nyc ferry

City Living

Photo by Kreg Holt

Starting November 1, Governors Island will be open to the public year-round for the first time in its history, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Tuesday. Located in the heart of New York Harbor, the 172-acre island has typically had a limited season that ran between May and October but plans to make the site a 24/7 community have been in the works for nearly two decades. With the island open all year, the city also announced it will make Governors Island a daily stop on NYC Ferry, as well as launch a new route that departs from the Lower East Side. Find out more

Staten Island, Transportation

Photo: NYC Ferry

Starting next week, commuters from Staten Island will have another way to get to Manhattan. Launching Monday, August 23, the newest NYC Ferry route takes riders up the Hudson River for the first time and stops in Midtown West, with a total travel time of about 35 minutes from St. George. With this latest route, NYC Ferry now officially serves all five boroughs.

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Policy, Transportation

Photo by Joe Mabel on Flickr

After the U.S. Coast Guard halted service on nearly two dozen New York Waterway ferries for safety issues over the weekend, commuters on Monday faced extensive delays and modified routes. On Sunday, the Coast Guard said it suspended 23 of 32 ferries operated by the company after multiple inspections found them to be “operationally unfit.” As of Monday afternoon, 15 ferries remained out of service.

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Policy, Transportation

New York's first citywide ferry, citywide ferry, nyc ferry, hornblower nyc ferry

Image © 6sqft

A majority of New York City Ferry riders are white and wealthy, the Daily News reported on Monday. According to a survey conducted by the city’s Economic Development Corporation, which operates the ferry system alongside Hornblower, more than 60 percent of NYC Ferry riders are white with an average annual income between $75,000 and $99,000. In March, a study from the Citizens Budget Commission found the NYC Ferry costs the city $10.73 per rider, about 10 times that of subway subsidies.

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Policy, Transportation

Via NYC Ferry

According to a report from the Citizens Budget Commission (CBC) “Swimming in Subsidies,” the three-year-old NYC Ferry transports fewer people in a year than the city’s subway moves in a day. But at about $10.37 per rider, the ferry’s operating subsidy is 10 times that of the New York City Transit system. And an expansion of the system was recently announced that will mean even higher public subsidies–as much as $24.75 per ride for the Coney Island route. Why the steep subsidies? First, operating costs are high due to long routes and leisure-oriented ridership. And revenue is low because fares are tied to subway and bus fares.

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