Norman Foster

Recent Sales, Sutton Place 

3 Sutton Place, 428 East 58th Street, NYC condo buildings, Norman Foster, Foster + Partners

The original rendering of 3 Sutton Place by Foster + Partners

Following a contentious legal battle, Gamma Real Estate has won the foreclosure auction and closed on the $86 million acquisition of 3 Sutton Place, a development site where the firm plans on building a 700-foot-tall condominium tower. As Commercial Observer learned, this includes three neighboring lots at 428-432 East 58th Street between First Avenue and Sutton Place. Earlier this year, 6sqft explained that a bankruptcy judge authorized the sale of the property after Joseph Beninati’s Bauhouse Group failed to pay back creditors. While Stephen B Jacobs remains the executive architect, Gamma has hired Thomas Juul-Hansen, a Danish-born architect, who will design the skyscraper.

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Architecture, hudson yards, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

When completed, Related Companies‘ and Oxford Properties Group’s 50 Hudson Yards will be the city’s most expensive office building, coming in at $3.94 billion. To make starchitect Norman Foster‘s pricey vision a reality, the developers had filed an application with the New York City Industrial Development Agency to take advantage of financial incentives that were enacted in 2006 to encourage development in Hudson Yards. And according to a new report in Crain’s, the agency has approved $195 million in such tax breaks, which include making fixed payments towards the 985-foot tower’s development costs instead of paying property taxes that vary from year to year, as well as receiving a discount on the mortgage recording taxes.

Find out more right here

Architecture, hudson yards, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

It’s been less than a month since it was revealed that starchitect Norman Foster would be designing the Related Companies‘ and Oxford Properties Group’s 50 Hudson Yards commercial tower, but the developers have already pegged the cost of the project at $3.94 billion, which will make it the city’s most expensive office building, reports The Real Deal. The 985-foot tower, where BlackRock has already signed a 20-year lease for 15 floors, will surpass One Vanderbilt‘s projected $3.14 billion price tag and Bjarke Ingels’ planned $3 billion+ High Line tower known as The Spiral, as well as One World Trade Center‘s current record of $3.8 billion.

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New Developments, Sutton Place 

Sutton 58 by Foster + Partners

When Gamma Real Estate’s $98 million bid won the debt-beleaguered site at 3 Sutton Place just a couple weeks ago at a bankruptcy auction, 6sqft noted that the firm could either re-sell, bring the original plan for a 900-foot condo tower by starchitect Norman Foster to fruition, take on a joint-venture partner, or move forward with a plan of its own. The Real Deal now tells us that Gamma filed plans with the Department of Buildings for an 844-foot, 67-story tower with 389 apartments. However, he says this is to “safeguard the property” while the firms weighs all the aforementioned options.

Find out more this way

Architecture, hudson yards, Major Developments, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

It’s been 14 months since developer Related Companies bought the site of a former McDonald’s at 34th Street and 10th Avenue, the final parcel needed to complete Hudson Yards. Initial reports said the site of 50 Hudson Yards would hold a 62-story, 1,000+ foot commercial tower, but Related and Oxford Properties Group have now revealed that the structure will rise 58 stories and 985 feet and be designed by starchitect Norman Foster. As first reported by Curbed, the news comes on the heels of BlackRock’s decision to sign a 20-year lease for 15 floors, or 850,000 square feet, in the building, leaving their long-time Park Avenue home in a show of confidence in the mega-complex.

Get more details ahead

Architecture, Construction Update, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

red hoek point waterfront rendering, norman foster red hook

In October 6sqft reported that work on Thor Equities‘ 7.7-acre waterfront office and retail complex, architect Norman Foster‘s first Brooklyn commission, had begun. A recent meeting between the developers’ representatives and community members to discuss plans for the 818,000-square-foot two-building project on the former site of Red Hook’s Revere Sugar Refinery–known as Red Hoek Point–revealed concerns that the Red Hook community is being excluded from development plans.

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condos, New Developments, Policy, Sutton Place 

Sutton 58 by Foster + Partners

Despite the fact that the site is headed to the auction block next month, local residents and elected officials are rallying to prevent the possible construction of a 950-foot condo tower on East 58th Street in tony Sutton Place. Curbed reports that the group, which includes Councilmen Ben Kallos and Dan Garodnick and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, have submitted a plan to the City Planning Commission that proposes a height cap of 260 feet for the area bounded by East 52nd and East 59th streets east of First Avenue where there is currently no limit on how tall apartment towers can be.

