Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture, More Top Stories, New Developments, Williamsburg

With building construction well under way at the Domino Sugar Factory site, Two Trees Management has now released details about the 11-acre park that will anchor the three-million-square-foot Williamsburg mega-development. To be known as Domino Park and designed by James Corner Field Operations, the quarter-mile open space will boast a new waterfront esplanade, six acres of parkland, a plethora of preserved artifacts, and easier waterfront access. In addition to sharing several new renderings, Two Trees also announced that the park will open in the summer of 2018.

All the details and renderings ahead

Landscape Architecture

Belvedere Castle, Central Park, Central Park landmarks, NYC castles

While the outside of the Belvedere Castle looks strong, the inside of the 146-year-old fortress is actually crumbling. The cracked pavement, leaking roof, and plumbing issues encouraged the Central Park Conservancy to start a 10-year $300 million campaign last summer to renovate its structures, as well as surrounding playgrounds. As DNAInfo reported, beginning at the end of this summer and early fall, the castle, the Bernard Family Playground, and the Billy Johnson Playground will be closed for reconstruction.

Find out more

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

If you thought the roller coaster that is Pier 55 was over since construction began in November, you may not want to step off the ride just yet. Just yesterday, a federal judge ruled in favor of the City Club of New York, who took legal action against the $200 million Barry Diller-funded offshore park way back in the summer of 2015. As reported by the Times, Judge Lorna G. Schofield agreed with the group’s claim that the Army Corps of Engineers had not conducted a sufficient environmental review on how the 2.4-acre park would affect fish and wildlife. She ordered that work stop at the site and called for a review of alternatives for building along Hudson River Park, a maritime sanctuary.

Get the whole legal saga

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Midtown East

601 Lexington Avenue Market Building, Citicorp Center, Gensler, Boston Properties

Earlier this month, 6sqft revealed renderings of 601 Lexington Avenue‘s (the Midtown East skyscraper formerly known as the Citicorp Center) new “Market Building,” comprised of an interior atrium to hold dining/retail space and a new outdoor plaza and terraces. Though the LPC landmarked the building this past December, the Architect’s Newspaper has learned of a loophole in the designation regarding the privately owned public space, which could mean that amid the renovation, the sunken plaza and cascading fountain designed by Hideo Sasaki‘s firm–one of the iconic landscape architect’s few remaining works–may be demolished.

The full story ahead

City Living, Landscape Architecture

In 2007, officials launched MillionTreesNYC, an initiative with the aim of greening New York City through the planting and care of one million trees. While the city surpassed its goal in 2015, planting 1,017,634 trees by the year’s end, efforts to increase leafy canopy coverage across the five boroughs has not wavered since. With that said, if you’re a New Yorker who feels that your street could use a bit more greenery (ahemSean Lennon), getting a tree planted on your block is much easier than you may think. By simply filling out a request with the New York Parks Department, you can get a tree planted, for free, so long as the plot you have in mind is suitable for planting.

find out more details here

Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

statue of liberty

A gift to perhaps the greatest woman in New York City, it was revealed on Wednesday that the Statue of Liberty will be receiving a $4.58 million facelift. The Post had the details on the plans which were approved by The National Park Service (NPS) earlier this week. The overhaul is expected to include the planting of 46 salt-tolerant trees, repairs to the statue’s granite pavers, and the installation of about 1,650-feet of stainless steel fencing and new gates around Lady Liberty’s base.

more details here

Landscape Architecture, Staten Island, Urban Design

Although High Line Park visionary Robert Hammond recently expressed remorse for failing to develop a park that was “for the neighborhood”—not the ultra-wealthy that have infiltrated the blocks directly surrounding the elevated marvel—other cities continue to see nothing but financial opportunity in thrusting parkland upward. 6sqft recently reported on Newark, NJ, which will soon break ground on their own version of the High Line in hopes of revitalizing their long-burdened downtown, and now the Staten Island Economic Development Corp. (SIEDC) has announced that Port Richmond is angling for their own High Line magic atop .53 miles of abandoned North Shore rail line.

more details and photos here

Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

LIBERTY MUSEUM NEW YORK: Freedom to the people, Social Justice Media, Statue of Liberty Museum, Jungwoo Ji, Bosuk Hur, Suk Lee, NYC design competition

