Brooklyn

Cool Listings, Red Hook

Listing photos courtesy of Brown Harris Stevens

The owner of this Red Hook rowhouse, a local architect and designer, bought the property at 373 Van Brunt Street in 2007 for just $700,000. He then created a “soaring industrial chic” home, as the listing describes, using repurposed salvaged beams, exposed brick, and structural steel. It’s set up as a live-work owner’s triplex, complete with a roof deck and a green roof, along with a ground-level commercial space that’s currently an art gallery. It’s now on the market for $2,875,000.

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Bed Stuy, Cool Listings

Listing photos by DDreps

In Stuyvesant Heights, this beautiful brownstone was fully gut renovated and restored to perfection by Shakespeare Gordon Vlado Architects. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t plenty of historic details. From stained glass transom windows to tons of tracery to delicately carved moldings, the home is dripping in elegant 19th-century architecture. For the 21st century, there’s a large skylit extension on two floors and more than 5,000 square feet of living space, including a garden-level rental unit. All of this and more is asking $3,950,000.

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Cool Listings, Red Hook

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

This Red Hook loft at 160 Imlay Street has incredible views of the lower Manhattan skyline, New York Harbor, and Statue of Liberty, but what truly sets it apart is how it overlooks the Red Hook Container Terminal, an active reminder of Brooklyn’s industrial past. The nearly 2,000-square-foot home is on the market for $1,995,000 and has two bedrooms, a separate study, and massive floor-to-ceiling windows.

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affordable housing, housing lotteries, Williamsburg

Streetview of 321 Wythe Avenue; Map data © 2021 Google

The 19-story rental at 321 Wythe Avenue opened in 2019, just two blocks from the South Williamsburg waterfront. After initially opening a lottery for 39 middle-income units, the building is relaunching its waitlist for these apartments. Currently, there are two vacant units, but all applicants will be placed on the list for future vacancies. Those earning 130 percent of the area median income can apply for the units that range from a $1,999/month one-bedroom to $2,459/month two-bedrooms.

Find out if you qualify

Cool Listings, Midwood

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

We sincerely hope that whoever buys this Victorian home in Midwood decides to keep at least some of the floral wallpaper, and there’s really no choice when it comes to preserving vintage elements like clawfoot tubs, a vintage Kenmore stove, and stained glass windows. The home was built in 1899, and today it’s an intriguing mix of 19th-century architecture and 1950s retro. It has six bedrooms, a covered porch, driveway, two-car garage, and both front and rear yards, and it’s on the market for $1.8 million.

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Brooklyn Heights, Cool Listings

Listing photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

Designed by prolific architect Emery Roth, Brooklyn Height’s St. George Tower was constructed in 1929 as part of the full-block St. George Hotel complex. The 30-story Art Deco tower at 111 Hicks Street was converted to 275 co-ops in 1984, leaving its east-facing apartments with views just as prolific. This three-bedroom duplex on the 22nd and 23rd floors has a 57-foot-long terrace that overlooks the entire Manhattan skyline, the Statue of Liberty, and the Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Verrazano bridges–views that are completely protected and enjoyed by every single room in the home.

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Featured Story

Features, History, Williamsburg

Photo of Willis Carrier (left) courtesy of Wikipedia; Photo of air conditioners in NY building courtesy of Marcel Oosterwijk on Flickr

It figures, but history shows us yet another way Brooklyn was cool, like, forever–though this particular example is a bit more literal. A classic New York City heatwave was just enough to turn up the Brooklyn ingenuity in a junior engineer named Willis Carrier, who devised a system of fans, ducts, heaters, and perforated pipes that became the world’s first air conditioner. The problem: blistering temperatures that were literally melting the equipment in a Williamsburg printing house. The solution was one that had eluded centuries of inventors through sweltering summers. The system was installed in the summer of 1902, according to the New York Times, and Carrier went on to found Carrier Corporation. He had hit on the idea while walking in the fog.

It’s the humidity

Bed Stuy, Cool Listings

Listing photos by DDReps

Asking $1,995,000, this Bed-Stuy townhouse at 781 Putnam Avenue is set up as an owner’s duplex and an income-generating garden-level apartment. Though the home was built in 1901, it’s been completely restored and renovated, resulting in a beautiful backdrop for the current owner’s art and contemporary furniture collection. The rear deck and backyard have also been done with a creative sentiment, offering a laid-back oasis.

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Cool Listings, Park Slope

Listing photos by Hayley Ellen Day / DDReps

There’s technically nothing spectacular about this Park Slope co-op, but it’s got a cheerful disposition that makes us happy. The $775,000 price tag is also quite eyecatching for a two-bedroom plus roof deck, but it should be noted that the bedrooms are both on the small side, there’s minimal closet space, and the rooftop is still mostly raw. However, on the plus side, the home is located at 813 8th Avenue, just one block from Prospect Park.

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Brooklyn, Events, Greenwood, History

Battle of Brooklyn reenactment in Green-Wood Cemetery; Photo by Allison Meier on Flickr

The first major battle to take place during the Revolutionary War after the United States declared independence took place in Brooklyn on August 27, 1776. During the Battle of Brooklyn, fighting took place across the borough, including throughout present-day Prospect Park, Fulton Ferry Landing, and Green-Wood Cemetery. To commemorate the 245th anniversary of the historic struggle, Green-Wood Cemetery is hosting a family-friendly event this month with Revolutionary War reenactors, music, demonstrations, and other activities.

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