gilded age

Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Upper East Side

Photo courtesy of The Corcoran Group

A mansion-sized 14-room duplex at 740 Park Avenue, a building considered to be Manhattan’s most luxurious residential address, is now on the market for $26,000,000. Built in 1929 by James T. Lee, grandfather of Jacqueline Bouvier (later Kennedy Onassis), who lived there as a girl, the Art Deco building was designed by Rosario Candela. One of its first notable residents was John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who resided in a duplex similar to the one featured here.

Step inside one of the city’s grandest homes

Connecticut, Cool Listings

Photo courtesy of Douglas Elliman

Known as Stoneleigh Manor, this landmarked estate at 255 Brushy Ridge Road in New Canaan, Connecticut, designed by renowned American architect Stanford White, was built in 1903 for Charles E. Diefenthaler and his wife Antonia F. Fischer as a summer getaway. Asking $5,199,000, the home has been restored by its current owners with care taken to honor its 118-year history while adding modern infrastructure and sensibility.

Step inside this historic hilltop estate

Featured Story

Features, History

The history of New York City’s original rooftop bars

By Lucie Levine, Wed, April 20, 2022

Casino Roof Garden, 1899 via NYPL Digital Collections

How many summer evenings have you spent at a rooftop bar? While the rooftop bar was indeed born and bred in New York City, it’s nothing new. Even before New York was a city of skyscrapers, denizens of Gotham liked to take their experiences to vertical extremes. And when it comes to partying, New Yorkers have been conquering new heights, drink in hand, since 1883. That year, impresario Rudolf Aronson debuted a roof garden on the top of his newly built Casino Theater on 39th Street and Broadway. The rooftop garden was soon a Gilded Age phenomenon, mixing vaudeville and vice, pleasure and performance, for well-heeled Bon-Vivants who liked to spend their summers high above the sweltering streets.

Get the scoop

Cool Listings, Upper West Side 

Photo credit: LPG for Sotheby’s International Realty

Asking $65,000,000, the 12,000-square-foot, seven-story Renaissance Revival-style townhouse at 25 Riverside Drive (h/t WSJ) on Manhattan’s Upper West Side harkens back to the city’s Gilded Age, when Riverside Park was lined with single-family mansions. Unmistakeable from the outside, the palatial corner property with rounded facades of limestone and brick has breathtaking river and palisades views from three exposures, 70 windows, and a rooftop conservatory. Built in the 1890s, this unique home was designed by prominent architect C.P.H. Gilbert for American Book Company editor-in-chief Herbert Horace Vail.

Tour this amazing Riverside Drive mansion

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Manhattan

The Cornelius Vanderbilt II Mansion on 57th Street and 5th Avenue, now demolished. Photo via A.D. White Architectural Photographs, Cornell University Library.

New York City’s Fifth Avenue has always been pretty special, although you’d probably never guess that it began with a rather ordinary and functional name: Middle Road. Like the 1811 Commissioner’s Plan for Manhattan, which laid out the city’s future expansion in a rational manner, Middle Road was part of an earlier real estate plan by the City Council. As its name suggests, Middle Road was situated in the middle of a large land parcel that was sold by the council in 1785 to raise municipal funds for the newly established nation. Initially, it was the only road to provide access to this yet-undeveloped portion of Manhattan, but two additional roads were built later (eventually becoming Park Avenue and Sixth Avenue). The steady northwards march of upscale residences, and the retail to match, has its origins where Fifth Avenue literally begins: in the mansions on Washington Square Park. Madison Square was next, but it would take a combination of real-estate clairvoyance and social standing to firmly establish Fifth Avenue as the center of society.

More on how the gilded mansions of 5th Avenue came to be

Cool Listings, Upstate

All photos courtesy of Jump Visual for Ellis Sotheby’s International Realty

Once a boarding house frequented by celebrities of the Gilded Age, this 1867 colonial overlooking the Hudson River in Rockland County is on the market. Located at 91 River Road in Grandview, the Limont House, with six bedrooms and five-and-a-half-bathroom, is asking $1,825,000. The property, which includes a separate pool house, sits on the site of a former sandstone quarry and leads to nature trails on the former Erie Rail.

See inside

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.