Though plans were approved in November for the $70 million FXFOWLE-designed Statue of Liberty Museum, Archasm recently launched a speculative design competition for the site. Titled “LIBERTY MUSEUM NEW YORK: Freedom to the people,” the timely contest sought proposals that focused on civil and social justice, and ArchDaily now brings us the winning design from EUS+ Architects‘ Jungwoo Ji, Folio‘s Bosuk Hur, and Iowa State University student Suk Lee. The Korean designers were inspired by candlelight marches against social injustice in their home country and created an architectural landscape of water droplet-shaped modules that respond to global issues in real time. When a tweet about “dire events” is sent to the museum, the modules receive an electronic signal and moves to point toward the geographic location mentioned.

More looks and details on the design ahead

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Urban Design

Despite the fact that the 535 concrete piles that will support the planned undulating base of the Pier 55 offshore park have already been erected, the Hudson River Park Trust is now looking towards a flatter design. The Architect’s Newspaper obtained a copy of a permit modification request that the group submitted to the Army Corps of Engineers that reduces the park’s overall size slightly from 2.7 to 2.4 acres and replaces many of the hollow pentagonal pots that would have sat on top of the columns with “a flat structural base sandwiches between the piles and the landscaping.”

Find out the reason for the major change

adaptive reuse, Architecture, Chelsea, Landscape Architecture, Major Developments, Meatpacking District

pier 57, google, google expansion, anthony bourdain, !MELK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN, GOOGLE, HANDEL ARCHITECTS, HUDSON RIVER PARK, HUDSON RIVER PARK TRUST, PIER 57, RXR REALTY, YOUNG WOO & ASSOCIATES

Pier 57 now showing some skin; Photo: CityRealty

Work is moving along at the waterfront development that is rehabilitating and revitalizing Pier 57, Manhattan’s new “SuperPier;” newly-installed, canted glass panels can be seen along the pier’s rows of exterior columns, CityRealty reports. The $350 million transformation of the former freight terminal, a joint venture by Young Woo & Associates and RXR will include 250,000 square feet of offices for Google, a 170,000-square-foot food market curated by Anthony Bourdain and provide an elevated two-acre park with a rooftop movie and performance amphitheater. The project’s design is being handled by Handel Architects and !Melk Landscape Architecture and Urban Design.

Check out new construction photos

Landscape Architecture, Tribeca, Urban Design

It was announced just over a year ago that starchitect Rafael Viñoly would donate his services to the Hudson River Park Trust to design an estuarium, a science education and research center, at the base of Tribeca‘s Pier 26. Now, Tribeca Citizen has brought us the first set of conceptual renderings of the $30 million Pier, which don’t include Viñoly’s building (other than as a placeholder), but show how landscape architects OLIN will transform the 800-foot pier between North Moore and Hubert Streets into a ecological park, complete with huge lounge net areas, sports fields, expansive lawns, a river esplanade, sandy dunes, wetlands to attract birds and wildlife, and elevated tree-lined pathways that are “inspired by being in the woods,” according to DNAinfo.

See all the renderings

City Living, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

Next year, urban planners across the country will have a handy new tool at their disposal to help better inform them on the placement of parks and other recreation in their respective cities. Together with ESRI, the Trust for Public Land (TPL) have been developing a new website called ParkServe that has culled park data from nearly 14,000 parks across the country. As Statescoop shares, in addition assisting in park planning through open-space advocacy and research, the new site will help citizens take advantage of, and have a say in the development of, local parks.

more on the new site

adaptive reuse, Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design, Williamsburg

Maker Park, Bushwick Inlet Park, Williamsburg Waterfront, Bayside Oil Depot

Plans for Bushwick Inlet Park, a 28-acre open space along an unused industrial stretch of the Williamsburg waterfront, first came about in 2005, when the Bloomberg administration rezoned the area to allow for new residential development in exchange for the open space. Fast forward to last week, and the city finally acquired the last piece of land for the project, the controversial Citistorage site. Now that the park is on its way to becoming a reality, a trio of grassroots creatives hopes to bring their alternative vision for the former Bayside Oil Depot site to the forefront. Maker Park is the proposal to adaptively reuse this seven-acre parcel’s architectural infrastructure–namely the ten 50-foot decommissioned fuel containers–and create a “park as creative as the neighborhood around it.” The Architect’s Newspaper recently revealed the first set of renderings, which showcase performance venues, art galleries, hanging gardens, reflecting pools, and an adventure playground.

