Whitney Museum

Featured Story

Features, History, Meatpacking District

As we all await the opening of the new building of the Whitney Museum for American Art in May, it might be interesting to see what’s underneath it—or was.

There’s an old saying, “To create, you must first destroy,” and so long as it doesn’t specify how much of one and how good the other, the statement generally slips by without challenge. So it was with the Whitney’s new site along the High Line in the Meatpacking District. There wasn’t a lot that needed to be destroyed. There was, however, this little building, the Gansevoort Pumping Station, a small, classically inspired edifice with arches separated by pilasters. It was designed by Michael and Mitchell Bernstein, brothers who were widely known for turn of the twentieth-century tenements. Designed in 1906 and completed in 1908, it was built as a pumphouse for high-pressure fire service by the City of New York and later served as one of the area’s quintessential meat markets.

Read the entire history of the site here

Featured Story

Features, History, Meatpacking District

Why is it called the Meatpacking District when there are only six meat packers there, down from about 250?  Inertia, most likely. The area has seen so many different uses over time, and they’re so often mercantile ones that Gansevoort Market would probably be a better name for it.

Located on the shore of the Hudson River, it’s a relatively small district in Manhattan stretching from Gansevoort Street at the foot of the High Line north to and including West 14th Street and from the river three blocks east to Hudson Street. Until its recent life as a go-to high fashion mecca, it was for almost 150 years a working market: dirty, gritty, and blood-stained.

Read the full history here

Daily Link Fix

  • Check out this Harlem brownstone where a teacher and a perfumer live. [Design Sponge]
  • To get these amazing aerial photographs of NYC, the artist hung out of a helicopter flying at 7,500 feet. [Gizmodo]
  • Good news for independent book stores; Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks will reopen in an East Village rowhouse. [Jeremiah’s Vanishing NY]
  • In preparation for its big move to the High Line, the Whitney Museum expanded its online database from 700 to 21,000 works. [Hyperallergic]
  • Mohammed is the most common New York taxi driver name. [CityLab]

Images: Aerial photo via Vincent Laforet (L); Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks via Jae-eun Chung (R)

Architecture, condos, New Developments, Upper East Side

Old Whitney Building, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Daniel Straus, Marcel Breuer

All eyes have been on the construction of Renzo Piano‘s new downtown home for the Whitney Museum, set to open in May. But let’s not forget about what’s happening to the Whitney’s old Marcel Breuer-designed building on Madison Avenue and 75th Street. The Brutalist building opened in 1966 and has since dominated its Upper East Side surroundings. It’s set to be taken over as a satellite location for the Metropolitan Museum of Art to showcase their contemporary and modern art collections when it reopens in March 2016. And though the Met will not alter the façade of the landmarked museum building, its surroundings will certainly look different than in the Whitney’s days.

The biggest changes are happening right next door, where the row of six 19th-century Italianate and Greek Revival brownstones on Madison Avenue and two townhouses on East 74th Street are being reimagined as condos and retail space by developer and healthcare entrepreneur Daniel Straus, who bought the properties from the Whitney in 2010 for $95 million and subsequently was granted approval by the Landmarks Preservation Commission for their new design by Beyer Blinder Belle. According to the Times, who profiled the development, the flurry of construction could be considered “the Met effect.”

More on the development here

Daily Link Fix

Renzo Piano, Whitney Museum
  • The Whitney Museum of American Art’s new Renzo Piano-designed building along the High Line will open in May. [NY Times]
  • Historic photos of the New York garbage strike of 1911. [The Bowery Boys]
  • SantaCon’s not going to Bushwick after all. The organizers said the neighborhood “does not have the capacity to be an appropriate destination for this year’s celebration.” [am NY]
  • The Street Museum of Art is taking over boring billboards with unique street art. [Bowery Boogie]
  • A round up of 3D-printed holiday gifts. [Mashable]

