56 Leonard

Architecture, condos, New Developments, Tribeca, Video

56 Leonard is one of NYC’s most exciting recent architectural additions. Dreamt up by Herzog & de Meuron, the skyline-altering condo tower rises 57 stories with an undeniable acrobatic grace, carefully staggering its floors in a cantilevering Jenga-like configuration that also appears to be in perfect equilibrium. Although the project developed by the Alexico Group and Hines took nearly a decade to build, a new video (h/t The Real Deal) released by the developers fast tracks the long and arduous process, neatly wrapping up 10 years of work into just over 60 seconds.

see the full timelapse here

Featured Story

building of the year, Features, New Developments

VOTE for 6sqft’s 2016 Building of the Year!

By 6sqft, Sat, December 10, 2016

For new developments, 2015 was the year of reveals, but 2016 was all about watching these buildings reshape our city. Ahead we’ve narrowed a list of 12 news-making residential structures, each noted for their distinctive design, blockbuster prices, or their game-changing potential on the skyline or NYC neighborhoods.

Which of these you think deserves 6sqft’s title of 2016 Building of the Year? Have your say below. Polls for our third annual competition will be open up until 11:59 p.m., Sunday, December 11th*, and we will announce the winner on Tuesday, December 13th!

Learn more about each of the buildings in the running here

CityRealty, real estate trends

Even after countless big ticket closings at blockbuster buildings like 432 Park Avenue and The Greenwich Lane, the long-admired Robert A.M. Stern-designed, Zeckendorf-developed 15 Central Park West (15 CPW) remains king. According to CityRealty’s latest CR100 report—an index comprised of the top 100 condominium buildings in Manhattan—units in 15 CPW sold on average for $6,735 per square foot over 12 months, a number that is impressively higher than the index average of $2,824. Tribeca’s Herzog & de Meuron-designed “Jenga tower,” 56 Leonard also made its debut on the latest CR100, clocking an average price per square foot of $2,657.

find out more

Architecture, infographic, New Developments

nyc buildings compared to world buildings

Gray silhouettes from left to right: Shanghai World Financial Center, CTF Finance Centre, One WTC, Lotte World Tower, Mecca Royal Clock Tower, Shanghai Tower, Burj Khalifa. Click link here to enlarge >>

As the Skyscraper Museum so aptly writes, “Tall and BIG are not the same thing.”

Echoing 6sqft’s recent post on global supertalls, the infographic above illustrates how when the height of New York’s tallest towers are stacked up against the sky-high constructions abroad (and 1 WTC), our city’s skyscrapers truly are “runts on the world’s stage.” The image also reveals that not only do these towers lack significantly in height, but also in girth. This means what really makes the design of all of New York’s new skyscrapers so unique is not how tall they are, but rather, how slender they are.

more on all that here

CityRealty, condos, Manhattan, New Developments, real estate trends

new yorks most expensive buildings

While it seems like every block in the city is host to a construction site throwing up some luxury condo building or pricey rentals, not all of these developments are created equal. Following up on their last infographic which rounded up the city’s top five most expensive new developments, the data gurus over at CityRealty have culled an even more extensive list which pinpoints the 12 priciest structures going up right now. While the number of zeros that follow their combined $20,000,000,000 sellout will make your head hurt, what’s even more mind-boggling is that these 12 buildings alone will count for nearly HALF of the money that’ll be generated by the 200+ condo projects underway in Manhattan.

All the details here

condos, Construction Update, New Developments, Starchitecture, Tribeca

56 Leonard, Herzog de Meuron, Tribeca, skyscrapers, Alexico, Hines, Luxury Condos, NYC Developments

Last January, 6sqft reported on the the progress of Alexico Group /Hines’ project 56 Leonard: The concrete structure was around 700 feet tall with little more than 100 feet to rise. Now, alas, the 821-foot Tribeca tower, playfully known as “the Jenga building” and designed by Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron, has finally topped out! With a delivery date expected sometime next year, all that remains for its wacky floor plate configurations and erratic cantilevered projections is the remainder of its exterior cladding, which we hear will now also progress from the top down, and the interior fit-out of its 145 residences.