More views and design details

Construction Update, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Urban Design

Current view of Pier55 site, via 6sqft

Now that the Barry Diller-funded Pier 55 offshore park can proceed freely, the Wall Street Journal took a look at how construction is progressing on the $200 million project. Currently, the 535 concrete columns, each three feet wide and ranging from 70 to 200 feet long, that will support the 2.75-acre park have been erected, poking out of the Hudson River amidst the historic wooden piles that once supported Pier 54, where the Titanic was supposed to dock (these will remain to sustain marine life development). On top of them will be pots, “hollow pentagonal forms” that weigh as much as 60 tons and will be “linked with concrete to create a rectangular platform of about 104,000 square feet.”

More new details this way

Architecture, condos, Landscape Architecture, Major Developments, New Developments, Rentals, Starchitecture, Upper West Side 

Towers L to R: Rafael Viñoly, Richard Meier, Kohn Pedersen Fox

Forty-two years after Donald Trump first proposed a mixed-use development on the Upper West Side waterfront, one of the final pieces of the puzzle is coming together. Curbed got their hands on sparkling new renderings of what’s now being called Waterline Square, a trio of residential towers on the five-acre site between West 59th and 61st Streets that’s part of Riverside Center. In addition to views of the glassy structures, which will offer a combination of condos and rentals, and a Mathews Nielsen-designed park, what makes the reveal so exciting is the roster of starchitects behind the towers–Richard Meier and Partners, Rafael Viñoly Architects, and Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates.

More details and renderings

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

Statue of Liberty Museum, FXFOWLE, Liberty Island, NYC museum design

It’s full steam ahead for the FXFOWLE-designed Statue of Liberty Museum. Per the Journal, The National Park service approved plans on Wednesday to erect the free-standing structure on Liberty Island. The development team broke ground on the project in early October and at the same time releasing renderings of what would eventually rise on the site. As 6sqft previously reported, the $70 million museum is being helped along by Diane von Furstenberg, who has been named the honorary “godmother” of the project. Von Furstenberg is currently spearheading fundraising efforts for the museum and hopes to secure $100 million from donors for the development. Von Furstenberg, along with her husband Barry Diller, are also in the midst of pushing another civic project forward, Pier55 Park.

find out more here

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Transportation, Urban Design

With New York City’s population on its way to nine million, the city’s infrastructure may be impressive, but it has its limits–including red tape and resource shortages–that will make it difficult to withstand the projected surge. Reminding us of the transformative innovations of Robert Moses–he of the big ideas and ego to match–Crains invited 12 firms who make their living wrangling infrastructure to hit us with some big ideas. Ahead of the upcoming summit, “Getting Ready for 9 Million New Yorkers,” they’ve shared these visions for future (bigger, better) New York from top architects, designers and real estate experts. Ideas include some that have already proven themselves (repurposing existing track beds) and some already in the works (Bushwick’s Rheingold brewery project) to others that Robert Moses might not love (shrinking the city’s highways).

Take a look at these futuristic ideas for moving the city forward.

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy

Pier 55, Hudson River Park Trust, Barry Diller

After nearly a year and a half of yo-yo-ing back and forth between stop work orders and lawsuits, the Barry Diller-funded Pier 55 park can finally move ahead freely. The New York Law Journal reports that yesterday the state Court of Appeals denied the City Club of New York’s appeal of September’s ruling in favor of Pier 55 and the Hudson River Park Trust (HRPT) that said construction could continue on the 2.75-acre offshore park, dismissing the opponents’ claims that the park failed to go through adequate environmental impact evaluations and violated the public trust doctrine by planning to host private events.

