Keith Haring

Art, City Living

Keith Haring, Crack is Wack, Murals, East Harlem, Restoration

Images courtesy of NYC Parks

After a couple of months of work, Keith Haring’s iconic “Crack is Wack” mural in East Harlem is now fully restored. As 6sqft previously reported, Haring painted the 16-foot by 26-foot mural on a handball court at East 128th Street and the Harlem River Drive in 1986 to draw attention to the crack cocaine epidemic. Composed with the artist’s signature kinetic figures and bold abstract forms, the piece has been celebrated as one of his most important works. It was refurbished and repainted by artists Louise Hunnicutt and William Tibbals, with support from the Keith Haring Foundation.

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Art, City Living

Keith Haring, Crack is Wack

Image via Flickr

It’s been 33 years since Keith Haring painted his “Crack is Wack” mural on a handball court near the Harlem River Drive in East Harlem, and now the iconic work is getting a much-needed restoration, as amNY reported. Inspired by his studio assistant Benny—who was struggling with addiction but later recovered—Haring painted the 16-foot by 26-foot mural on June 27, 1986, at the height of the crack cocaine epidemic and intended the piece to function as a warning to young users. Celebrated as one of Haring’s most important works, the mural has been shielded by protective coverings in recent years during reconstruction work on the Harlem River Drive.

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Featured Story

East Village, Features, GVSHP, History, Noho

23 LGBT landmarks of the East Village and Noho

By Andrew Berman of Village Preservation, Mon, June 17, 2019

Their neighbor to the west Greenwich Village may be more well known as a nexus for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history, but the East Village and Noho are chock full of LGBT culture as well, from the site of one the very first LGBT demonstrations to the homes of some of the greatest openly-LGBT artists and writers of the 20th century to the birthplace of New York’s largest drag festival. Ahead, we round up 23 examples, from Walt Whitman’s favorite watering hole to Allen Ginsberg’s many local residences to Keith Haring’s studio.

Learn the history of all the spots

Cool Listings, Interiors, Tribeca

Image credit: Tim Waltman

This 8,000 square-foot Tribeca triplex in the American Thread Building contains a unique New York City treasure: An original Keith Haring mural, made in 1978 during the late artist’s days at SVA when the space was a student gallery. But the massive loft is itself a treasure: Occupying the lower floors of the classic, landmarked building at 260 West Broadway–it was among the first of Tribeca’s luxury condo conversions–the loft combines modern finishes with pre-war authenticity, plus the amenities of a condominium. 6sqft featured the listing in 2016 when it was asking $13 million, which was apparently too steep for potential treasure-seekers. The home was just re-listed at $9.999 million.

Take another look

Art, Cool Listings, Interiors, Tribeca

260 west broadway

This Tribeca triplex is a treasure for many reasons. Its size, for one; it occupies an insane 8,000 square feet of the classic, landmarked American Thread Building (among the first of Tribeca’s luxury condo conversions) at 260 West Broadway. Possibly the most memorable reason is an original Keith Haring mural, made in 1978 during the late artist’s days at SVA when the space was a student gallery, painted on a curving wall of the apartment’s main-floor entry gallery.

Priced at a treasure-worthy $13 million, it isn’t the property’s first time to this rodeo. As with downtown Manhattan, this amazing loft has seen quite a few changes in the new millennium. The three-story unit was previously listed as #mais and #1/2C; the three story “maisonette” is TH1 in its newest incarnation.

Tour this fabulous loft

Cool Listings, Greenwich Village, Historic Homes, Interiors

230 West 10th Street, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, carriage house, townhouse, Greenwich Village, Jean Lignel, Art Collector, Jeffrey Flanigan, Keith Haring, Warhol, Ida Applebroog, Manhattan townhouse for sale

Purchased in 1996 for $950,000 by French music producer, newspaper publisher, entrepreneur and passionate lifelong art collector Jean Lignel, this West Village carriage house received a renovation by architect Jeffrey Flanigan that transformed the 1834 landmark into both a family home and a made-to-order art gallery with 6,700 interior square feet and 1,825 square feet of outdoor space. Lignel’s collection includes many works by Keith Haring, Warhol, and celebrated contemporary artist (and mother of filmmaker Beth B) Ida Applebroog among many others. In addition to being able to showcase large art pieces, modern conveniences–like an elevator and a garage–abound.

