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affordable housing, Long Island City, Policy

Rendering of Plaxall’s proposed, but not yet approved, mixed-use LIC project courtesy of WXY architecture + urban design

A plan to create 1,500 units of affordable housing in the Anable Basin area of Long Island City will most likely be scrapped, as Amazon prepares to open its headquarters on that same land, Politico reported. Amazon announced this week plans to bring its second headquarters to the Queens neighborhood on land currently owned by plastics company Plaxall, as well as some parcels owned by New York City. Previous plans from Plaxall and the city, who hired developer TF Cornerstone to build a mixed-use campus at the site, called for 1,250 and 250 units of affordable housing, respectively. But an Amazon spokesperson told Politico there will be no housing at its new complex.

Amazon in, affordable housing out

Long Island City, real estate trends

Via Wiki Commons

Amazon’s decision to divide its second headquarters between Long Island City and Arlington, Virginia was confirmed on Tuesday, bringing with it questions about how the neighborhoods will withstand the influx of 25,000 new workers each. According to a new study from RENTCafé, LIC already has an occupancy rate of 98.2% and about 15,400 units currently either under construction or in a planning phase, so Amazon’s announcement is sure to add fuel to an already bustling market. In fact, according to listings site CityRealty, searches for residential apartments in the neighborhood are up 281% compared to the daily averages prior to the announcement.

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Long Island City, Major Developments, More Top Stories, New Developments

Image: Maxpixel CC public domain.

On the heels of news that Amazon has chosen Long Island City, Queens for one of its two new headquarters, making the promise of 25,000 new jobs a hopefully-someday reality, comes the fine print request that the company would like a helipad for its new East River waterfront HQ, please. Slate reports that the request appears deep in a 32-page memorandum of understanding with the city and state.

Rooftop helipads have been banned since 9/11

Long Island City, Major Developments, New Developments, Top Stories

Rendering of Plaxall’s proposed (but not yet approved) mixed-use LIC project courtesy of WXY architecture + urban design

Amazon officially announced on Tuesday its plan to bring its second headquarters to Long Island City, following a 14-month long contest among hundreds of cities across the country. The company will also open a second new headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, with each location expected to house 25,000 new employees; Nashville will become home to Amazon’s “Operations Center of Excellence,” equipped for 5,000 full-time jobs. In Queens, Amazon intends to construct the mixed-use complex across both public and private sites that sit along the East River, in an area known as Anable Basin. Although the HQ2 project still must undergo a public and environmental review, as well as a possible rezoning, the tech company said it will receive over $1.7 billion in incentives from New York State for its project, which is expected to cost over $3.6 billion, and has the potential for another $1.3 billion “as-of-right” benefits from New York City.

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Long Island City, Policy

The state of New York is keeping the incentives it used to woo Amazon under wraps, but even without those benefits, an existing tax program could work in Amazon’s favor — to the tune of almost $1 billion. After a highly publicized search, the tech giant is nearing a deal to locate half of its new headquarters in Long Island City. And as The Real Deal explains, that move means Amazon will qualify for the city’s Relocation and Employment Assistance Program (REAP), which offers employers a $3,000 credit per employee per year for 12 years if they move their business into the outer boroughs and certain parts of Upper Manhattan. With Amazon’s projected workforce of 25,000, that would mean a total credit of $900 million.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, Long Island City

Photo via CityRealty

With speculation about Amazon’s chosen HQ2 cities landing on Long Island City this week, the questions of transportation and affordability in the neighborhood have come to the forefront. And a new affordable housing lottery in the area does not look good for the latter. As of tomorrow, New Yorkers earning 130 percent of the area median income can apply for 10 units at the newly constructed, mixed-use rental 40-05 Crescent Street. Located on the border of Astoria, the building houses 32 rentals, an underground parking garage, and two floors of manufacturing space. The “affordable” units range from $2,125/month studios to $2,741/month two-bedrooms.

See what the qualifications are

Long Island City, New Developments, Policy

Rendering courtesy of WXY architecture + urban design

With Amazon nearing a deal to make Long Island City home to its second headquarters, a big question remains: Where in the Queens neighborhood will the tech-giant house its 25,000 employees? One possible location sits within a waterfront area known as Anable Basin, named for a 150-year-old inlet, sources familiar with the plan told Politico New York. As 6sqft reported last November, the family-owned plastics company Plaxall, who owns the site, proposed a massive rezoning of the area that would allow for 335,000 square feet for industrial spaces, nearly 5,000 housing units, and a new public school.

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Long Island City, Policy

Amazon’s HQ2 could be headed to Long Island City

By Devin Gannon, Tue, November 6, 2018

Via CityRealty

Amazon is close to naming Long Island City home to its second headquarters, following a competitive, yearlong search by the tech giant. The company is reportedly splitting “HQ2” between two locations, with the other being Crystal City, Virginia, a suburb outside of Washington, D.C, according to the New York Times. The news comes less than a week after New York City announced plans to invest $180 million in the infrastructure of the evolving Queens neighborhood.

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Long Island City

Yesterday the de Blasio Administration released the Long Island City Investment Strategy, an effort by the city to support sustainable growth in the waterfront neighborhood. Following an upzoning in 2001, the area has seen incredible transformation in the form of thousands of new apartments and waterfront towers. The city admits that the reason behind its strategy is such rapid development, which has strained neighborhood resources and the quality of life of residents.

$180 million is designated for the area, which is on top of $2.2 billion the city says its already invested over the years. “We are investing $180 million in Long Island City to address the needs of today while preparing for a more sustainable future.” Mayor de Blasio stated in a press release.

Where will the money go?

condos, Long Island City, New Developments

Via Hill West Architects

Skyline Tower at 23-15 44th Drive in Long Island City, Queens, just got approved to begin sales, with a marketing plan that estimates a $1.088 billion sellout price, making the 66-story condominium the first in the borough to break the one billion mark, Bloomberg reports. The milestone isn’t the only superlative for the building, formerly known as Court Square City View. The 778-foot tower is on a course to become the borough’s tallest building.

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