Blog Archives →

Architecture, New Developments, Red Hook

150 Mill Street, Albo Liberis, Red Hook office building

All concept renderings via Albo Liberis

Unusual and flashy aren’t words that come to mind when describing the industrial architecture of Red Hook, but a new proposal from the architects at Albo Liberis wants to infuse some colorful personality into the relatively sleepy waterfront ‘hood. First spotted by CityRealty, the firm published renderings for a kaleidescope-looking, glassy office building at 150 Mill Street, right next to the BQE and less than a five-minute walk from Ikea and the NYC Ferry stop. And though the renderings are merely conceptual at this point (no permits have been filed), they certainly think outside the box, complete with a festive roof deck, their signature diaganal angles, and ground-floor retail.

More renderings right this way

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Red Hook

168 Coffey Street, Red Hook rowhouse, brick house Red Hook

What Red Hook lacks in accessibility it certainly makes up for in charm, and this lovely two-family rowhouse at 168 Coffey Street is definitely worth some extra travel time. Built in 1867 as one of seven similar houses on the cobblestone block, it boasts a brick facade, quaint front garden, and a large backyard. Plus, if you don’t mind commuting on the open seas, the $2.5 million home is just five blocks from the NYC Ferry stop.

Get a look

Cool Listings, Interiors, Red Hook

71 Dikeman Street, Cool Listings, Brooklyn, Red Hook, Townhouses, Outdoor space

Topanga Canyon retreat? Stinson Beach surf shack? If you guessed either you’d be wrong, but this fully-detached single-family home at 71 Dikeman Street in Red Hook, asking $2.5 million, definitely has a California bohemian vibe that’s perfect for the laid-back waterfront neighborhood. In addition to a well-executed renovation, the two-story house has a 50-foot landscaped garden with an outdoor kitchen that’s the picture of summer leisure living.

Tour this laid-back beach shack

Policy, Red Hook

Flooding during Hurricane Sandy left many residents of Red Hook without basic services for weeks. While many had hoped the city’s $100 million initiative would help protect the Brooklyn waterfront neighborhood from a 100-year flood event, a new feasibility study shows the plan would actually only protect it from a 10-year flood event. As the Wall Street Journal reported, the city plans on scaling back the flood-protection system in Red Hook because of its high costs, and the study revealed a larger project could cost about $300 to $500 million more.

Find out more

Architecture, Cool Listings, Red Hook

While we’re used to seeing headline-stealing buildings from innovative design firm SHoP ArchitectsBarclays Center, the American Copper Buildings, and what will be Brooklyn’s tallest tower, to name a modest few–we don’t see SHoP-designed townhouses every day. This particular two-family home at 87 Dikeman Street in the heart of creative and laid-back Red Hook has at least four bedrooms and consists of an owners’ triplex and a rental unit plus a garden and off-street parking. But it’s the home’s design that will likely attract the most attention, with an exterior comprised of zinc panels juxtaposed with polar white concrete planks and accented by a hardwood slat screen and full-height peerless windows. This 3,080-square-foot home, its innovative design–and design pedigree–can be yours for $3.15 million.

Tour this unique Brooklyn home

Cool Listings, Interiors, Red Hook

This three-family brick townhouse comes from Brooklyn’s waterfront neighborhood of Red Hook. The area is known for its striking views of the Lower Manhattan skyline, and the listing promises those same views from the top floor of this home, located at 371 Van Brunt Street. Add in tin ceilings and fireplaces throughout the lower levels, and the historic property, now on the market for $2.5M, is sure to charm.

Time to check it out

Featured Story

Art, City Living, Features

The 10 best neighborhoods for New York City artists

By Devin Gannon, Tue, April 4, 2017

Like most things in New York, creative communities come and ago as new development and rising rents force artists to move on to the next best, or cheaper neighborhood. While 6sqft found ‘hoods like the Upper East Side, Harlem and Long Island City to be the best places for artists a few years back, we’ve updated our top-10 list to reflect the changing times. Ahead you’ll find some areas you may expect–Sunset Park and Bushwick, for example, along with more up-and-coming artsy enclaves like Newark, Washington Heights, and the South Bronx.

The full list right this way

affordable housing, Green Design, Urban Design

KPF, Lily Pad design, Red Hook Houses

When Superstorm Sandy hit the community of Red Hook, thousands of residents were left without power and basic necessities for over two weeks. The neighborhood’s infrastructure suffered substantial damage, with almost all basement mechanical rooms destroyed. In an effort to rebuild Brooklyn’s largest housing development, Red Hook Houses, post-Sandy, the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) commissioned a project by architecture firm Kohn Pederson Fox (KPF). Their “Lily Pad” design includes installing 14 “utility pods” that deliver heat and electricity to each building, as well as creating raised earth mounds to act as a flood barrier (h/t Archpaper).

Find out more here

Cool Listings, Interiors, Red Hook

A unique property in a unique neighborhood has hit the market for a cool $1.9 million. 97 King Street, in the waterfront neighborhood of Red Hook, is a newer construction building inspired by the carriage house design. The three-story property holds a 270-square-foot garage on the ground floor–currently home to the textile company Artemisia–and living space above. It’s topped with an impressive roof deck that looks over Lower Manhattan and the surrounding waterfront.

Go inside

Architecture, Construction Update, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

red hoek point waterfront rendering, norman foster red hook

In October 6sqft reported that work on Thor Equities‘ 7.7-acre waterfront office and retail complex, architect Norman Foster‘s first Brooklyn commission, had begun. A recent meeting between the developers’ representatives and community members to discuss plans for the 818,000-square-foot two-building project on the former site of Red Hook’s Revere Sugar Refinery–known as Red Hoek Point–revealed concerns that the Red Hook community is being excluded from development plans.

Find out more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.