Tallest buildings in the world

Architecture

supertall skyscrapers, 432 Park Avenue, tallest buildings in the world

As of December 23, when the slender 1,396-foot-tall 432 Park Avenue condominium tower was officially pronounced complete by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) as the building was “partially habitable,” it became the world’s 100th supertall skyscraper (h/t TRD), categorized as those at least 984 feet in height. In addition to being the world’s tallest all-residential building, 432 Park Avenue is also the world’s 14th-tallest building overall and the city’s seventh supertall skyscraper. In fact, New York has the second-highest number of supertalls on the planet.

Find out more about the world’s tallest towers

Architecture, infographic

It was a big day in New York City last Friday, when the One World Trade Center Observatory officially opened to the public, welcoming New Yorkers and tourists alike to the top of the tallest building in North America. While the view from 1,250 feet up in the air seems like the apex of the world, the folks over at the Skyscraper Museum put together this fun infographic, which compares the highest publicly-accessible tourist spaces around the world, including observation decks, bars, restaurants, and other sky-high thrills. Turns out, the One World Trade Observatory ranks 9th for observation decks and 11th for all publicly-accessible spaces.

More details ahead

Architecture, infographic

world's tallest buildings, skyscraper history

An infographic about the world’s tallest buildings is not a new idea (in fact, we’ve featured a great one, as well an interactive version, here before). But the Economist’s idea of looking at the race to the top connected with the times and world events is a fresh take. The highly detailed chart shows the tallest building constructed every year beginning in 1885. Each bar represents its height, and the color shows on what continent it was built. The chart also highlights exceptionally noteworthy buildings and certain world events that contributed to the ebb and flow of skyscraper construction over time.

More details ahead

History, infographic, real estate trends

worlds tallest buildings, tallest buildings in usa, tallest buildings in europe, tallest buildings in asia, tallest buildings in north america

From the pyramids of Teotihuacan to One World Trade, here are the tallest buildings of the last 5,000 years.

Slovakian artist and designer Martin Vargic created six infographics that chart the history of buildings across Europe, North America, Asia, Africa, South America and Oceania. The infographics, which date buildings (and a few notable monuments) as far back as 2,650 B.C., give a pretty complete look, highlighting the construction’s name, shape, height (which does account for a tower’s spire), the year it was erected, and the years it was its continent’s, if not the world’s (denoted by a red shading), tallest building. The charts also give a good snapshot of the great skyscraper race that took hold in the early 20th century, as well as shifts in global money as seen in the emergence of Asian skyscrapers like Taipei 101 and the Burj Khalifa in the mid-2000s. You can get a closer look by expanding the image ahead.

This way for the complete picture

New Developments, real estate trends

The U.S. Trails Behind in the Global Skyscraper Race

By Diane Pham, Mon, February 23, 2015

tallest buildings in manhattan

New York is most certainly experiencing a skyscraper boom, but you may be surprised to find out that the number of supertalls going up in the city account for only a small percentage of what’s going up globally. According to CBS News, just 20 percent of the world’s towers are being built stateside, and of all the tall buildings completed last year, we had only four in the top 20 (One World Trade Center topped the list). So if we aren’t number one in this race, then where is this new crop of towers creeping up?

Find out here

Daily Link Fix

JFK, Jet Blue Terminal
  • Jet Blue terminal at JFK wants to replicate a small-scale version of the High Line atop its new extension for international arrivals. More at the New York Times.
  • The John’s of 12th Street documentary provides a peek into the historic East Village restaurant that was once a favorite of Lucky Luciano and now is often a set for HBO’s Boardwalk Empire. Bedford + Bowery has more details.
  • The Financial Times has a fun infographic that shows how fast the elevators go in some of the world’s tallest buildings, and One World Trade Center, the Empire State Building, and the Chrysler Building are on the list. Turns out, taller doesn’t always equal faster.
  • A new exhibit at Williamsburg’s City Reliquary explores the world of the 1910s New York Jewish mobster. Brooklyn Magazine has all the info on “Mazel Tough.”

Images: Rendering of Jet Blue’s “mini High Line” via Jet Blue (L); Fastest elevators in the world via Financial Times (R)

Daily Link Fix

  • Never worry about working late again. At 6:00pm the desks retract up to the ceiling in this Amsterdam office. Get ready to be jealous when you watch the video on Co. Exist.
  • Architizer shares the super informative infographic, “The World’s Tallest Buildings.”
  • Subway-riding germaphobes can rest easy this flu season. Gravitytank and Betabrand have released the Germinator Transit Jacket to ward off unwanted coughs and sneezes. Check it out on designboom.
  • Hook-on high chairs, convertible beds and more: Brick Underground rounds up the must haves for living with a little one in NYC.
  • Whatever happened to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Island? The Bowery Boys have the answer.

Images: The World’s Tallest Buildings via Control Surveys (L); Germinator Transit Jacket via Betabrand (R)

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