Read more

Architecture, condos, New Developments, Sutton Place 

3 Sutton Place, 428 East 58th Street, NYC condo buildings, Norman Foster, Foster + Partners

The 262,000-square-foot project that includes plans for a 900-foot-tall luxury condominium tower drawn up by British architect Sir Norman Foster of Foster + Partners that embattled developer Joseph Beninati had hoped to build in the heart of Sutton Place is set to be auctioned next month, according to Crains. As 6sqft previously reported, the sale of the property at 3 Sutton Place was authorized in September to pay back creditors and partners who were owed money from the derailed project, and a source has told Crain’s that an auction is scheduled for December 13 with bids due by December 8.

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Architecture, Construction Update, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

red hoek point waterfront rendering, norman foster red hook

After revealing plans in June for Norman Foster‘s first commission in Brooklyn, Thor Equities now announces that work has commenced on Red Hoek Point, the 7.7-acre waterfront office campus. The press release also brings news that the project’s two buildings, totaling 818,000 square feet, will become “the largest new heavy timber structure in North America.”

More details ahead

Architecture, condos, New Developments, Sutton Place 

3 Sutton Place, 428 East 58th Street, NYC condo buildings, Norman Foster, Foster + Partners

A US Bankruptcy Court judge has approved a plan to sell the 3 Sutton Place site at at 426-432 East 58th Street, one of the city’s most luxurious old enclaves, reports the New York Post. Brokers have been selected to conduct the marketing of the 262,000-square-foot project that includes plans for a 900-foot-tall condominium tower drawn up by British architect Sir Norman Foster of Foster + Partners.

Find out more

Architecture, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

280 Richards Street, Revere Sugar Factory, Norman Foster, Red Hook development, Thor Equities

In June, 6sqft revealed renderings of Norman Foster‘s first commission in Brooklyn, the waterfront complex from Thor Equities planned for the former Revere Sugar Factory site in Red Hook. The sole rendering showed “his signature mix of contemporary panache (glassy construction with a cantilevering portion) and contextual thoughtfulness (low-scale, boxy structures in keeping with the industrial area).”

Now, a second rendering comes to us via Curbed, which shows off the structure’s “undulating penthouses and combined 3.6 acres of green roof.” They’ve also noted that the project has an official website, leasing is underway, and it’s been dubbed Red Hoek Point, a play on the area’s Dutch name Roode Hoek from the 1600s.

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Architecture, New Developments, Red Hook, Starchitecture

Thor Red Hook development, Norman Foster, Red Hook waterfront, 280 Richards Street

Back in 2005, the Joesph Sitt-led Thor Equities spent $40 million on a vacant, 7.7-acre parcel of land in Red Hook that juts 700 feet into the Erie Basin, between the Ikea parking lot and the Fairway. Preliminary visions for the former Revere Sugar Factory site included retail, office space, and residential buildings, but according to a press release sent out today by Thor, there will be no housing.

Today’s major announcement, however, is the architect selection: Norman Foster will helm the design of the new waterfront office complex, which will “include two heavy timber frame buildings totaling more than 600,000 square feet of creative office space, and 23,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space.” Foster is a surprising choice for the project, as his commissions are typically flashy and in high-profile areas like Midtown or the Financial District. In fact, this will be his first building in Brooklyn. But the sole rendering shows his signature mix of contemporary panache (glassy construction with a cantilevering portion) and contextual thoughtfulness (low-scale, boxy structures in keeping with the industrial area).

More details ahead

Financial District, Starchitecture

2 world trade center

Foster’s original design

Nearly one year ago it was revealed that starchitect Bjarke Ingels would be taking over the design of 2 World Trade Center from Norman Foster as developer Silverstein Properties was in talks with Fox and News Corp. to make the tower their new headquarters. However, plans fell through in January when the media companies opted to remain at their Midtown headquarters at 1211 and 1185 Sixth Avenue.

Now without a tenant and two different designs in hand, Chairman Larry Silverstein is said to be weighing both options. “[The top of] Two was a distinguishing feature of Norman Foster’s design,” Silverstein told The Post. “Opposed to what Bjarke Ingels proposed. We can go in either direction. Which way, we are not sure yet.” But he did add that they were leaning towards Ingels’ design in discussions being had with prospective anchor tenants, which include BlackRock and JPMorganChase.