Images: New Whitney via Timothy Schenck (L); Street art billboard via Street Museum of Art (R)

Real Estate Wire

east new york resident, east new york
  • Residents of East New York react to the city’s revitalization plan for their neighborhood. [WSJ]
  • A developer’s best friends: The father and son law team who have worked for decades to secure changes to properties’ permitted use or size. [WSJ]
  • Renzo Piano’s design for the new Whitney Museum along the High Line is almost complete. [Curbed]
  • A map of non-profit organizations that have sold off their buildings for large sums to residential developers. [Curbed]
  • The Sultan of Brunei is not interested in buying a London or New York hotel, after all. [TRD]
  • What the 7-story luxury residential development on Attorney Street will look like. [Bowery Boogie]

Images © Wall Street Journal

Chelsea, Cool Listings, Interiors, Meatpacking District, Starchitecture

100 Eleventh Avenue interiors, Jean Nouvel building, Jennifer Post interior renovation

Starchitect Jean Nouvel’s 100 Eleventh Avenue may have received mixed reviews—which is made even more evident when you look at its rocky listing history—but that doesn’t change the fact that this pad is a clear showstopper. Not only does the stunning full-floor penthouse offer 360 degrees of stellar views through 150 linear feet of floor-to-ceiling windows; have a sprawling layout and two terraces; and reside on one of New York’s most recognizable blocks, surrounded by buildings designed by Pritzker Prize winners like Frank Gehry and Shigeru Ban; but this unit also has recently renovated interiors courtesy of Jennifer Post, one of Architectural Digest’s top 100 designers. Bottom line, if you’re a big name-dropper, this $45,000/month rental has your name written all over it.

Check out the views from this incredible home here

Interiors, Recent Sales, Upper East Side

35 East 76th St. #3006, Hotel Carlyle Aerie, amazing views

After what appears to be a long, intensive history on and off the market with a few price drops, unit 3006 at the Hotel Carlyle Aerie has finally sold, according to city records. Always a bridesmaid, never a bride might be a fitting way to look at this co-op, as it appears to have been on the market for a year and a half, eventually dropping their asking price from $7.75 million to $4.9 million, and ultimately settling in at a $4.5 million sales price. But one look at the living/dining room (and an aptly placed telescope by the window) makes it clear that the star of this apartment is the amazing views. As Mastercard would say, those views are priceless.

Take a look inside here

Art, Design, Events

Museum of Art and Design, Mad Biennial, PS1 Warm up, Beverly's, Dance Art Video III, Parallelograms, Leah Beeferman, Matthew Harvey, Whitney Museum, Air France, Seeking space, Active Space, Purple States & Cafe Dancer Pop-up, Sam Gordon, Andrew Edlin Gallery, Dj Small Change, Rubin Art Museum, Rockefeller Center, Jeff Koons

We welcome this second week of summer with open arms as the warm weather we’ve been oh so patiently waiting for brings with it plenty of amazing art and design events happening outdoors (and in). This week, Jeff Koons descends upon New York, first hitting up Rockefeller Center with his giant living floral sculpture, Split Rocker, then rounding out this verdant new work with a full on retrospective at the Whitney’s Upper East Side Breuer Building.

But if you just want to relax and recline (literally), Air France will be kicking off the weekend by bringing a little bit of Paris to New York. Three days of French flavor are planned for anyone who wants to partake, and guests will get to indulge in delicious food and drink and even take French lessons while lounging in one of Air France’s first class chairs. C’est bon!

All the best events here

Interiors, Recent Sales, Upper East Side

830 Park Ave drawing room

Wall Street banker Brian Kelly and his wife Robin Foley have just purchased a gorgeous Upper East Side duplex at 830 Park Avenue for $8.495 million. Apartment 9/10B is reminiscent of a home in an Edith Wharton novel, which is appropriate because it’s managed to maintain much of its early 20th century charm even as it boasts some of the most modern finishes.

Check out this beautiful duplex here

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