All posts by Alexandra Alexa

Policy, Stuy Town, Stuyvesant Town

stuyvesant town, affordable housing, lottery, rentals

Photo by Kelly on Wiki Commons

When Blackstone and Ivanhoé Cambridge bought Stuy Town for $5.3 billion in 2015, they reached a deal with the city that would allow them to deregulate and raise rents on 6,200 rent-regulated units beginning in July 2020. On Wednesday, tenants filed a lawsuit to block Blackstone from going forward with the rent hikes, The Real Deal reports. As part of the original agreement, the city allowed Blackstone to cap rent increases at 5 percent each year, which is considerably more than the 1.5 percent outlined in last year’s new rent laws. The lawsuit argues that this conflict should require Blackstone to adjust the agreement in accordance with the new law.

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Art, Events, Upper West Side 

American natural history museum, the nature of color, nyc spring 2020 exhibitions

Photo credit: R. Mickens/© AMNH

For most of us, color is such a seamless part of how we experience the world that we don’t think to stop and question it. But color is more than just a visual phenomenon, it carries symbolic and cultural meanings, has the ability to impact our mood, and in the natural world, it plays a critical role in the survival of many species. The many dimensions of color will be explored in The Nature of Color, a new exhibition opening at the American Museum of Natural History on March 9th.

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Cool Listings, Upstate

Listing images courtesy of Houlihan Lawrence

In the quiet Westchester county village of Larchmont, this five-bedroom home sits on nearly two scenic acres and boasts a cascading waterfall on the property which inspired its nickname: The Waterfall House. Originally built in 1910, the residence was redesigned and renovated by architect Imrey Culbert in collaboration with the current owner, the listing tells us. On the inside, natural materials and architectural elements echo the nature outdoors while large windows throughout amplify the views. It’s now on the market seeking $2.55 million.

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Art, Brooklyn, Events, photography

Alex Webb, Park Slope, 2018. Chromogenic development print. Courtesy of the artist

Photographer couple Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb have lived in Park Slope for some 20 years and for just as long, they’ve been documenting the borough they call home. In 2014, the duo embarked on a collaborative series of photographs that show typically unseen corners of Brooklyn and tell the layered stories of its multicultural neighborhoods. A collection of 30 images from that series will be on view at the Museum of the City of New York beginning on March 11 in an exhibition titled The City Within.

More images, this way

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

St. Patrick’s Day takes place on Tuesday, March 17 this year but in NYC, it’s much bigger than just the official holiday. Celebrations get an early start and run throughout the month with a whopping nine parades dedicated to the holiday (some have already taken place but you still have plenty to choose from). Of course, many of the festivities are known for being raucous and alcohol-fueled, but there are many other ways you can celebrate: from taking a walking tour in the former “Little Ireland” area of the Lower East Side, to learning how to bake Irish soda bread and shamrock macaroons, to getting competitive in an Irish-themed trivia night. Ahead, we rounded up 20 options and none of them involve waking up early to snag a seat at McSorley’s.

Start your planning now!

Policy

New energy code gets tougher on NYC construction

By Alexandra Alexa, Mon, March 2, 2020

Image by Robert Jones from Pixabay

Beginning in May, construction in NYC is going to have to meet stricter sustainability and energy efficiency standards now that the 2020 NYC Energy Conservation Code passed into law last week. Part of the city’s version of the Green New Deal, the new code is just one of several construction regulations that the Department of Buildings is revising, with further updates expected to roll out later in the year.

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Celebrities, Recent Sales, West Village 

68 Bethune Street, Marc Jacobs, West Village, townhouses, Superior Ink

Listing images by Rich Caplan; courtesy of the Ryan Serhant Team at Nest Seekers International

Marc Jacobs’ West Village townhouse had been on the market for almost a year when he relisted the property at 68 Bethune Street with a new agency and a price chop last week. The New York Post reports the property went into contract the very next day, proving that sometimes a price cut makes all the difference. The fashion designer first listed the four-story, nearly 4,800-square-foot home last April for $15.9 million after having purchased it for $10.5 million in 2009. The new listing hit the market at $12 million but the final sale price is still unknown.

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condos, Midtown East, New Developments

Image credit: Noe & Associates/The Boundary

The Waldorf Astoria is still closed for a major renovation, but it appears on track to becoming more luxurious than ever. The latest rendering to be released (which we spotted over on The Post) shows the skylit pool that will be available to residents of the recently branded Towers of the Waldorf Astoria, where 375 condos will be sold for the first time in the history of the storied property.

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Brooklyn, Museums

Photo of the Brooklyn Public Library flagship by Ajay Suresh via Flickr

Two Brooklyn institutions are joining forces to broaden their impact and create “the premiere collection” of archival materials related to the history of the borough. The Brooklyn Public Library (BPL) and Brooklyn Historical Society (BHS) have announced a plan to unify their resources, which was approved by the boards of both organizations this week. The library will serve as the parent institution and the partnership is expected to bring greater financial stability to both while expanding the historical society’s reach through the library’s 59 branches. 

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Cool Listings, Harlem, Interiors

Common, Common Robinson, Striver's Row, 267 West 139th Street, Harlem, coliving

Photos by Seth Caplan for Common

Co-living startup Common has opened its third Harlem location in the St. Nicholas Historic District, better known as Strivers’ Row for the long list of African American luminaries who lived along the two-block stretch. Common brings its modern approach to the area, with a handful of private bedrooms now available at 267 West 139th Street from $1,600 to $2,200 a month.

Take a look around

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