Cetra/Ruddy

affordable housing, Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn

Rendering of 22 Chapel Street courtesy of CetraRuddy

After breaking ground last month, the mixed-use development at 22 Chapel Street near the Manhattan Bridge now has more details to share. Designed by CetraRuddy, the 20-story tower will bring 180 rental units to Downtown Brooklyn, 45 of which will be affordable. Among other amenities, it will have a rooftop pool and terrace, along with ground-floor retail space and a new headquarters for the START organization. Completion is expected in 2021.

More details

Architecture, Events, Giveaways

Photo by James and Karla Murray exclusively for 6sqft

It’s your chance to get a behind-the-scenes look at one of New York City’s most impressive architecture firms. 6sqft and Untapped Cities are joining forces to offer tours of studios of the city’s top architectural and design firms. In the most recent installment, you can tour the Financial District studio of CetraRuddy, the firm behind the tower One Madison, Tribeca’s 443 Greenwich Street, and the Lincoln Square Synagogue. Led by principals at the firm, the tour takes participants through the office, explaining their sustainable interiors and usage of technology. For a chance to win a pair of tickets, enter our raffle below!

How to enter

Architecture, condos, Cool Listings, New Developments, Nomad

In March, Rockefeller Group, the famous developers behind their eponymous Rockefeller Center, announced that they’d be building their first residential project in their 90-year history. Dubbed Rose Hill for the historic area that once occupied today’s Nomad, the 600-foot tower at 30 East 29th Street is a uniquely modern interpretation of the Art Deco style. Now we have an even better look at this striking bronze facade, as well as the expansive amenity spaces and luxury condo interiors. The new views coincide with sales launching; prices will start at $1.195 million for a studio.

More details and renderings this way

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Financial District, Where I Work

6sqft’s series “Where I Work” takes us into the studios, offices, and off-beat workspaces of New Yorkers across the city. In this installment, we’re touring the Battery Park office of architecture-interior design firm CetraRuddy. Want to see your business featured here? Get in touch!

Husband-and-wife team Nancy Ruddy and John Cetra started architecture/design firm CetraRuddy in 1987, and after working from an office in Soho for 25 years, the firm moved to One Battery Park Plaza a year-and-a-half ago. Now with 100 employees, they had outgrown the space and wanted to use the move as an opportunity to revamp and improve the things that didn’t work. They were first attracted to the space’s light and views, but the firm was also able to occupy the entire floor, meaning they could design the entire office space, as well as the corridors.

After recently interviewing Nancy about CetraRuddy’s many successes, 6sqft paid a visit to their new offices, where we received a tour from Eugene Flotteron, Director of Architecture. Eugene has been with the firm for 17 years and has been a partner for five, so he’s had the opportunity to see them grow and transform over the years.

Take the tour

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Interviews

nancy ruddy of cetra ruddy

Photo courtesy of CetraRuddy

When Nancy Ruddy and her husband John Cetra formed architecture firm CetraRuddy in 1987, they wanted to “create inspirational spaces and buildings based upon the ideas of craft and the human touch.” Thirty-one years later, and the 100-person firm has achieved this goal and then some, marking the skyline with their soaring One Madison tower, transforming Tribeca’s 443 Greenwich Street into the hottest celebrity residence, and adapting historic buildings by prolific architects such as Ralph Walker and Rosario Candela. They’ve also distinguished themselves by combing architecture and design practices, which was most recently showcased at their designs for the new Time Warner Center restaurant Bluebird London.

Ahead, 6sqft talks with Nancy Ruddy about how all of these successes came to be, where she sees the architectural landscape of NYC heading, and what it was like creating a destination dining space overlooking Central Park.

Hear from Nancy

Architecture, lincoln square, New Developments, Upper West Side 

SJP Properties, Mitsui Fudosan, 200 Amsterdam Avenue, Elkus Manfredi, Lincoln Square, Upper West Side tower

Despite some initial construction hiccups, plans for the 668-foot residential tower at 200 Amsterdam Avenue continue to move forward. According to YIMBY, the tower’s developers, SJP Properties and Mitsui Fudosan, have unveiled new renderings of the Upper West Side building, including an up-close shot of its crown. Designed by Elkus Manfredi, the exteriors feature an aluminum curtainwall and metal panels. New York firm CetraRuddy will take on the interiors of the 112-unit condominium building.

More this way

affordable housing, Hell's Kitchen, housing lotteries, Midtown West

Rendering of 572 Eleventh Avenue courtesy of the Moinian Group

A CetraRuddy-designed building at 572 Eleventh Avenue is now accepting applications for 46 newly constructed, mixed-income studios, one- and two-bedroom apartments. Developed by the Moinian Group, the Hell’s Kitchen rental, which recently topped out this June, rises 13 stories high and features 10,000 square feet of commercial retail at its cellar and ground floors. Qualifying New Yorkers earning 40, 60 and 130 percent of the area median income can apply for units ranging from a studio for $596/month to a two-bedroom for $2,715/month.

Find out if you qualify

Architecture, Lower East Side

essex crossing, cetraruddy, lower east side

Rendering of Essex Crossing’s second phase, courtesy of Moso Studio via Curbed NY

Construction continues to progress at Essex Crossing, the roughly 1.9 million-square-foot mixed-use development planned to stretch several blocks on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The site, also known as the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, sat abandoned since 1967 until the city sold the nine sites to developers in 2013. While construction of the first phase of the massive project, which includes sites one, two, five and six, is underway, Curbed has acquired renderings for the development’s second phase, sites three and four. The third and fourth sites will be designed by CetraRuddy and Handel Architects, respectively, and feature residential, retail, office and outdoor space.

More this way

Construction Update, lincoln square, New Developments, Upper West Side 

200 amsterdam, upper west side, lincoln square

Rendering of 200 Amsterdam Avenue via SJP Properties

The Department of Buildings gave developers on Tuesday the go-ahead to construct a 668-foot residential tower on the Upper West Side. In a partnership between SJP Properties and Mitsui Fudosan America, the project at 200 Amsterdam Avenue will be the neighborhood’s tallest tower, surpassing the current title-holder, Trump International, by more than 80 feet. As Crain’s reported, construction was stalled after opponents argued the project did not follow required open space regulations and the buildings department shut down the site in July until the issue was resolved.

Find out more

Architecture, Financial District

45 Broad Street, supertall, FiDi

Rendering of 45 Broad Street found on-site, via CityRealty

The Financial District’s second supertall located just one block south of the New York Stock Exchange is getting ready for construction. The tower, found at 45 Broad Street, will reach 1,115 feet, feature 66 floors and include about 200 condominiums. As CityRealty discovered, new on-site renderings show a slender structure with an Art Deco style and pointed Gothic architecture. Designed by CetraRuddy, the tower will be the second tallest tower in Downtown Manhattan after 1 WTC, and the architecture firm’s tallest tower yet.

See the supertall

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