Find out more here

Featured Story

Architecture, Battery Park City, Carter Uncut, Features, Financial District, History, opinion, Urban Design

Skyline Wars: In Lower Manhattan, A New Downtown Is Emerging

By Carter B. Horsley, Mon, April 18, 2016

carters view downtown manhattan

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. This week Carter brings us his fourth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the evolution of the Lower Manhattan skyline.

Lower Manhattan at the start of the Great Depression was the world’s most famous and influential skyline when 70 Pine, 20 Exchange Place, 1 and 40 Wall Street, and the Woolworth and Singer buildings inspired the world with their romantic silhouettes in a relatively balanced reach for the sky centered around the tip of Lower Manhattan.

Midtown was not asleep at the switch and countered with the great Empire State, the spectacular Chrysler and 30 Rockefeller Plaza but they were scattered and could not topple the aggregate visual power and lure of Lower Manhattan and its proverbial “view from the 40th floor” as the hallowed precinct of corporate America until the end of World War II.

The convenience and elegance of Midtown, however, became increasingly irresistible to many.

More on the the history of Lower Manhattan and what’s in store

Architecture, condos, New Developments, Sutton Place 

3 Sutton Place, 428 East 58th Street, NYC condo buildings, Norman Foster, Foster + Partners

Bauhouse Group received permits just a week ago to raze a string of buildings at 428-432 East 58th Street in Sutton Place, and as 6sqft previously reported, the developer had tapped starchitect Norman Foster to design the 900-foot luxury residential tower. New York Yimby now has a first look at the building’s stunning views from 100 feet and up. From the top, “just some of the things you’ll be able to see are Central Park, the George Washington Bridge, 432 Park Avenue, the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, Sony Tower, the Citigroup Center, One World Trade Center, the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge, Roosevelt Island, the RFK Bridge, the Hell Gate Bridge, the United Nations, and the Williamsburg Bridge.”

More views and details

condos, Interiors, Midtown, New Developments, Starchitecture

100 east 53rd street, one hundred east fifty third street, norman foster, seagram building

Norman Foster is a master when it comes to contextual thoughtfulness, and his latest creation slated to rise next door to Mies van der Rohe’s iconic Seagram Building is one to be admired. Called One Hundred East Fifty Third Street (it takes its name from its address), the 63-story tower has just released a new set of interior renderings to Dezeen which show what the world’s richest will be snapping up when units hit the market next week.

Have a closer look inside

Architecture, Midtown

bjarke ingels nypl

Bjarke Ingels is most certainly on his way to New York architectural greatness, and scattered on the path behind him are the remains of Norman Foster‘s abandoned designs. Curbed has caught wind that the baby-faced starchitect is currently being considered for the redesign of the New York Public Library’s landmarked Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on 42nd Street. Yesterday afternoon, Theodore Grunewald, Vice President of the Committee to Save the New York Public Library, tweeted that both Bjarke Ingels and Ennead Architects were among the eight finalists being considered for the project—a list that also includes Studio Gang Architects and Robert A.M. Stern Architects.

Find out more here

Financial District, People, Starchitecture

Two World Trade Center rendering via Silverstein Properties

If you were still itching for more after Tuesday’s reveal of Bjarke Ingels’ design for Two World Trade Center, you’re in luck. The starchitect himself chatted with NY Yimby about his design process and inspirations behind the tower. He also revealed an interesting tidbit of information when asked when asked when he started the design process. “Let’s say in December,” he responded. Keep in mind, though, that word only broke about him replacing Norman Foster in April. Controversy aside, Ingels has a lot to say about this world-famous project, including why he thinks Foster’s plan was scrapped for his.

More revealing details right this way

Financial District, Starchitecture

2 World Trade Center, BIG, Bjarke Ingels, NYC starchitecture

Last week it was made official that starchitect Bjarke Ingels would replace Norman Foster as the designer of 2 World Trade Center, as News Corp. and 21st Century Fox closed in on a decision to move into the downtown tower. Now, without delay, Wired has revealed exclusive renderings of the Ingels redesign for the site, which will top out at 1,340 feet, just 28 feet shy of One World Trade Center.

The glass tower is defined by its striking setbacks that retract from the spot of the 9/11 attacks. Bjarke said in a statement, “To complete this urban reunification (the) tower will feel equally at home in Tribeca and the World Trade Center. From Tribeca, the home of lofts and roof gardens, it will appear like a vertical village of singular buildings stacked on top of each other…From the World Trade Center, the individual towers will appear unified, completing the colonnade of towers framing the 9/11 Memorial. Horizontal meets vertical. Diversity becomes unity.”

