Washington Heights

Cool Listings, Washington Heights

Photo courtesy of Tina Gallo for The Corcoran Group

On the fifth floor of the historic Hudson View Gardens co-op at 116 Pinehurst Avenue in Washington Heights, this one-bedroom home reflects the pre-war charm of the 1924 Tudor Revival building. Asking $495,000, the unit has been stylishly renovated with bright white walls and lots of color and charm.

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Art, Events, History, Museums, Washington Heights

All images courtesy of Alfonso Lozano

The Hispanic Society Museum & Library has opened a new exhibition that brings attention to the wide variety of art, literature, and history from the Iberian Peninsula and South America. Curated by art historian Dr. Madeleine Haddon, Nuestra Casa: Rediscovering the Treasures of The Hispanic Society Museum & Library features select “hidden gems” from the museum’s expansive collection of more than 750,000 pieces, including artworks by El Greco and Goya to masterpieces by lesser-known Latin American artists. The exhibition is open at the Washington Heights museum now through April 17.

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affordable housing, Manhattan, Washington Heights

Image courtesy of Gov. Kathy Hochul’s Office

Gov. Kathy Hochul on Thursday announced an agreement with New York State Homes and Community Renewal (NYHCR) to preserve affordability for 30 years for 190 households at Inwood Tower, a Mitchell-Lama cooperative development in Washington Heights. By terms of the agreement, NYHCR will grant the co-op a $7.6 million subsidy loan that the development will use for essential repairs. With this grant, the state has ensured that more than 22,000 Mitchell-Lama apartments remain affordable for low and moderate-income New Yorkers as part of its five-year housing plan.

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Events, Museums, Washington Heights

“Children on 162nd Street.” Gliclée print on archival fiber paper, 1901 (re-print 2021), Courtesy of the descendants of the Ettlinger Family.

One of New York City’s most historically significant neighborhoods is getting the attention it deserves in a new museum exhibition. The landmarked museum Morris-Jumel Mansion last month opened History Now, a collection of photographs by local artist Rose Deler that features large-format, black and white film portraits depicting the residents and architecture from the Jumel Terrace Historic District in Washington Heights. The exhibition will be open Friday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. through April 3.

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Architecture, Bronx, City Living, History, Washington Heights

Photo by Shinya Suzuki on Flickr

Described in 1967 by the Landmarks Preservation Commission as “one of Manhattan’s most picturesque architectural monuments,” the Highbridge Water Tower reopened on Wednesday following a restoration project. Located in Washington Heights, the octagonal tower opened in 1872 and served as part of the Croton Aqueduct system, helping increase water pressure throughout the borough. While it no longer is part of the city’s water system, the 200-foot landmark is the only one of its kind that remains today. The Parks Department also announced free public tours of the inside of the tower led by the department’s Urban Park Rangers will resume next month.

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Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Washington Heights

Listing photos by Scott Wintrow/Gamut Photos

New York City has a few hidden mews sprinkled throughout, one of which is Sylvan Terrace in Washington Heights. The one-block cobblestone stretch was originally the carriage drive for the adjacent Morris Jumel Mansion, and in the 1880s, 20 wooden rowhouses were constructed along it to serve as housing for working-class locals. A rare opportunity, the home at number 8 has just hit the market for $1,795,000. The current owner, who bought the property back in 1998 for just $135,000, is designer Tom Givone, who modernized the two-bedroom house to have a rustic-contemporary style that’s even been featured in Dwell.

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Featured Story

Features, NYC Guides, Washington Heights

The 18 best places to visit in Washington Heights

By Devin Gannon, Mon, June 21, 2021

A hilly neighborhood with stunning public parks, incredible food, and community pride, Washington Heights is special. Not only is this area full of natural beauty (it has the highest natural point in Manhattan and boasts incredible Hudson River views) and historically important (it served as a strategic defense point during the Revolutionary War), Washington Heights has long been an immigrant enclave.

As development hit the largely rural neighborhood in the early 20th century, Irish, Jewish, African American, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican communities have all called Washington Heights home. Today, a strong Latin American and Caribbean presence remains, with Washington Heights and nearby Inwood considered the most populous Dominican neighborhoods in the U.S. With this month’s release of the movie adaptation of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Broadway musical In The Heights, we’ve put together a guide of must-visit places in Washington Heights, from Manhattan’s oldest home to the city’s only underground street, with stops for roasted chicken and chicharrón along the way.

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Greenwich Village, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Washington Heights

Street View of 70 Fifth Avenue, Map data © 2020 Google; Photo of W.E.B. DuBois in 1918 from Library of Congress, via Wikimedia Commons

A building in Greenwich Village that once served as the headquarters for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and housed W.E.B. DuBois’ trailblazing magazine The Crisis, is now a New York City landmark. The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to designate 70 Fifth Avenue, a Neoclassical Beaux-Arts building designed by Charles A. Rich and built between 1912 and 1914. The commission on Tuesday also landmarked the Holyrood Episcopal Church-Iglesia Santa Cruz in Washington Heights.

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Historic Homes, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Washington Heights

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. (1937). Riverside Drive, no. 857, at 159th Street, Manhattan, courtesy of the New York Public Library.

Preservationists and local politicians are pushing the city to reverse their decision to not landmark a historic home with abolitionist history in Washington Heights. The two-story wood-frame home at 857 Riverside Drive in Upper Manhattan was owned by anti-slavery activist Dennis Harris who may have also been an Underground Railroad conductor. Despite a demolition permit filed by the current owner, the Landmarks Preservation Commission last November still rejected landmark status for the home because of the architectural alterations made to the original structure.

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Policy, Washington Heights

Map courtesy of the Governor’s Office

Since last week, many New Yorkers have been anticipating an announcement that the entire city will become an orange zone. This has been avoided at least for another day, but Governor Cuomo did announce that Washington Heights will become a precautionary yellow zone, hitting a 3.30% positivity rate. This is the first micro-cluster zone in Manhattan and the fifth and final borough to join this map. The governor also announced a dire situation on Staten Island in which an emergency overflow facility for COVID patients will open at South Beach.

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