maps, Restaurants

women's history, grubhub

What could go better together than feminism and food delivery? Thanks to Grubhub, the online takeout service, hungry New Yorkers can now easily order from women-run restaurants. The company on Tuesday launched an app called RestaurantHER that aims to empower and promote women chefs and owners, who are often underrepresented and underpaid in the restaurant industry. Available nationwide, the app includes a map that looks similar to Grubhub’s typical page, but only highlights restaurants owned or co-owned by a woman or a kitchen led by a woman executive chef.

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Major Developments, Restaurants, South Street Seaport

A rendering of Pier 17’s proposed temporary rooftop structure via LPC/ Howard Hughes Corp.

The Howard Hughes Corporation has worked since 2010 to revitalize the Seaport District as a destination for New Yorkers, bringing more than 400,000 square feet of cultural and culinary space to the waterfront. The highlight of the $731 million redevelopment remains Pier 17, a four-story building designed by Achim Menges with a see-through canopy, dining options, an iPic theater, retail and more. The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the revised designs for the project in December and the New York Post has just learned more information about the project’s timeline, with nearly everything set to open at some point this year.

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Flatiron, History, Restaurants

New York’s iconic Flatiron building, built in 1902, gets plenty of attention for its distinctive, triangular design. But the massive restaurant that operated out of the landmark’s basement–known as The Flat Iron Restaurant and Cafe–has seemingly been lost to the ages. The basement restaurant allegedly could seat up to 1,500 guests. And by 1906, Madison Square had transformed from a desirable residential neighborhood for the city’s elite, as it had been in the Gilded Age, to a bustling commercial hub. The lengthy menu reflects that, with offerings that include affordable dishes of shellfish, meats, and sandwiches.

Check out the menu

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Features, New Developments, Nomad, real estate trends, Restaurants

A nomad is defined as “a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another in search of grasslands for their animals.” But it would be hard to imagine any Nomad resident ever straying for grasslands beyond Madison Square Park. After a series of incarnations over the years, Nomad is now a super hip, bustling neighborhood from morning through night with residents, technology businesses (it’s now being referred to as “Silicon Alley”), loads of retail (leaning heavily toward design), great architecture, hot hotels, and tons and tons of food.

Named for its location north of Madison Square Park, Nomad’s borders are a bit fuzzy but generally, they run east-west from Lexington Avenue to Sixth Avenue and north-south from 23rd to 33rd Streets. Douglas Elliman’s Bruce Ehrmann says, “Nomad is the great link between Madison Square Park, Midtown South, Murray Hill and 5th Avenue.”

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Lower East Side, Major Developments, New Developments, Restaurants

Essex Crossing, Market Line, NYC food hall, SHoP Architects

It’s been over a year since we got our first look at Market Line, the 150,000-square-foot market that will anchor the Essex Crossing mega-development. It will serve as the new home for the Lower East Side‘s iconic, 76-year-old Essex Street Market and boast two indoor parks, a beer garden, 150 food vendors, and 20 retail spaces–all adding up to the city’s largest food hall. Eater now has spotted a fresh set of renderings of Market Line, as well as the first vendor announcement. Among those who will be hawking their grub are Queens’ famed taco spot Tortilleria Nixtamal, the Upper East Side’s 100-year-old German meat market Schaller & Weber, and the East Village’s Ukrainian institution Veselka.

Check out the other vendors and more renderings

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City Living, Features, photography, Restaurants, The urban lens

Diners of NYC, Riley Arthur, Diner photography

Metro Diner on Broadway and 100th Street

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Riley Arthur documents NYC’s vanishing diners. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

“There’s no comparison to a New York diner experience,” says photographer Riley Arthur, which is what led her to start documenting all of the establishments throughout the five boroughs. Though she recently moved from Astoria to Florida, over the past two-and-a-half years she’s photographed roughly 215 diners (“I’ve lost count,” she says), usually hitting 10-12 a day and ordering a matzo ball soup at each! Since she began, at least a dozen diners have closed, usually due to rising rents, but Riley still has about 60 left to photograph. She shares her journey on the popular Instagram account Diners of NYC, where you’ll see everything from the faux-stone and shiny metal facades to the greasy bacon and eggs to the massive plastic menus to the neon signs and leather banquettes. Riley shared a set of her snapshots with 6sqft and filled us in on her process and favorite spots.