Lignel first listed this “West Village Arthouse” (as the current listing calls it) in 2007 for a whopping $20 million, possibly fresh from its extensive–and no doubt expensive–renovation. Since then, the home has been on and off the market, with broker swaps and price chops happening each time. In this latest go-round, the three-story historic home with an artistic pedigree is listed at $14.5 million.

Take a look inside this private gallery and family home

Art, Bushwick

Owen Dippie, Renaissance Masters, Ninjas Turtles, Radiant Madonna, Keith Haring

Owen Dippie is starting a modern renaissance in Brooklyn. Within the past couple of months, the New Zealand-born street artist has put up two pieces in Bushwick that skillfully remix the work of the Renaissance masters and contemporary art and culture. Dippie’s clever pieces appeal to art lovers of all styles.

For Dippie, creating these mashups is like paying homage to his idols. Growing up, Dippie’s biggest influences were Biggie Smalls, Tupac Shakur, Michael Jackson, Andy Warhol, Basquiat and Keith Haring. As he grew older and became more exposed to other artists, the Renaissance masters began to grow on him as well. With such varying influences, it makes sense for Dippie to have created these pieces.

See the stunning mashups here

Featured Story

Art, East Village, Features, Interviews, New Yorker Spotlight, People

New York Central Art Supply, Steve Steinberg, Doug Steinberg, NYC art supply store

In 1905, Benjamin Steinberg opened up a store on Third Avenue between 10th and 11th Streets. Little did he know then that one day artists like Willem de Kooning would walk through its doors.

For the last 110 years, New York Central Art Supply has served the needs of New York’s amateur and professional artists. Three generations of the Steinberg family have supplied paper, paints, brushes, and canvases to everyone from first-year art students to Keith Haring. And over the last year, Doug Steinberg, Benjamin’s great-grandson, has taken a more active role at New York Central, planning for the store’s future. While Doug never formally joined the family business (he currently owns and runs his own company), New York Central has been a constant in his life. He says he’s worked there “on and off since I was born,” and has a deep appreciation for what his great-grandfather started and his father Steve grew in the ’60s and ’70s.

We recently spoke with Doug to learn about New York Central’s rich history, why so many well-known artists purchased and continue to purchase supplies here, and how the store is preparing for its 21st century evolution.

Read the interview right here

Daily Link Fix

whole foods, registers, grocery store, natural grocery store, organic grocery store
  • Keith Haring’s six-story Statue of Liberty mural is going up for auction. [NYP]
  • Turns out there is some validity to the “Whole Paycheck” nickname for Whole Foods. The grocery store has been overcharging for pre-packaged foods. [Gothamist]
  • Past and present: Manhattan Beach’s “Apartcot” bungalow colony. [Brownstoner]
  • According to an interview with real estate investor Aby Rosen, when Jay Maisel moved out of 190 Bowery, he left behind a 26-year collection of Playboy and Hustler magazines, as well as a collection of 5,000 screwdrivers, all lined up. [New Yorker]
  • The creator of the pink plastic lawn flamingo has passed away at age 79. [Guardian]

Images: Whole Foods (L); 190 Bowery (R)

Daily Link Fix

Renzo Piano, Whitney Museum
  • To help cover increased costs at their new $422 million Renzo Piano-designed home, the Whitney Museum will raise ticket prices from $20 to $22. [NYT]
  • Katie Holmes had a secret underground entrance to the Whole Foods at the Chelsea Mercantile building. [Gawker]
  • New Keith Haring exhibit at TBD Gallery on Allen Street goes back to the artist’s roots. [Bowery Boogie]
  • Is your ‘hood sudsy or dry? Mapping NYC’s neighborhood laundromats. [BU]
  • Ten things you didn’t know about Central Park. [HuffPo]
  • Frank Sinatra’s recording studio has been recreated at the New York Public Library for Performing Arts. [Untapped]

Images: New Whitney Museum (L); Laundromat via Mother Speed via photopin (license)(R)

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