SOM

Landmarks Preservation Commission, Major Developments, Museums, New Developments, South Street Seaport

The approved design. All renderings courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / Howard Hughes Corporation

The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday voted to approve plans for a debated mixed-use project and a new museum in the South Street Seaport. The Howard Hughes Corporation presented a revised proposal for 250 Water Street that includes one 324-foot tower to be built on a parking lot instead of the two 470-foot structures originally proposed in January. The project also involves constructing a new building for the South Street Seaport Museum at 89 South Street.

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Landmarks Preservation Commission, Major Developments, Museums, New Developments, South Street Seaport

All renderings courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / Howard Hughes Corporation

Plans to construct two 470-foot towers and expand a museum in the historic South Street Seaport neighborhood were met with mixed feedback during a public Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing on Tuesday. The Howard Hughes Corporation presented a proposal for a $1.4 billion mixed-use project consisting of rentals, condos, and office space at 250 Water Street, as well as a new building for the South Street Seaport Museum at 89 South Street. While those in favor of the project say it will bring much-needed affordable housing to a neighborhood that has almost none and help the museum stay open, opponents claim the project is out of scale with the rest of the district. New renderings of the proposed expanded museum show plans for a copper-clad exterior, flexible gallery space, an outdoor terrace, and a connection to the historic structure.

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Design, Midtown, New Developments, Transportation

See inside the new light-filled Moynihan Train Hall

By Devin Gannon, Wed, December 30, 2020

Photo © Max Touhey

As one of the few bright spots during a very dark time in New York, the new Moynihan Train Hall opens to the public on Friday. The new transit hub expands Penn Station into the landmarked James A. Farley Post Office Building on Eighth Avenue, increasing capacity at the busiest railroad station in the country by 50 percent. On Wednesday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo celebrated the opening of Moynihan Train Hall, which was inspired by the design of the original Penn Station that was demolished in the 1960s. Ahead, get a look inside the new train hall, including the 92-foot-high massive skylights that total one acre and the new waiting areas for the Long Island Rail Road and Amtrak.

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affordable housing, Major Developments, New Developments, South Street Seaport

All renderings courtesy of The Howard Hughes Corporation/SOM

The Howard Hughes Corporation on Thursday unveiled its latest effort to redevelop the South Street Seaport neighborhood. The $1.4 billion proposal includes the construction of two 470-foot towers which would contain rentals, condos, and office space on a parking lot at 250 Water Street. Initial plans from the developer called for a single tower that would rise nearly 1,000 feet, but local residents and Community Board 1 opposed it. Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the two towers would include 360 units, with at least 100 apartments set aside for families earning 40 percent of the area median income. It would be the first affordable housing built in the community under the city’s Mandatory Inclusionary Housing program.

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Design, hudson yards

Hudson Yards’ second-tallest tower reveals new looks

By Devin Gannon, Thu, September 13, 2018

35 Hudson Yards, Hudson Yards, SOM

Rendering via Binyan Studios

A fresh set of renderings was revealed Wednesday of 35 Hudson Yards, the tallest residential tower in the rapidly developing Manhattan neighborhood. David Childs of Skidmore Owings & Merrill (SOM) designed the 92-story supertall, which topped out at 1,009 feet in June. The limestone and glass tower will contain 143 condos, 22,000 square feet of private amenities, and an Equinox club, spa, and 200-room hotel. Following 1,296-foot-tall 30 Hudson Yards, which topped out in July, neighboring 35 Hudson Yards is the second-tallest tower at the site.

Take a peek

Hotels, Midtown East

Photo via Wikimedia

When the iconic Waldorf Astoria closed in 2017 for the massive renovation promised when Chinese company Anbang Insurance Group acquired it in 2014, the hotel’s future held jumbo condos and massive guest rooms. The fate of the Park Avenue landmark has been a topic of drama and discussion ever since, especially given the takeover of Anbang by the Chinese government after the incarceration of the company’s chairman, Wu Xiaohui, last year during a fraud investigation. The New York Post now reports that although contractor AECOM Tishman has signed a deal with Anbang and construction is underway for the promised 350 condos and 350 hotel rooms, the project’s completion date has been moved from 2020 to 2021.

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Midtown West, New Developments

manhattan west, hudson yards, som, renderings, brookfield properties, new developments, skyscrapers, tall towers, megaproject, midtown west

Five Manhattan West. Rendering via Millerhare.

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced today that tech giant Amazon will be growing its presence in New York City. The company just signed a lease for a 359,000-square-foot administrative office at Five Manhattan West, Brookfield Property Partners’ 16-story, 1.8 million-square-foot Skidmore, Owings & Merrill-designed building located on Tenth Avenue between 31st and 33rd Streets. The new addition is expected to create 2,000 new jobs in finance, sales, marketing, and information technology. The offices will be the main New York location for Amazon Advertising, which handles sales, marketing, product, design, engineering and more. “We’re excited to expand our presence in New York–we have always found great talent here,” said Paul Kotas, Amazon’s Senior Vice President of Worldwide Advertising.

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Architecture, condos, lincoln square, New Developments, Starchitecture, Upper West Side 

The former American Bible Society building (L); SOM’s new design for 1865 Broadway (R)

In the fall of 2015, the American Bible Society moved from their long-time home at Broadway and 61st Street to Philadelphia. Their Columbus Circle/Lincoln Center headquarters was built in 1965 by architects Roy O. Allen Jr. and Donald C. Smith of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, who created a 12-story Brutalist structure that was the first in the city constructed with load-bearing, pre-cast concrete exterior walls. But with the institution’s recent departure came the sale of the building at 1865 Broadway for $300 million to AvalonBay Communities. The developer returned to the original architectural firm to create a new condo-rental tower at the site, and CityRealty has now uncovered SOM‘s first official rendering of what will replace their former work, which, interestingly enough, harkens back to the Brutalist aesthetic.

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Featured Story

Architecture, Features

SOM new school

Image courtesy of SOM by James Ewing

Historically, college dorms have been characterized by anything but great architecture. While many older institutions rent out rooms (“cells” may be a more apt description) in neo-gothic structures, newer institutions tend to house students in some of the world’s least inspiring modernist buildings (for an example, head over to the I.M. Pei towers that dominate NYU’s University Village). More recently, however, at least some colleges and universities have begun to acknowledge that where students live may have an impact on their performance. Financially savvy institutions have also started to link student housing options to student retention rates.

As a result, on many campuses, drab gray concrete structures with prison-size windows are finally giving way to light, glass and wood and to an entirely new range of built-in amenities. This means that whether or not all students know it, a growing number of them are now living in buildings on the cutting edge of contemporary design.

Ahead, we highlight some of the best and most innovative in the new york area

Architecture, Construction Update, Morningside Heights, New Developments

Barnard College New Teaching and Learning Center

After much deliberation, Barnard College’s administration announced plans last year to build a new teaching and learning center at the heart of its four-acre campus in Morningside Heights. Now with demolition of the former library nearly complete, groundwork and excavation for the new 11-story structure will soon begin.

The upcoming 128,000-square-foot interdisciplinary building is being designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and will incorporate several tiers of terraces to increase outdoor access for students and faculty. The 189-foot-tall structure aspires to become the college’s hub of academic and intellectual life and will feature an updated and expanded library, a digital commons with five teaching labs, and a computational science center that will connect to the adjacent Altschul Hall. All three of the resources will utilize new media and digital technologies to enhance student learning methods.

More details ahead

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