What this means for Pier 55

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

Statue of Liberty Museum, FXFOWLE, Liberty Island, NYC museum design

Four months after it was announced that FXFOWLE would be designing a new, free-standing museum for the Statue of Liberty, principal architect Nicholas Garrison has revealed renderings of his vision for the site at today’s groundbreaking ceremony on Liberty Island. The $70 million project–which will be largely funded by fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg–features an angular-shaped, 26,000-square-foot building constructed of glass, granite and concrete that was inspired by its waterfront location. It’ll sit across the circular plaza from the Statue and will “seemingly rise out of the ground,” according to Crain’s, thanks to its green roof that acts as an extension of the surrounding park.

More renderings and details this way

Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side, Urban Design

lowline, James Ramsey, Dan Barasch, underground park, Entrance to the Lowline, lowline renderings, raad architecture

Lowline Lab via 6sqft

Just a couple months ago, the NYC Economic Development Corporation granted preliminary approvals to the Lowline, the world’s first underground park. This came after the city put out a Request for Expressions of Interest (RFEI) late last year for the 60,000-square-foot abandoned trolley terminal below Delancey Street. The Lowline proposal was the only one received, and initially the 154-page document was only to be publicly available through a Freedom of Information Law request, but the group worked with the EDC to release it to the community. The Lo-Down got a look at the document, which reveals everything from the projected cost of the project ($83 million) and operating hours (6am to 9pm, five days a week) to specific design elements like a “ramble” and 1,600-square-foot cafe/bar.

Lots more details this way

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, New Jersey, Urban Design

Jersey City, So+So Studio, public infrastructure, elevated park, Green Villain, The Bergen Arches, Erie Cut

Architecture firm So+So Studio has proposed a new vision for New Jersey’s Bergen Arches, an abandoned four-track cut of the Erie Railroad that runs one mile through the Palisides. The site has remained unused, overgrown, and forgotten since the last train ran in 1959. So+So, however, sees a much more lively vision for the tracks, and they’ve teamed up with Green Villain, a Jersey City place-making organization, and local residents to turn the unused space into a locale for artistic and leisure activity.

Dubbed “The Cut,” the project is both architectural and landscape-based, calling for an elevated system of ramps and walkways that will take participants under canopies, through sculpture gardens, and into graffiti-tunnels more than 60 feet below ground. With the public park, So+So hopes to promote contemporary local artists as well as expose decades of preserved graffiti and art that line the forgotten landscape.

see more here

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Midtown West, photography

On Wednesday, Bjarke Ingels‘ famous rental tetrahedron Via 57 West wrapped up construction, and now that the cranes are down and the shimmering facade panels are all set in place, we can see the building in its true glory. Architectural photographer Iwan Baan wasted no time, releasing a captivating set of images that showcase the half-block-long development from just about every angle, including some incredible aerial shots. First shared by designboom, the photographs provide never-before-seen vantages of the building’s central courtyard, as well as views of how the 32-story building fits in with the skyline.

Ogle all the photos

Architecture, Landscape Architecture

Pier 55, Hudson River Park Trust, Barry Diller

All systems are go for the Barry Diller-funded Pier55 park, as a State Appellate court ruled today that work can continue on the 2.75-acre project sited along the Hudson River. As 6sqft previously reported, the main opponent of the park—better known as The City Club of New York—has been aiming to thwart the project under the claim that those involved, namely the Hudson River Park Trust (HRPT) and Pier55 Inc. (the nonprofit manager established by Diller), failed to go through adequate environmental impact evaluations. City Club served the pair with a lawsuit that eventually led to a stop work order in June. However, an appeals court lifted the stop work order shortly after, and by the end of August, the first nine piles were installed.

Today’s ruling upholds a lower court’s decision that HRPT and Pier55 Inc. did in fact do a proper environmental review, and moreover, that HRPT was not required to put out an RFP to solicit other ideas for the site from other developers—another major point of contention. The court also decided that the park reserves the right to use the space for non-public events like ticketed concerts, although it is noted that “the lease requires that 51 percent of the performances be free or low-cost.”

find out more here

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

Pier 55, Hudson River Park Trust, Barry Diller

Once again in the news is media mogul Barry Diller’s futuristic offshore cultural pier development at Pier 55 on the Hudson River. The proposed park project, known informally as Diller Park after its main backer, who is chairman of IAC/InterActiveCorp and is married to fashion designer Diane Von Furstenburg, is helmed by the Hudson River Park Trust.

