Norman Foster

Architecture, Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper West Side 

All renderings designed by Foster+ Partners, courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

Billionaire Bill Ackman is getting his Central Park-facing rooftop glass penthouse designed by Norman Foster after all. The Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday approved plans from the hedge fund founder to build a glass penthouse addition on top of a 100-year-old Upper West Side co-op building where he owns an apartment. First presented last November as a two-level glass box on the roof of 6-16 West 77th Street, the approved proposal includes a scaled-down design and more muted materials.

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Major Developments, Midtown East, New Developments

Rendering: dbox / Foster + Partners

JPMorgan Chase on Thursday unveiled the design for its massive new global headquarters in Midtown East, set to become one of New York City’s tallest buildings. Roughly three years after the project was approved by the city and a year after construction began, fresh renderings show off the Foster + Partners-designed tower at 270 Park Avenue, which will soar nearly 1,400 feet and be all-electric. The building, which will house up to 14,000 employees, boasts a unique “fan-column” structure that is lifted about 80 feet above street level as well as a new public plaza on Madison Avenue.

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Architecture, Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Upper West Side 

All renderings designed by Foster+ Partners, courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

A plan funded by one of the world’s wealthiest people and designed by one of the world’s most famous architects still can’t get approved in New York City. Billionaire Bill Ackman on Tuesday presented to the Landmarks Preservation Commission his plan to construct a new glass penthouse addition designed by Norman Foster on top of a 100-year-old Upper West Side co-op building where he owns an apartment. After hours-long public testimony, LPC Chair Sarah Carroll sent Ackman and his team back to the drawing board, calling for a scaled-down design.

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Financial District, Major Developments, Starchitecture

Photo by Phil Dolby on Flickr

Twenty years after the terrorist attacks of September 11, the redevelopment of Lower Manhattan’s World Trade Center complex is nearly complete. But one tower still hasn’t got off the ground. After architecture firm changes and financing problems, developer Silverstein Properties said construction is set to begin in the coming months on 2 World Trade Center with a new design from Norman Foster’s Foster + Partners. As first reported by Commercial Observer, the developer is close to securing an anchor tenant, which would lead to a construction loan and the start of work within “the next six to 12 months.”

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Midtown East, New Developments, Starchitecture

Trading floor rendering courtesy of L&L Holding

It’s been more than five years since L&L Holding Company broke ground on the 47-story Norman Foster-designed office tower at 425 Park Avenue, but it’s finally nearing the finish line. The 897-foot building is notable for its triple-height diagrid floors and the set of three ornamental fins at the crown that will be illuminated at night. It will be the first full-block tower along this stretch of Park Avenue in half a century, joining the likes of the Seagram Building and Lever House.

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Financial District, Major Developments, Starchitecture

2 World Trade Center, BIG, Bjarke Ingels, NYC starchitecture

Previous rendering of 2 World Center via DBOX, courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

It looks like Norman Foster’s design for 2 World Trade Center might rise after all. First unveiled in 2006, the original Foster + Partners proposal was scrapped in 2015 for Bjarke Ingels’ stacked tower, which was deemed more suitable to prospective media tenants. After leases with Fox and News Corp. fell through in 2016, the future of the tenant-less tower has remained uncertain. Absent any takers, developer Larry Silverstein is now pivoting back to the Foster vision, the New York Post reports. The old design is being “significantly modified to be more reflective of contemporary needs and taste,” Silverstein said.

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Featured Story

Architecture, Features, NYC Guides, Starchitecture

The Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, One World Trade Center: all buildings that instantly come to mind when you think of the iconic New York City skyline. But more and more new skyscrapers are beginning to pop up in that classic view. And while it’s likely many an architects’ dream to contribute a design to the most famous skyline in the world, only a handful of world-renowned “starchitects” get to do it. Ahead, 6sqft has rounded up 11 starchitect-designed condo buildings that you can actually live in, from veterans like Robert A.M. Stern and Renzo Piano to some more up-and-comers like David Adjaye and Bjarke Ingels.

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Architecture, Construction Update, New Developments, Red Hook

Red Hoek Point, Norman Foster, Red Hook waterfront, Red Hook development, Thor Equities

According to sources close to the project, plans for Norman Foster’s Red Hoek Point, a 7.7-acre commercial campus at the former Revere Sugar Factory on the Red Hook shoreline, appear to be getting scrapped, The Real Deal reports. The website still advertises the “revolutionary office campus on the Brooklyn waterfront,” but Thor Equities is reportedly going to abandon the 800,000-square-foot complex and replace it with warehousing, a change of course that Thor’s founder Joseph Sitt may have been considering as early as last October, as new renderings for Red Hoek Point were being developed.

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Midtown East, New Developments

Image via Flickr

In response to pushback, JPMorgan Chase will be redesigning its planned 1,400-foot office tower at 270 Park Avenue with additional open public space, as Crain’s first reported. Under the East Midtown rezoning, new developments are required to provide 10,000 square feet of public space, but because two-thirds of the site sits above the Grand Central Terminal train shed, architects for the project argued they could only come up with 7,000 square feet. This notion was challenged by members of Manhattan Community Board 5 and elected officials. JPMorgan has now agreed to submit new designs increasing the size of the public space to 10,000 square feet and making it an open-air area instead of enclosed as it was in the initial design proposal.

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Midtown East, New Developments

The existing 270 Park Avenue, MikePScott via Flickr

Demolition permits were filed Tuesday for the JPMorgan Chase HQ at 270 Park Avenue, CityRealty reports. The building will be the tallest planned demolition in history. The filing is a significant step for the bank on the way to replacing the 1.5-million-square-foot Modernist tower previously known as the Union Carbide Building with a 2.5-million-square-foot skyscraper, to be designed by British Pritzker Prize winner Norman Foster/Foster + Partners architectural firm.

Down with the old, up with the new

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