See Riley’s photos here

hudson yards, Major Developments, Restaurants

30 Hudson Yards, Related Companies, Oxford Properties, KPF, Kohn Pedesen Fox, TIme Warner, KKR & Co (60)

Rendering of the observation deck at 30 Hudson Yards, via Related Companies

Another deal has been inked for the massive Hudson Yards project, a 26-acre complex developed by Related Companies and Oxford Properties Group, and it will definitely reach new heights. On Tuesday, Related announced that London restaurant and catering company Rhubarb will run a 10,000-square-foot public space in the nearly 1,300-foot supertall 30 Hudson Yards. Rhubarb will operate a bar, restaurant, and event space on the 92nd floor, one floor above the tower’s observation deck, which at 1,100 feet will be the highest outdoor deck in the city. According to Eater and the Post, the company will also open a 5,800-square-foot restaurant on the fifth floor and an indoor-outdoor bar at the observatory.

Find out more

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Features, History, Manhattan, Restaurants

Cracking open the stories of NYC’s most historic bars

By Emily Nonko, Tue, November 14, 2017

McSorley’s in 1937, taken by Bernice Abbott. Via MCNY.

With rising rents and ever-changing commercial drags, New Yorkers can take comfort that the city still holds classic bar haunts, some of which have been serving booze for over 100 years. Some watering holes, like the Financial District’s Fraunces Tavern, played a crucial role in major historic events. Others, like Midtown’s 21 Club and the West Village’s White Horse Tavern, hosted the most notable New Yorkers of the time. These institutions all survived Prohibition–managing to serve alcohol in both unique and secretive ways–and figured out ways to serve a diverse, ever-changing clientele of New Yorkers up to this day.

6sqft rounded up the seven most impressive bars when it comes to New York City history–and they’ve got the legends, stories, and ghosts to prove it. From longshoreman bars to underground speakeasies to Upper East Side institutions, these are the watering holes that have truly withstood New York’s test of time.

This way for the roundup

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Features, History, Restaurants

eggs benedict

Image via Wiki Commons

Brunch is inarguably one of New Yorkers’ favorite pastimes, and if there’s one dish that represents the lazy, and perhaps boozy, Sunday afternoon meal it’s Eggs Benedict — poached eggs and Canadian bacon on an English muffin, topped with hollandaise sauce. Which is why it’s not surprising to learn that the egg creation originated right in our fine city. There is however, a bit of controversy over just who gets the credit for inventing it. Was it the Wall Street bigwig who was looking for a hangover cure at the Waldorf Hotel? Or was it Charles Ranhofer, the legendary Delmonico’s chef who published a recipe for it in his cookbook “The Epicurean?”

The mysterious case of Eggs Benedict unfolds this way

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Features, NYC Guides, Restaurants

A borough-by-borough guide to NYC’s food halls

By Devin Gannon, Tue, October 10, 2017

Cronuts. Raclette. Poke bowls. Avocado toast. While the list of trendy cuisines making a splash in New York City’s food scene appears endless, food halls are making it easier for New Yorkers to try a bit of everything all under one roof. The city is experiencing a boom in this casual dining style; real estate developers opt to anchor their buildings with food halls, as all-star chefs choose food halls to serve their celebrated dishes. Ahead, follow 6sqft’s guide to the city’s 24 current food halls, from old standby Chelsea Market to Downtown Brooklyn’s new DeKalb Market, as well as those in the pipeline, planned for hot spots like Hudson Yards and more far-flung locales like Staten Island.

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