Watch a video of the architect discussing his new design

Featured Story

condos, Construction Update, Features, New Developments, Starchitecture

551W21 Norman Foster, Norman Foster architecture nyc, Foster + partnets, 551 west 21st street, scott resnick, sr capital

How do you follow up managing the building of the city’s newest and most exciting museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art on the Hudson River waterfront in the West Village, that kicks off the city’s most popular architectural extravaganza, the High Line elevated park? You commission Sir Norman Foster, one of the world’s master architects to rise to the starchitect challenge of the High Line, the city’s seemingly overnight sensation that is a phenomenal explosion of really interesting designs in a city too long mired in architectural mediocrity and bogged down mightily by the burden of rampant NIMBYism, the well-intentioned but dreaded Not In My Back Yard syndrome.

Scott Resnick, the head of SR Capital, has asked Foster to design a 19-story residential condominium building at 551 West 21st Street, half a block west of the High Line. “We’ve got the Hudson River,” Resnick retorts, casually destroying the real estate myth of “location, location, location.”

This, of course, is the back story to the supertall onslaught of the south end of Central Park. How can mere 250-footers at best compete with the 1,000-foot-plus stompin’ boots of oligarchs in and around the city’s platinum core of double-height retailing, grand hoteling and horse-and-buggy bashing? Talk about 76 trombones! Still, in a metropolis of more than eight-million yarns, there is eternal hope for the spunky “little guys,” “da bums.”

Inside Foster’s new building in progress this way

Design, Events, Starchitecture

starchitect experience auctions for van alen institue

Want to get some one-on-one time with the world’s most prolific architects? Well here’s your chance to pick the brains of the world’s leading creatives—and go on an adventure while you’re at it! The Van Alen Institute‘s annual Auction of Art + Design Experiences is in full swing and they’ve got some great outings for you to lift your paddle for. A ride in Norman Foster’s private helicopter, birdwatching with Jeanne Gang, and a private tour of Bjarke Ingels’s ski mountain/smoke-ring blowing power plant are just some of amazing excursions being offered—although there are far more relaxed options as well. For lovers of leisure: How does soaking in a hot tub with Charles Renfro of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, cocktails and three of your best buds sound?

info this way, including how to bid

Starchitecture, Video

norman foster interview

Do what you love. We’ve all heard it before, but for some reason it seems so much more poignant coming from the mouth of starchitect Norman Foster. In this latest installment of the Louisiana Channel, Marc-Christoph Wagner meets up with Foster in his Geneva home to get some career insight from the icon. Though Foster’s worlds are for those in the art and architecture professions, his passion and words can certainly be carried across the spectrum.

Watch the video here

Financial District, Major Developments, Starchitecture

Earlier this week, we reported that Bjarke Ingels was in talks to take over Norman Foster‘s design of 2 World Trade Center, noting that “if News Corporation and 21st Century Fox decide to move into 2 World Trade Center, as previously reported, developer Larry Silverstein may drop Foster’s design in favor of a new one by none other than starchitect of the moment, Bjarke Ingels of BIG.” Though Foster designed the tower ten years ago, it’s still the last at the site to rise. Ground broke in 2008, but in 2013 the Port Authority halted construction until tenants were lined up. Nothing has been decided yet, but Silverstein is said to be in talks with Mr. Ingels. How do you think this starchitect debacle is going to play out?

Images: Bjarke Ingels (L); Norman Foster’s design for 2 World Trade Center among the rest of the development

Financial District, Major Developments, Starchitecture

2 wtc bjarke ingels

Norman Foster may lose out on yet another major project in Manhattan. The Journal writes that if News Corporation and 21st Century Fox decide to move into 2 World Trade Center, as previously reported, developer Larry Silverstein may drop Foster’s design in favor of a new one by none other than starchitect of the moment, Bjarke Ingels of BIG.

Find out more here

Construction Update, Financial District, Major Developments

2 world trade center

Norman Foster‘s 88-story tower, destined for the last unoccupied site of the World Trade Center complex, could finally get the legs it needs to move forward. The New York Times reports that media giants News Corporation and 21st Century Fox, both headed by Rupert Murdoch, are in talks with the Port Authority and developer Larry Silverstein to make the long-stalled 1,349-foot skyscraper their next home. The move would relocate a number of News Corp. and Fox’s top brands—which include the NY Post and the Wall Street Journal—and give 2 WTC what it needs to resume construction as required by the Port Authority; namely a solid anchor tenant.

