Barclays Center

Policy, Polls

POLL: Do you think sports stadiums benefit communities?

By Dana Schulz, Wed, September 14, 2016

Barclays Center Green Roof, Barclays Center, Green Roof, green roofs brooklyn, green roofs new york, SHoP Architects, Forest City Ratner

Yesterday, 6sqft took a look at a Brookings institute study that showed three New York City sports stadiums–Yankee Stadium (the most expensive of all in the country), Citi Field, and the Barclays Center–have received $867 million in direct and indirect federal subsidies. This resulted in the loss of $3.7 billion in government revenues since 2000, due to “lost tax revenue from issuing exempt bonds and the indirect proceeds high-income bond holders receive.”

Because of this drain, the authors of the study advocate that stadiums should not be eligible to receive tax-exempt bonds, especially since they claim “there is little evidence that stadiums provide even local economic benefits.” But not everyone agrees, likening stadiums to other public enterprises like parks. And, at least as pertains to the stadiums in New York, these venues host other community events aside from ticketed sports games. Which side are you on?

Share your thoughts here

Policy, real estate trends

Barclays Center

A recent Brookings institute study shows that federal government subsidies of big-ticket sports stadium construction are essentially money down the drain, The Real Deal reports. Three New York City stadiums–Yankee Stadium, Citi Field (both completed in 2009) and the Barclays Center–have accounted for a significant portion of these subsidies in the form of tax-exempt bonds, which have resulted in the loss of $3.7 billion in federal government revenues since 2000.

Not exactly a surprise…

Featured Story

Architecture, Brooklyn, Carter Uncut, Downtown Brooklyn, Features, real estate trends, Urban Design

Skyline Wars: Brooklyn Enters the Supertall Race

By Carter B. Horsley, Wed, April 20, 2016

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. Here, Carter brings us his fifth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at Brooklyn’s once demure skyline, soon to be Manhattan’s rival.

Downtown Brooklyn has had a modest but pleasant skyline highlighted by the 350-foot-high Court & Remsen Building and the 343-foot-high great ornate terraces of 75 Livingston Street, both erected in 1926, and the 462-foot-high flat top of the 1927 Montague Court Building. The borough’s tallest building, however, was the great 514-foot-high dome of the 1929 Williamsburg Savings Bank Tower, now known as One Hanson Place, a bit removed to the east from Downtown Brooklyn. It remained as the borough’s tallest for a very long time, from 1929 until 2009. A flurry of new towers in recent years has significantly enlarged Brooklyn’s skyline. Since 2008, nine new towers higher than 359 feet have sprouted there, in large part as a result of a rezoning by the city in 2007. A few other towers have also given its riverfront an impressive frontage.

Whereas in the past the vast majority of towers were clustered about Borough Hall downtown, now there are several clusters with some around the Brooklyn Academy of Music and the former Williamsburg Savings Bank Tower and some around the Williamsburg riverfront.

more on Brooklyn’s skyline here

Daily Link Fix

subway riders, NYC subway

condos, Landscape Architecture, New Developments, Prospect Heights, Urban Design

Pacific Park Brooklyn, Atlantic Yards, Pacific Park master plan, Greenland Forest City Partners, Thomas Balsley Associates

Formerly known as Atlantic Yards, Pacific Park Brooklyn will be a 22-acre site anchored by the Barclays Center in Prospect Heights and containing eight million square feet of mixed-use development that includes 16 condo towers and 2,250 units of affordable housing, as well as an eight-acre park. Almost a year ago, developers Forest City Ratner Companies and Greenland USA (now merged as Greenland Forest City Partners) announced that they’d chosen Thomas Balsley Associates to design the green space. And now, we’re finally seeing the first set of renderings for the public space, in addition to a master plan.

The Daily News first shared the renderings, showing “the long, meandering park, which will follow the footprint of the new towers.” The outdoor space will boast a public plaza and promenade, toddler and children’s play areas, a bocce ball court, basketball court, dog run, glowing lanterns, sloping lawns, and a water garden.

More details ahead

Architecture, Landscape Architecture

barclays green roof

The 135,000-square-foot green roof planned for the SHoP Architects-designed Barclays Center is shaping up in readiness for its job of reducing noise from the arena, catching rainwater and looking good from below, though it won’t be publicly accessible. But here’s your chance to get on top and see all the work that’s being done in order to bring this project to life.