The New York Times reports that the project’s main opponent, a civic group called The City Club of New York, may have an equally powerful backer. According to Diller, there is a deep-pocketed “hidden hand” funding the legal actions against the park. In a recent interview, Diller said, “The backer of all this is one Douglas Durst.”

Find out more

Construction Update, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District

Work on the Barry Diller-funded Pier55 park is advancing nicely, even after being slapped with a lawsuit and a stop work order in June. As the Hudson River Park Trust (HRPT) and Pier55 Inc. announced this afternoon, the first nine piles propping up the 2.7-acre undulating park have been installed. Per the pair’s press release, the milestone marks the completion of summer work and is part of the initial work of the first phase of construction.

more on the progress here

Events, Landscape Architecture, Starchitecture, Urban Design

ohny 2016

Here’s a sneak peek at the more than 250 sites that have made it onto 2016’s highly anticipated Open House New York Weekend (OHNY), a two-day festival where usually off limits buildings across the city’s five boroughs open their doors to the public for tours, talks, and exploration. Now in its 14th year, OHNY has brought back a number of beloved locales to their roster, including the NY State Pavilion, the Brooklyn Army Terminal, City Hall and Google; they’ve also rounded up a number of brand-new spaces like the Metropolitan Opera House and the West Village’s Westbeth Artists House. The full list won’t be released for another few weeks, but we’ve got some of the highlights ahead.

More sites opening their doors this way

Architecture, condos, Gramercy Park, Landscape Architecture, New Developments

122 East 23rd Street, Toll Brothers, Rem Koolhaas, NYC starchitecture, Gramercy development

As 6sqft previously reported, “thirty-eight years after the publication of his acclaimed book ‘Delirious New York,’ Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas and his global architecture firm the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)… have finally landed their first ground-up New York City commission.” And now, CityRealty.com has uncovered the first official renderings of the two-towered condo development, located at 122 East 23rd Street in Gramercy.

The Pritzker Prize winner has designed a crystalline glass and concrete facade with a chiseled corner on the north building that exposes its glass edges. In between the two buildings will be a courtyard surrounded by private apartment terraces. The courtyard will lead into a pool area, children’s play area, and screening and party rooms on the building’s lower levels. There will also be a robotic parking system that brings cars to underground storage.

More details

Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, Policy, Urban Design

Pier 55, Hudson River Park Trust, Barry Diller

At the end of last month, an appellate court issued an injunction that said work must temporarily stop at Barry Diller’s Pier 55 until at least September when opponents of the futuristic offshore park (who claimed it had gone through inadequate environmental impact evaluations) could present their case again. But The Real Deal reports today that work has resumed much sooner than expected, as an appeals court lifted the stop work order yesterday.

Find out more

Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side, Urban Design

lowline, James Ramsey, Dan Barasch, underground park, Entrance to the Lowline, lowline renderings, raad architecture

Lowline Lab via 6sqft

The world’s first underground park just got one step closer to reality thanks to approvals from the NYC Economic Development Corporation. The Lowline, which will occupy a 40,000-square-foot abandoned trolley terminal below Delancey Street on the Lower East Side, received the thumbs up after an eight-month bidding process during which no one else submitted a proposal.

City hall granted co-creators James Ramsey and Dan Barasch control of the space provided they can reach a $10 million fundraising goal over the next 12 months, complete a schematic design, and host five to 10 public design sessions and quarterly community engagement meetings.

What’s next and who’s paying for this?

Landscape Architecture

Belvedere Castle, Central Park, Central Park landmarks, NYC castles

If you’ve walked through Central Park on a recent weekend, you’ve likely noticed lush grass, blooming flowers, and hordes of tourists and locals alike enjoying the city’s unofficial backyard. But a closer look reveals “the debilitating effects of time and modern use,” according to the Times, which is why the Central Park Conservancy is embarking a 10-year, $300 million campaign to fund repairs and restorations in the 843-acre open space.

Forever Green: Ensuring the Future of Central Park” will address issues such as a leaking roof at the 144-year-old Belvedere Castle, plumbing issues and cracked pavement at the Conservatory Garden, and insufficient infrastructure at the Naumburg Bandshell. It will also restore arches, bridges, gazebos, and waterways to Olmsted and Vaux’s original Adirondack- and Catskills-inspired vision.

But where will the money come from?

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