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condos, Construction Update, Long Island City, New Developments

Court Square City View, Long Island City

Via Hill West Architects

The soaring condo tower planned for Long Island City’s Court Square shrunk in height this week, dropping from a proposed 984-foot tower to 778 feet, Curbed NY reported. This isn’t the first height fluctuation for the building, dubbed the Court Square City View. Developer Chris Xu proposed a 964-foot tower in 2016, bumped it to supertall status at 984 feet in 2017 and now, according to the WSJ, the tower will rise just under 780 feet. Despite reducing in height by more than 200 feet, the tower will still be the tallest building in Queens upon completion.

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Art, Long Island City

Photo by Pablo Enriquez

In MoMA PS1’s temporary exhibit at its sprawling outdoor courtyard in Long Island City, people become the art. Hide & Seek, created by Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers of Dream The Combine, features moveable mirrors that offer surprising and dislocating perspectives of the courtyard and the crowd looking into them. Newsome and Carruthers were named the winners of the 2018 Young Architects Program, which challenges emerging architects to design a creative, sustainable outdoor installation. Hide & Seek will be on view at MoMA PS1 between June 28 and September 3.

See the exhibit

Landscape Architecture, Long Island City

Photo © 6sqft

The Hunter’s Point South Park extension officially opened Wednesday, over three years after construction began at the Long Island City site. The second phase adds 5.5 acres south to the existing park, which currently has a basketball court, playground, two dog-runs, and a volleyball sand pit. The city’s Economic Development Corporation and Department of Parks and Recreation developed the project, which measures 11-acres from 50th Avenue to Newton Creek on the East River.

At the ribbon-cutting ceremony, local officials and community members gathered to celebrate the project’s opening. “This is a beautiful park,” State Sen. Michael Gianaris said. “Enough to make our friends across in Manhattan look over and be jealous that they don’t have anything as beautiful on their side of the River.”

More here

affordable housing, housing lotteries, Queens

Rendering via HAAK architects

Applications are now being accepted for 59 newly constructed, middle-income units in the heart of thriving Long Island City in Queens. HAAK architects designed the 12-story building at 11-39 49th Avenue, which boasts a unique patchwork facade made of tricolor brick. The rental sits less than a block from the 7 train and MoMA PS1 and less than a mile from Gantry Plaza State Park on the waterfront. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the units, which range from a $2,098/month studio to a $3,131/month three-bedroom.

Find out if you qualify

Greenpoint, Long Island City, Urban Design

Rendering via CRÈME / Jun Aizaki Architecture and Design

A Kickstarter campaign launched on Thursday for a civic design project aimed at reconnecting the neighborhoods of Greenpoint and Long Island City and the residents who live there. Brooklyn-based studio CRÈME/ Jun Aizaki Architecture & Design’s concept, called Timber Bridge at LongPoint Corridor, calls for constructing a floating bridge made of durable timber that would sit on Newtown Creek and expand past to the LIRR rail yard in LIC. Not only would it provide people greater access to transit options, according to the design team, Timber Bridge would give bikers and pedestrians a safer commute than the Pulaski Bridge, a less-than-ideal path with lots of cars.

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Cool Listings, Long Island City, Quirky Homes

A listing broker for this 1848 former local firehouse told the Wall Street Journal that its $5.5 million asking price was “aspirational,” but the neighborhood certainly has changed since its owner purchased the three-story, 3,500 square-foot converted townhouse in 1981 for $115,000. Long Island City turned fancy and this Federal-style firehouse got an architect-led overhaul that gave it three bedrooms, a 17-foot vaulted ceiling, a home office/library, a garden, a terrace, a garage, an elevator, and a sliding glass wall.

Hop in the elevator, take the tour

Featured Story

Features, photography, Queens, The urban lens

Kris Graves

Condo Construction, Long Island City, New York, 2008 © Kris Graves

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Kris Graves shares photos from his “A Queens Affair“. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Queens-born photographer Kris Graves has been shooting his series “A Queens Affair” since 2005. Recently, he published a limited edition and currently sold-out softcover book, LOST LIC, containing some of his thousands of shots of the borough. A hater of glass, he describes his motives to take photos of LIC simply: he wants to capture the rapidly disappearing nooks and crannies of the neighborhood before they’re gone forever. While some of his previous work, including photos of every police precinct in New York, have been comprehensive, with “A Queens Affair,” Graves admits he does not know if the project will ever truly be complete.

The landscapes in many of his photos have already changed drastically

Long Island City, Major Developments, Queens, Rentals

Rendering courtesy of Durst Organization via SkyscraperPage

After picking up the Long Island City property for $173.5 million in 2016, the Durst Organization released this week the first rendering of its massive mixed-use building planned for 29-37 41st Avenue. Dubbed Queens Plaza Park, the 978,000-square-foot tower will hold 958 rental residences, as well as retail and office space. The rendering reveals a concave-shaped building which will wrap around the 90-year old landmarked Clock Tower, which is being saved and restored, as CityRealty reported.

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Landscape Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments

hunters point south, hunters point south park

Photo by David Lloyd/SWA

Long Island City is getting five more glorious acres of waterfront park space, with the city expected to complete Hunters Point South Park in the coming months. The second phase of the park, which stretches below 54th Avenue and wraps around Newtown Creek, is nearing completion after three years under construction, according to LIC Post. The city’s Economic Development Corporation says the opening date will come by late spring or early summer, so New Yorkers will have a whole new outdoor amenity to enjoy when the weather warms up.

The park has tons of cool features

Art, Long Island City, New Developments, Policy

5Pointz, graffiti museum, Long Island City developments, aerosol art

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

A federal judge in Brooklyn ruled Monday that the destruction of work by 21 graffiti artists at the Long Island City complex known as 5Pointz had enough recognized stature to warrant legal protection–to the tune of $6.7 million, the New York Times reports. The judgement was awarded following a landmark Federal District Court trial in November, when a civil jury concluded that real estate developer Jerry Wolkoff of Wolkoff Group broke the law when he whitewashed the building of its colorful murals under cover of night. As 6sqft previously reported, the iconic graffiti-covered warehouse, visible from passing trains since its beginnings in the 1990s as an artists’ studio and exhibition space, was razed to replaced by rental apartments–using the name 5Pointz as a marketing angle–by Wolkoff, who has owned the building on Jackson Avenue since the 1970s. Wolkoff, who claims he cried when the building came down, now has further reason to weep: The judge’s ruling awarded the artists the maximum possible damages.

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