Watch the roof getting green, this way

Featured Story

Architecture, Features

favorite nyc buildings

Once upon a time, when 6sqft was not yet launched, a group of writers were asked for their thoughts on their favorite building in New York City. Their choices, some easily recognizable and others a little further from the beaten path, were mixed together with those of a few folks a lot like our readers—interested in and passionate about all things New York. The result? A wonderful blend of what makes this city great: its diversity, not simply demographically but also in the opinions of those eight million souls who weave together the fabric of all five boroughs to create the most interesting city in the world. And it stands to reason the most interesting city in the world is home to quite a few interesting buildings. As one might expect, there was barely a duplicate in the bunch. Some weren’t even on our radar!

Is your favorite on the list? If not, we’d love to know what you think in the comments.

Read on to see if you agree with our selections

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, New Developments, Prospect Heights, Rentals

Pacific Park Brooklyn, Greenland Forest City Partners, COOKFOX, Thomas Balsley

Forest City Ratner Companies and Greenland USA, a subsidiary of Shanghai-based Greenland Group, announced today that their new joint venture, Greenland Forest City Partners, has selected COOKFOX Architects to design two residential buildings at their Pacific Park Brooklyn project. They’ve also chosen Thomas Balsley Associates to design the site’s eight-acre public park, which will be called Pacific Park.

Formerly known as Atlantic Yards, Pacific Park Brooklyn will be a 22-acre site anchored by the Barclays Center and containing 8 million square feet of mixed-use development. The public park will be revealed in phases, with permanent and temporary installations. COOKFOX has begun the design for its two residential buildings– 550 Vanderbilt Avenue, set to feature 275 condominiums, and 535 Carlton Avenue, which will have approximately 300 affordable rentals. Construction is expected to begin on the latter this December, with 550 Vanderbilt not far behind. A third residential building will be designed by SHoP Architects, who were the minds behind the Barclays Center, at 30 Sixth Avenue with another 300 affordable rentals.

Much more on the project here

Fort Greene, Interiors, Recent Sales

20 South Oxford Street, Italianette townhouse, bidding war

The one-to-two family dwelling at 20 South Oxford Street must have made quite an impression on a few buyers. An apparent bidding war drove the price up from its initial $2.65 million asking to a final sale price of $3.3 million, according to city records. Located on a quiet, tree-lined street in the Fort Greene Historic District, this three-story Italianate-style home has a garden-level apartment with a separate entrance that can serve as an income suite or a fourth level. In addition, the home boasts high ceilings; a large backyard accented by a 123-square-foot deck; and many original details from its 1854 inception, including original marble mantles on each of the home’s six decorative fireplaces.

Take a look inside, here

Featured Story

Brooklyn, City Living, Features, opinion

Is Brooklyn the Shark That Can’t Be Jumped?

By Andrew Cotto, Wed, June 11, 2014

barclays jay z and michael jordan

My wife and I took the kids to the Barclays Center in early 2013, during the Nets’ inaugural season in Brooklyn. There had been a lot of hype, not only about the Nets but also about the new arena. And there had been a lot of flack about both the Nets and the arena, respectively, as well. But after all the back and forth, over many years, both the stadium and the Nets were part of Brooklyn, and while we had been ambivalent observers during the whole imbroglio, we were anxious to check things out once matters were settled.

The arena impressed. Spacious corridors and lots of polished surfaces. Professional and courteous service. We roamed around each level, sampling food and drinks from some of Brooklyn’s finest eateries and breweries. And, of course, a stop at the gift shop was mandatory for the kids to purchase Nets gear which had become the unofficial uniform of Brooklyn’s youth. By the time we sat down in our seats, we were definitely on board with the whole Nets/Barclays thing. The pregame production turned out to be top notch, too: dancers, acrobats, a DJ named TJ, a knight-of-some-sort who shot t-shirts into the crowd, and a super-stylish MC definitely on point, ratcheting the crowd into a pseudo-frenzy (it was only a mid-season game against Atlanta after all). And when the lights dimmed, and the music loomed, it was on for real: through the loud speakers came a familiar voice, smooth and deep, informed by a trademark flow…

“Welcome to Brooklyn, y’all…”

Oh my good-ness! That’s Jay-Z!

“Birthplace of Michael Jordan.”

 
Read more of Andrew’s story here

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