Women’s History Month

Art, Events

Instead of hitting the bars this Friday night, check out the “Library After Hours” event at the main branch of the New York Public Library. On select Fridays, the landmarked library hosts a party after closing that lets guests mingle with food and drinks, music, and a behind-the-scenes look at some of their collections. This Friday, March 31st, the library is holding the event, “Women Marching Through History,” to coincide with the last day of Women’s History Month, where guests can admire feminist manuscripts, rare books, photographs, artwork, and films as well as participate in an interactive project to record one’s own story about living through this time in women’s history.

Find out more here

History, maps

In honor of Women’s History Month, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation has added more notable female figures to their Civil Rights and Social Justice Map. You can now explore sites such as the now-demolished building where Hellen Keller wrote for “The Masses,” learn more about Mine Okubo’s struggle to expose the cruelty of Japanese internment camps through her artwork kept in the East Village, and visit the home of Clara Lemlich, a feminist who demanded thousands of shirtwaist factory workers go on strike to demand better working conditions and higher wages.

See the interactive map here

Featured Story

Events, Features, History

Suffragists outside the White House. Credit Harris & Ewing, via Library of Congress

Now celebrated worldwide during the month of March, the observance originated in New York City in 1909 as “Women’s Day,” on February 28 to mark the anniversary of the city’s garment industry strike led by the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union one year prior. The Socialist Party of America chose the day to honor the women who bravely protested miserable labor conditions. American Socialist and feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman addressed a New York crowd, saying, “It is true that a woman’s duty is centered in her home and motherhood but home should mean the whole country and not be confined to three or four rooms of a city or a state.” At the time, women still couldn’t vote.

Honor history, make history

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