5pointz

Art, Long Island City, New Developments, Policy

5Pointz, graffiti museum, Long Island City developments, aerosol art

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Starting with the news that the iconic graffiti-covered warehouse known as 5Pointz in Long Island City, Queens, visible from passing trains since its beginnings the 1990s as an artists’ studio and exhibition space, was being razed and replaced by rental apartments, the building has been the subject of heated controversy. As 6sqft previously reported, in 2013 the complex was whitewashed of its colorful exterior murals under cover of night, and renderings surfaced for the rental towers that would replace it; as if to add insult to injury, the building’s owner, Jerry Wolkoff of G&M Realty, revealed plans to use the name 5Pointz as a marketing angle for the new development. Several attempts were made at intervention–and prevention of a similar fate for artists’ spaces since then. Now, the New York Times reports, a federal lawsuit filed by 23 5Pointz artists against Wolkoff, who ordered the art destroyed, is getting its day in court. On March 31, Judge Frederic Block of Federal District Court in Brooklyn ruled that the federal lawsuit against Wolkoff, who ordered the artwork destroyed–could have a jury trial, an incremental legal victory for the artists and a chance to confront Wolkoff in court to seek redress.

Find out more

Long Island City, New Developments, Rentals

5pointz, Mojo Stumer, 22-44 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City developments

It’s been three years since Long Island City‘s beloved graffiti mecca 5Pointz was whitewashed overnight and a year and a half since renderings first surfaced of the bland 41- and 47-story rental towers that would replace the site at 22-44 Jackson Avenue. Despite a perceived lack of respect towards the artistic community, G&M Realty’s David Wolkoff eventually said he planned to set aside 20 artists’ studios and displays to make up for those lost at 5Pointz, and it looks like he’s making good on his word. HTO Architect, who designed the towers, initially put forth views of a large public park and rotating mural exhibit that would fill the space between the buildings, and now 6sqft has uncovered renderings from Mojo Stumer of the artsy entryway, lobby and pool, which reveal the graffiti-inspired logo for the project.

See it all right here

Featured Story

Architecture, Carter Uncut, Features, Long Island City, Queens, Urban Design

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. Here, Carter brings us his sixth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the new towers defining the Queens skyline.

For a long time, the glass tower erected by Citibank was the lone skyscraper of note in Queens. Known initially as Citicorp at Court Square, it was built in 1989 and designed by Raul de Armas of SOM as a blue-green metal-panel-and-glass office tower with just a few setbacks at its 633-foot-high top—an extremely clean-cut, modern obelisk of fine proportions.

In a 1988 article in The New York Times, Anthony DePalma wrote that the tower “dominates the Queens skyline like a sequoia in the desert” and Paul Goldberger, then the newspaper’s architecture critic, wrote the tower was “rapidly becoming one of the most conspicuous structures in the entire city.” He added, “It is a very unlikely thing, this building—no other skyscraper in New York is remotely like the Citicorp tower, not so much for its design as for the fact that it stands free, alone in this landscape of gas stations, warehouses and row houses,”

The bank tower transformed “the landscape of New York” and “no longer does Manhattan virtually by itself control the skyline,” Mr. Goldberger continued. “Skyscrapers built at random all over New York would be devastating, but an occasional exclamation point, well designed and carefully placed, will do the skyline no grievous harm,” he concluded. This is a very important but also very controversial point as currently evidenced in Manhattan where traditional precincts are being pin-pricked to exhaustion and confusion by supertalls.

more on the queens skyline

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, Long Island City, New Developments, Queens, real estate trends

Watch out Hudson Yards, Midtown is moving east to Queens. The glassy ghetto formerly known as Long Island City is sprouting a small city worth of skyscrapers, ushering in thousands of new residents, hundreds of hotel rooms, and a few hundred thousand square feet of office space. To help us visualize the neighborhood’s upcoming transformation, the dynamos at Rockrose Development commissioned visualization experts Zum-3d to produce this exceptionally accurate depiction of the changes afoot. Inspired by the rendering, 6sqft has put together a rundown of the nearly 30 under-construction and proposed projects for the ‘hood.

See the full roster ahead

Art, Long Island City, Policy

5POINTZ, 5POINTZ mecca, 5POINTZ long island city

Photo via Garrett Ziegler/Flickr

It’s been 19 months since the 5Pointz graffiti mecca was secretly whitewashed overnight by the developers who have since razed the site to make way for the two residential towers that will replace it. Then, to pour salt in the wound, this past November G&M Realty announced that they planned to use the iconic 5Pointz name for their new project, infuriating the artists whose work adorned the building and leading them to launch a petition to stop the title.

