as a five-unit rental property with a vacant sixth (studio) unit.

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Architecture, condos, Cool Listings, Long Island City, New Developments

The Jackson, 11-51 47th Avenue, Fogarty Finger, Long Island City

Situated squarely between Long Island City‘s waterfront towers and its burgeoning Court Square and Queens Plaza business districts, an upcoming industrially-inspired condominium named the Jackson is beginning construction work. On Friday, the New York Times unveiled pricing information for the 70,000-square-foot project, and a polished set of renderings has been published on the developer’s website. The 11-story, 54-unit project is being shepherded by a joint-venture among Charney Construction & Development, Ascent Development, and Tavros Capital.

The development site, located around the corner from MoMA PS1, was formerly occupied by a parking lot and a nondescript two-story building. Fogarty Finger, the building’s architects, have designed several other low- to mid-scale residential projects in LIC that complement the fleetingly-gritty neighborhood’s aesthetic. Here they accomplish that by using raw material such as steel, concrete, and wood, as well as oversized windows that feel like an old industrial loft building.

This way for details, renderings, and pricing

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments

Court Square City View Tower, 23-15 44th Drive, Long Island City development, United Construction & Development Group, tallest building in Queens, NYC tallest towers, Goldstein Hill & West Architects

Back in August, 6sqft revealed renderings of the upcoming Long Island City skyscraper dubbed Queens Plaza Park, which is slated to rise 915 feet. At the time, this made it the tallest building planned outside of Manhattan, but a lot can change in six months. First off, Brooklyn will take the outer borough title, as a 1,066-foot tower is planned for 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension in Downtown Brooklyn. And now, Queens Plaza Park will also lose its Queens-based superlative, as The Real Deal reports that there’s a new tallest building in town.

Flushing-based developer Chris Jiashu Xu of United Construction & Development Group filed plans for a 79-story residential tower in Long Island City that will rise a whopping 964 feet. It’s located just north of One Court Square (the borough’s current title-holder at 658 feet) at 23-15 44th Drive and is titled Court Square City View Tower. The building is designed by Goldstein, Hill & West Architects (the same firm responsible for former tallest frontrunner 42-12 28th Street) and appears to be a fairly standard glassy volume. Its 759,000 square feet of residential space will yield 774 apartments, and there will also be 200,000 square feet of retail on the ground floor.

More details and views ahead

Architecture, Art, Long Island City, Urban Design

Escobedo Soliz, MoMA, MoMA PS1, Young Architects Program, YAP, Warm-up, Weaving the courtyard, Long Island City, Queens, Art, Architecture Prize, Outdoor installation, MoMA PS1 Warm-Up

MoMA has announced that the Mexico City-based architecture firm Escobedo Solíz Studio was selected as the winner of the 2016 Young Architects Program (YAP). Chosen from five finalists, the winning project,”Weaving the Courtyard,” will create a “temporary urban landscape” for the 2016 Warm Up summer music series in MoMA PS1’s outdoor courtyard in Long Island City, beginning in early June.

The site-specific architectural intervention will use the courtyard’s concrete walls to generate both sky and landscape, with embankments in which platforms of soil and water suggest the appearance of a unique topography. The architects describe their project as “neither an object nor a sculpture standing in the courtyard, but a series of simple, powerful actions that generate new and different atmospheres.”

Find out more

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

Raymond Chan Architect, The Lions Group, Jackson East, Jackson West, One Queens Plaza, LIC, Queens Plaza

Another day, another Long Island City project unveiled. This new build comes in at 27-51 Jackson Avenue by way of Lions Group, who are already juggling three projects nearby: Jackson East, Jackson West, and ONE Queens Plaza.

Last week, the LIC Post reported demolition permits were filed to raze the two small structures on the site. Construction permits have yet to be filed, but details from the project’s EB-5 offering page show a 13-story, 38,500 square foot tower designed by Flushing-based Raymond Chan Architect. The project will rise directly alongside an under construction Gene Kaufman-designed Aloft Hotel at 27-45 Jackson Avenue.

More here

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Long Island City

21-03 46th Avenue, Long Island City, NYC affordable housing

The affordable housing lottery for 21-03 46th Avenue in Long Island City officially opens today, and the brand new one-bedroom luxury units will be a mere $918, according to the NYC HPD. Apartments have private terraces, ten-foot ceilings, Brazilian cherry floors, chef’s kitchens with stainless steel appliances, and in-unit washers/dryers. Plus, the address is right across from MoMA PS1 and just a block away from the E, M, 7 and G subways. The catch? The building only has eight units and only two of these are deemed affordable.

Feeling lucky? Find out if you qualify.

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