Ground was broken on the tower way back in 2008 and slated for completion in 2016, but in 2013 the Port Authority put a hold on construction until tenants could be found for occupancy.

More on the move forward here

condos, New Developments, Starchitecture, Sutton Place 

Foster and Partners East 58th Street Tower, Bauhouse Group, Skyscraper, Sutton Place

Rendering of the new tower (L); The four-building assemblage at 426-432 East 58th Street (R)

First spotted by the eagle-eyes at SkyscraperPage, a New York Press article has given us our first look at a potential 900-foot skyscraper reportedly designed by Foster + Partners and developed by the Bauhouse Group. The New York City-based real estate development and investment firm had recently closed on the three-building $32 million rental portfolio in tony Sutton Place at 428-432 East 58th Street. In March, the firm acquired a fourth property at 426 East 58th Street.

According to the New York Press story, “A sales brochure put together by Cushman and Wakefield dubs the project as the ‘Sutton Place Development’… there are indications that Bauhouse is looking to offload the site to another developer, and that whoever winds up buying the lot could build even higher than 900 feet.” Bauhouse is expected to release further details and renderings to the community this spring.

More details ahead

Real Estate Wire

norman foster
  • Have a look inside construction at BIG’s pyramid at 625 West 57th Street. [Field Condition]
  • A 269,000-square-foot tower designed by Foster + Partners will rise at 426-432 East 58th Street. The developer, Bauhouse, plans to raze four properties in Sutton Place to create the 95-unit building. [6sqft inbox]
  • Manhattan condo inventory hit an historic low in February. [NYDN]
  • The rise of passive house building in the city. [NYT]
  • Pritzker Prize-winning architect Alvaro Siza will design a NYC condo tower. [Curbed]
  • A Chinese buyer has scooped up a $30 million condo at One57. [TRD]
  • Hudson Companies plans to bring 520 apartments to Prospect Lefferts Gardens. [CO]

Images: Norman Foster via e-Architect (L); Construction on BIG’s project. © Field Condition  (R)

Starchitecture, Video

hearst tower nyc, norman foster in the hearst tower, drone tour hearst tower

In 2006, the doors of the Hearst Tower were swung open for business. The design of starchitect Norman Foster, the building was one of the most cutting-edge of its time, lauded for its diagrid form, its green construction, and the then-radical approach of marrying the old with the new. Apart from becoming one of New York’s most iconic structures, the building also holds a special cultural significance in city’s history: It was the first skyscraper to break ground after September 11th. Now, a decade later, Foster has returned to the Hearst Tower to mark its anniversary and reflect on his creation.

Watch the film here

Design, Transportation

Foster + Partners, Norman Foster, YachtPlus, Alen 68

Norman Foster has designed some of the most futuristic structures in the world. From the Gherkin in London to the Heart Tower in New York, his creations are unexpected and tech-focused. But did you know that Foster + Partners dabbles in boat design? They’ve just launched (no pun intended) the new Alen Yacht 68. The sleek schooner is not quite as ground-breaking as the firm’s architectural works, but it “combines the elegant social spaces of a cruising yacht with the fun of a day boat.”

See what this expertly-designed yacht has to offer

Real Estate Wire

b2 , b2 modular tower, b2 tower, shop architects tower , atlantic yards, pacific park
  • It’s cheaper to buy than rent in a number of US cities. [Business Insider]
  • Forest City is suing Skanska over the Pacific Park (formerly the Atlantic Yards) B2 modular tower. Skanska issued a Stop Work Order last week over cost overruns, and Forest City is now countering with a lawsuit saying Skanska agreed to a “fixed price” and any issues are due to the builder’s own “failures and missteps”. [Curbed]
  • The New York Times Editorial Board is in favor of cutting deals with private developers if it means bringing more affordable housing stock to NYC. [NYT]
  • The New York City Department of Transportation breaks ground on the second phase of Fordham Plaza’s reconstruction in the Bronx. Grimshaw is the architect behind the design. [Architect’s Newspaper]
  • Op-ed: Brooklyn Bridge Park can be maintained without building any of these 14 new high-rises on the park. The park is poised to come into as much as $200M when tax breaks expire starting 2018. [NYDN]
  • Developer Aby Rosen Instagramed an image of what the interiors of the Norman Foster-designed 610 Lexington Avenue will look like. [Curbed]

Images: B2 (left). Image by Field of Schemes; Manhattan aerial (right). Image Wiki Commons

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