Now, the plot has thickened. Nine graffiti artists filed a lawsuit on Friday “seeking unspecified damages from the owner who whitewashed away their artwork,” reports the Daily News. The plaintiffs claim they’re owed financial compensation as they were not given the opportunity to retrieve their work, much of which could have ended up in museums or the artists’ personal collections. The lost collection amounts to more than 350 graffiti pieces.

More details here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History

Original Penn Station, lost NYC landmarks, McKim Mead & White, Penn Station waiting room

At Monday’s MCNY symposium “Redefining Preservation for the 21st Century,” starchitect Robert A.M. Stern lamented about 2 Columbus Circle and its renovation that rendered it completely unrecognizable. What Stern saw as a modernist architectural wonder, notable for its esthetics, cultural importance (it was built to challenge MoMA and the prevailing architectural style at the time), and history (the building originally served as a museum for the art collection of Huntington Hartford), others saw as a hulking grey slab. Despite the efforts of Stern and others to have the building landmarked, it was ultimately altered completely.

This story is not unique; there are plenty of worthy historic buildings in New York City that have been heavily changed, let to fall into disrepair, or altogether demolished. And in many of these cases, the general public realized their significance only after they were destroyed. In honor of the 50th anniversary of the NYC landmarks law, we’ve rounded up some of the most cringe-worthy crimes committed against architecture.

Check out our list right here

Art, Long Island City, New Developments

5POINTZ, 5POINTZ mecca, 5POINTZ long island city

5Pointz before being demolished via Garrett Ziegler/Flickr

Back in November we first got wind of G&M Realty’s plan to trademark the 5Pointz name and use it for their new residential towers at the site; now artists connected to the Long Island City graffiti mecca are fighting back. Father-son developers Jerry and David Wolkoff had their trademark application denied twice, most recently on January 6th, for being too similar to a California real estate company. Before their third go, artist Jonathan Cohen (aka MeresOne), who ran 5Pointz for ten years, has started an online campaign advocating to protect the storied name. So far the petition has 2,050 signatures, with a goal of 3,000.

More details on the 5Pointz feud

Daily Link Fix

Lamppost, Central Park
  • There are 62 lampposts that are designated city landmarks. Who knew?? [GVSHP]
  • Local artists design markers for the South Bronx Culture Trail. [DNAinfo]
  • Ever wonder where the nickname Gotham came from? Turns out, it might have started as an insult. [Ephemeral NY]
  • NYC is America’s snobbiest city. We politely disagree. [Fortune]
  • On the one-year anniversary of the whitewashing of 5Pointz, a new documentary chronicles the artists’ efforts to save the graffiti mecca. [Brownstoner Queens]

Images: Central Park lamppost via 6sqft (L): Breakfast at Tiffany’s via Christina Saint Marche via photopin cc (R)

Weekly Highlights

Weekly Highlights: Top Picks from the 6sqft Staff

By Dana Schulz, Sat, November 8, 2014

katwise, kat o'sullivan, cartoon barn, cartoon home woodstock new york, crazy artist house woodstock
  • We bring you our second installment of ‘Living in the Sky’, a round up of all the residential skyscrapers, supertalls, and highrises set to change our skyline.
  • From the 1930s to ’50s Automats were a New York City dining staple for a hard-working lunch crowd, a modernist icon for a boundless machine-age future. We take a look back at the famed automats of Horn and Hardart.
  • Looks like Lauren Bacall’s Dakota apartment will go for a jaw-dropping $26 million.
  • We knew Woodstock was home to a lot of creative types, but we didn’t know it was this creative. You’ve got to see artist Katwise’s psychedelic, rainbow-colored home.
  • The developers of Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz want to trademark the 5Pointz name and use it for their new residential towers at the site. Needless to say, the artists are NOT happy.

Images: Woodstock house via Katwise (L); 5Pointz demolition via changsterdam via photopin (R)

Art, Long Island City, New Developments

5Pointz demolition, Long Island City, G&M Realty

A photo capturing the 5Pointz demolition via changsterdam via photopin

The whitewashing and subsequent demolition of Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz was painful enough for the arts community, but now G&M Realty, the developer responsible for the loss, wants to trademark the 5Pointz name and use it for their new residential towers at the site. And artists are not happy, saying the developer is trying to bank off their name.

G&M is planning two towers for the site, at 41 and 47 stories, that together will hold 1,000 rental units. The developer submitted an application to the United States Patent and Trademark Office in March to trademark “5Pointz,” but it was initially rejected in June for being too similar to another registrant. G&M now has six months to respond to the decision.

More on the story here

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