More details this way

Real Estate Wire

56 LEONARD CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS from Rob Cleary on Vimeo.

  • In anticipation for its topping out this summer, 56 Leonard, the 60-story tower designed by Herzog & de Meuron, released a time lapse video tracking the building’s rise from March 2014 to May 2015. [6sqft inbox; video link]
  • The “Late Show'”s presence has been a boon to landlords renting out retail. Rents in the midtown area right around the Ed Sullivan Theater have increased about tenfold since David Letterman showed up over 20 years ago. [NYT]
  • Comptroller Scott Stringer doesn’t think the dirty, rat-infested subway deserves the $1.3 billion it’s asking for to close its budget gap. [NYO]
  • Extell finally reveals its highly contested LES tower at 250 South Street. [Curbed]
  • The rare and beautiful “Brooklyn Embassy” townhouse has hit the market for $11.8 million. Although the building is currently split up into eight units, it could easily be turned back into a mansion. [NYDN]

Architecture, condos, Construction Update, New Developments, Starchitecture, Tribeca

56 Leonard, Herzog & de Meuron, Tribeca condos, Alexico Group, GHWA, WSP group, NYC skyscrapers, Manhattan skyline, Downtown, New York City construction

Esteemed architect and historian Robert A.M. Stern once said that “New York is a constellation of magic moments. No city as complex as New York rebuilds itself so often, and often so well.” Two stars are being born in that nebula of irregular streets we call Downtown. The taller of the two, 30 Park Place, is designed by the famed starchitect himself, and has recently surpassed its neighbor, the Woolworth Building, to soon take its place as the tallest residential perch in the district. The other star, 56 Leonard, may still shine brighter, however. While absent any height superlatives, 56 Leonard may very well end up being the most interesting skyscraper Downtown has produced in decades.

Nicknamed the “Jenga-building” and the “tower of penthouses,” 56 Leonard’s design comes from the Swiss architectural firm of Herzog & de Meuron while working with the residential know-it-alls at Goldstein Hill & West. Currently, the concrete frame is approximately 700 feet tall with little more than 100 feet to rise before topping off. The floors progressively stagger at varying configurations creating cantilevered interior spaces as well as outdoor balconies for each of the residences.

More details ahead

Architecture, Downtown Brooklyn, Major Developments, Manhattan, Starchitecture

New York supertalls, nyc towers, manhattan real estate, midtown condo, new york skyline

It seems like every week a new residential skyscraper is being announced in New York City, just earlier this week the New York Times noted that a partnership between Steven Witkoff and Harry Macklowe is moving ahead with a redevelopment of the Park Lane Hotel at 36 Central Park West with an 850-foot tower.

With the mind-boggling amount of residential spires poised to pierce the sky, here’s a quick rundown of the tallest of the tall–the spindly bunch set to soar higher than 700 feet. Keep in mind that just 30 years ago, the tallest residence in the city was perched atop the 664-foot Trump Tower. Today, buildings are on the drawing board for more than twice that height.

See our list of the 26 tallest towers

Featured Story

Features, real estate trends, Transportation

nyc parking

Car-owing New Yorkers can probably recite year-round alternative-side parking laws on cue, but most will also tell you how they loathe circling their block for 20 minutes, tracking which days to stay put, the inconvenience of babysitting a spot before the switch, figuring out a cluster of parking signs or, worse yet, arguing with a paid-for parking squatter. It often drives one batty.

Yet, there is an option and that’s paying for a monthly but costly sliver of asphalt—hopefully an elevator ride away or at the very least, a quick walk a few doors down. However, the key word here is “paying” and if you live in New York, that slice of space could put you back a pretty penny, especially if you’re shoveling out dollars for one in a new development.

Unless you’ve been living under a real estate rock, there’s no doubt you’ve read about the $1 million dollar spaces at 42 Crosby Street’s garage in SoHo. Is this lofty price tag for parking a market first? Nope.

more on the price of parking here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, real estate trends, Starchitecture

Glass vs. Stone: An Epic Architecture Battle

By Dana Schulz, Thu, September 18, 2014

glas and stone nyc buildings, stone nyc buildings, glas nyc buildings

Decisions, decisions…sometimes there’s just far too many in New York City. Thai or Chinese takeout? Subway or bus? Central Park or the High Line? The list goes on. And one of the most grueling decisions we make as New Yorkers is where to live. From choosing a borough and neighborhood to deciding on a price point, it’s quite the undertaking. But what about the most elementary component of the building in which we decide to live–it’s material. To be more exact, glass or stone.

Glass tower dwellers are often drawn to the floor-to-ceiling windows, panoramic views, and clean lines, whereas buyers of apartments in stone buildings prefer a more traditional feel, with pre-war-style layouts that provide great separation of spaces. And some of the city’s most prominent architects have become synonymous with one style or the other. Think Richard Meier for glass and Robert A.M. Stern for stone. CityRealty decided to take a closer look at this epic battle and see how pairs of glass and stone developments fared across the city.

See how these buildings battle it out

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