Brownsville

affordable housing, East New York, housing lotteries

1740-1760 Prospect Place, 396 Saratoga Avenue, Dattner Architects, Prospect Plaza, Brownsville development, NYC affordable housing

428 Saratoga Avenue, courtesy of Dattner Architects

Back in April of 2016, 6sqft shared the first affordable housing lottery to come online at the Dattner Architects-designed Prospect Plaza. Located in the Brownsville section of East New York–which has seen a slew of new below-market rate housing after a controversial rezoning–the 4.5-acre development will include a total of 364 units of of affordable and public housing, a 22,000-square-foot supermarket, 12,000-square-foot community facility, and a rooftop greenhouse. As of today, New Yorkers earning 40, 50, and 60 percent of the area median income can apply for 107 of these apartments at 428 Saratoga Avenue, ranging from $558/month one-bedrooms to $1,224/month three-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

affordable housing, Brooklyn, housing lotteries

1740-1760 Prospect Place, 396 Saratoga Avenue, Dattner Architects, Prospect Plaza, Brownsville development, NYC affordable housing

Through tools like rezonings, the city has been trying in recent years to increase affordable housing opportunities in lower-income Brooklyn neighborhoods like East New York and Brownsville, and the latter now has 86 brand new apartments available through the city’s affordable housing lottery. The units are part of the much larger Prospect Plaza development by Dattner Architects, which altogether will transform a 4.5-acre site into 364 units of affordable and public housing, as well as a 22,000-square-foot supermarket, 12,000-square-foot community facility, and a rooftop greenhouse.

The first batch of units to come online, located at 1740-1760 Prospect Place and 396 Saratoga Avenue, range from $689/month one-bedrooms to $1,181/month three-bedrooms for families earning between $24,995 and $63,060 annually. They’ll feature “exquisitely finished kitchen and bathrooms,” energy efficient appliances and fixtures, on-site laundry rooms, a fitness room, and parking for an additional fee.

Find out if you qualify

Featured Story

Brooklyn, City Living, Features, Neighborhoods

brownsville kids, reed young

Image © Reed Young

Most of the reported stories out of NYC’s “inner city” (code for ‘hoods) are tragic ones. We hear about stabbings and shootings and neglected children struggling to survive. We hear of turf wars and rampant addiction and people generally unable to take care of themselves. And it is from these dispatches that certain neighborhoods become notorious, their reputations inflated by our fearful imaginations and general unfamiliarity along with a harsh reality that cannot be denied. To the uninformed, these are dangerous places, war zones, to be avoided at all costs, at least, until the sheriff of gentrification rides into town to dispense safety through the pacifying panacea of increased rents and artisanal pickles.

I like fancy pickles, though the idea of people being forced from their homes is troubling. But this is not a rant against gentrification; it’s a shout out to the “inner city” neighborhoods that may someday get gentrified. More specifically, it’s about the good folks that populate those neighborhoods who manage to hold down the ‘hood and live their lives with dignity in the face of tremendous obstacles.

Andrew shares his experience as a teacher in the hood

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