black lives matter

Art

Photo courtesy of Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer’s office

First announced by Mayor Bill de Blasio as a celebration of Juneteenth last month, giant murals spelling out Black Lives Matter have been popping up across New York City, with the streets also officially co-named after the movement. There are eight large-scale murals total: Centre Street and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard in Manhattan, Richmond Terrace on Staten Island, 153rd Street in Queens, Joralemon and Fulton Streets in Brooklyn, Morris Avenue in the Bronx, and on Fifth Avenue in front of Trump Tower.

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Midtown, Policy

All photos by Michael Appleton/Mayoral Photography Office

After announcing last month that he’d be painting “Black Lives Matter” in front of Trump Tower, Mayor de Blasio today helped paint the mural in bright yellow letters outside the building on Fifth Avenue between 56th and 57th Streets. “Let’s show Donald Trump what he does not understand, let’s paint it right in front of his building for him,” the mayor said today.

Details here

City Living, Policy

Photo by Anthony Quintano on Flickr

Mayor Bill de Blasio on Friday unveiled the five streets that will be painted with a “Black Lives Matter” mural. The large artwork will be designed along Centre Street in Manhattan, Richmond Terrace on Staten Island, Joralemon Street in Brooklyn, 153rd Street in Queens, and Morris Avenue in the Bronx. Earlier this month, the mayor said the streets will also be renamed after the movement, in addition to the street painting. A similar mural dedicated to Black Lives Matter was painted on Fulton Street in Bed-Stuy last weekend.

Details here

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

11 ways to celebrate Juneteenth in NYC

By Devin Gannon, Fri, June 19, 2020

Photo by Erick Zajac on Unsplash

Juneteenth has been observed by African Americans nationwide for more than 150 years as a celebration of the day enslaved Black people were liberated in the United States. This year, as Black Lives Matter demonstrations continue across New York City, the holiday takes on special significance as a day of action, reflection, and education. New York officials are recognizing the weight of the anniversary by making Juneteenth an official state holiday and a city holiday, set to be observed by public schools next year. Although the festivals and cookouts of the past are on hold this year in light of the coronavirus, there are many virtual and socially distanced events happening across the city, from a digital day of dance to a cyclist-led Freedom Ride.

See the list

Featured Story

Features, Shop

Photo by Trnava University on Unsplash

The Black Lives Matter movement has strong roots in New York City, and with this in mind, 6sqft has put together a list of books about or related to New York City, all by Black authors. Including fiction and nonfiction, our list includes classics like Paule Marshall’s Brown Girl, Brownstones and James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time to contemporary works like Kiley Reid’s Such a Fun Age and Elaine Welteroth’s More Than Enough.

Check out the full list

holidays, Policy

Juneteenth to become New York State holiday

By Devin Gannon, Wed, June 17, 2020

Photo of New York State Capitol by wadester16 on Flickr

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Wednesday signed an executive order recognizing Juneteenth as a holiday for state employees and said he will introduce legislation to make it an official New York State holiday next year. Juneteenth marks the end of slavery in the United States in 1865 and is celebrated annually on June 19.

Details this way

Featured Story

Features, NYC Guides, Restaurants

35+ black-owned restaurants in NYC by borough

By Devin Gannon, Wed, June 10, 2020

Photo by Ajay Suresh on Flickr

The Black Lives Matter movement continues to grow in New York City and across the country, with many people looking to get involved, whether it’s donating to antiracist organizations or studying the history of the black experience in America. Another direct action New Yorkers can take to support the black community today is shopping at black-owned businesses. Lists and guides have popped up online in the last few weeks to bring attention to these mom and pop shops, with detailed resources from Black-Owned Brooklyn and this spreadsheet created by New Yorker food critic Hannah Goldfield. The app Eat Okra, which launched three years ago, is also a helpful resource that highlights most of the black-owned restaurants in NYC, which according to Eater, includes more than 2,500 restaurants. Ahead, we break down some of the best black-owned restaurants, cafes, and bars in every borough. It is no means a comprehensive list and we encourage our readers to share with us additional places to include.

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City Living

Book cover photos courtesy of NYPL

As the Black Lives Matter movement continues to grow across the country, take this opportunity to learn more about the experience of black Americans. The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture on Tuesday released a list of 95 books that foster a greater understanding of black history and culture. The Black Liberation Reading List was curated by Schomburg staff and focuses on works by black writers and scholars.

Learn more

Featured Story

City Living, Features, Museums

Photo by Eden, Janine, and Jim on Flickr

Although cultural institutions in New York City remain closed to the public because of the coronavirus, some are opening their lobbies to provide Black Lives Matter protestors a safe space, a restroom, snacks and water, WiFi, face masks, or just a place to recharge. The social media account “Open Your Lobby” launched last week on Twitter and Instagram to track the museums and theaters that are repurposing their space in support of protesters. According to the organizers, there are more than 70 organizations participating nationwide, with more than two dozen in New York City alone.

See the list

Featured Story

Features, NYC Guides

Photo a protest June 1, 2020, by Eden, Janine and Jim on Flickr

Demonstrations over the May 25 death of George Floyd continue across the country and New York City. For those seeking additional ways to advocate for antiracist policies, police accountability, and racial justice, we’ve compiled a guide to local NYC organizations that are advocating against institutional racism and supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. While this list is not complete, these resources hopefully can serve as a starting point to help New Yorkers navigate as allied communities during this time.

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Archtober2020