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Art, Long Island City, Policy

5Pointz, graffiti museum, Long Island City developments, aerosol art

Photo by Ezmosis on Wikimedia

An appeals court on Thursday upheld a $6.75 million judgement against a real estate developer who whitewashed 5Pointz, the former graffiti-covered complex in Long Island City. The 32-page decision confirms the decision made by the Federal District Court in 2018 that said developer Jerry Wolkoff of the Wolkoff Group illegally destroyed the building’s colorful murals. In 2014, Wolkoff razed the iconic graffitied warehouse, which had been visible from passing trains since the 90s as a studio and exhibition space for artists. The artists, who unsuccessfully attempted to sue to stop the demolition, filed a second lawsuit in 2015 against Wolkoff, claiming their artwork was of “recognized stature” and protected by the Visual Rights Act.

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Cool Listings, Long Island City

Listing images by Rare Photography; courtesy of Compass

From its location on the fourth floor, this waterfront condo at 46-30 Center Boulevard in Long Island City (the same building that recently held the neighborhood’s priciest listing) directly overlooks the iconic Pepsi Cola sign. Seeking $1,698,000, the two-bedroom pad spans a generous 1,160 square feet. Common charges will add another $995 to the monthly payments, but due to a pilot tax abatement program, taxes for the property are only $13 a month.

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Long Island City

Streetview of the library; Map data © 2020 Google

A popular public library in Queens is shutting its doors next month. The Queens Public Library at Court Square, located at 25-01 Jackson Avenue in Long Island City, will close sometime in February after occupying the ground floor of the Citigroup Building for more than 30 years. The library faced threats of eviction after Amazon pulled out of its plan to move its headquarters to the neighborhood last year, which included its lease agreement at One Court Square.

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Cool Listings, Long Island City

27-28 Thomson Avenue, Arris Lofts, Long Island City, LIC, cool listings, lofts

Photo credit: Al Seidman courtesy of Compass

The lofts at the former Eagle Electric Manufacturing Factory at 27-28 Thomson Avenue in Long Island City, built in 1920, are uncompromisingly authentic, while the full-service Arris Lofts condo conversion benefits from the kind of impressive amenities for which the Queens neighborhood is known. Occupying 1,725 square feet of flexible living space with a bedroom, a home office, and two full baths, this generously-sized residence is quiet and sunny, configured with modern living in mind. It’s asking $1.49 million.

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Long Island City, Policy, Queens

Photo © Paul Warchol

A disability rights group filed a lawsuit on Tuesday that claims a new public library in Queens does not provide full access for those with mobility disabilities. The civil suit, filed by the Center for Independence of the Disabled New York and the Disability Rights Advocates (DRA), says the newly constructed Hunters Point Library in Long Island City, which took nearly a decade to build and cost more than $41 million, violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). While the library opened in September to praise from architecture critics for its innovative design, visitors immediately criticized the building’s third level fiction section, accessible only by stairs.

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City Living, Long Island City

The Collective, Paper Factory, Long Island City, Co-living

Images courtesy of The Collective

London-based co-living company The Collective has opened its first U.S. location at the former Paper Factory Hotel in Long Island City. Designed in collaboration with Palette Architecture, the 125-room location will focus on a “short stay” model ranging from one-night to 29-day stays. Members will have access to communal living areas and wellness services, as well as a soon-to-launch restaurant and cultural programming. The company already has plans to expand on today’s opening by adding 100 additional rooms on top of the existing building by 2021. 

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Construction Update, Long Island City, Major Developments, Queens

Rendering: Binyan Studios.

Skyline Tower in Long Island City, Queens, has officially become the city’s tallest building outside of Manhattan. The luxury condo tower has now topped out at 778 feet. As 6sqft recently reported, the 67-story building surpassed its neighbor and previous record-holder, the 673-foot-tall Citigroup Building, in September. Located at 23-15 44th Drive, the new Long Island City tower will offer about 800 studio to four-bedroom condominium apartments, priced between $500,000 and $4 million.

But it won’t hold the title for long

Bushwick, Long Island City, Policy, Staten Island

Photo via Joe MabelWiki Commons

New Yorkers for Parks has released three new Open Space Index reports, a series of in-depth “neighborhood snapshots” of parks and open space in Staten Island’s Bay Street Corridor, Bushwick, and Long Island City. According to the reports, the Bay Street Corridor failed 11 of 14 open space goals, Bushwick failed 12 of 14, and Long Island City failed 11 of 14. The goals factor in characteristics including the total amount of open space, access, tree canopy, and overall maintenance. According to the City’s own standards, all of the neighborhoods lack sufficient open space and what does exist is often hard to get to or improperly maintained.

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Architecture, Long Island City

Photo © Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl’s Hunters Point Library has garnered glowing architectural reviews since it’s opening last month, but visitors quickly pointed out a critical issue with accessibility in the $41 million building. Although the library has an elevator, it doesn’t stop at the fiction section which is tiered on three levels above the lobby and accessible only via stairs. In light of the criticism, a Queens Public Library official has announced that books in that section will be relocated to an accessible area of the library, as Gothamist reported.

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Architecture, Design, Long Island City

Photo © Paul Warchol

Despite standing just 82 feet tall, the new Hunters Point Library manages to stand out among its skyscraper neighbors on the Long Island City waterfront. The concrete structure, designed by Steven Holl Architects, officially opened to the public Tuesday, about two decades after officials proposed building a new Queens Public Library branch. The delays, and the whopping $40 million price tag, appear to have been worth it, as the building, with its carved windows and incredible skyline views, continues to garner approval from top architecture critics.

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