Design

Cool Listings, Green Design, Park Slope

331 8th Street, Park Slope, townhouses, passive house, cool listings, townhouses

Though it would be an enviable Brooklyn townhouse even without the certification, this unique  home at 331 8th Street in Park Slope got a complete Passive House retrofit in 2013. It’s a shining 21st century energy-efficient example; better yet, the home’s many period details were preserved. Asking $4 million, the 3,675 square-foot three-story home has wood molding, original doors and slate mantles across four bedrooms, three full baths, a powder room and a fully finished basement. A total of four outdoor spaces multiplies what we love about townhouse living.

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Design, Green Design, Midtown

Rendering via Sam Biroscak/ Design Pavilion 2018

New York City has 280 miles of scaffolding, totaling more than 7,700 sidewalk sheds in front of 7,752 buildings. Described as pervasive eyesores and sunlight-blockers, scaffolding has an unflattering reputation in the city. Artist Sam Biroscak is looking to change the public perception of these sidewalk sheds, by highlighting it as an “under-appreciated” urban element in his conceptual design. Dubbed Mossgrove, Biroscak’s project would create an architectural pavilion in Times Square made of two materials seen as nuisances: moss and scaffolding. The proposal calls for the installation be built during NYCxDESIGN, a nine-day event featuring interactive installations and talks. The theme of this year’s Design Pavilion will be “From This Day Forward” (h/t Untapped Cities).

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Architecture, Green Design, Technology

Image © Mengyi Fan

Pixel architects, Oliver Thomas and Keyan Rahimzadeh, designed “pixel façade,” a flexible biophilic façade system for the next generation of offices, acknowledging millennials strong desire to be happy in a conducive, natural workplace. Inspired by a Metals in Construction competition challenge, the duo designed a hypothetical building in Williamsburg with a strong connection to nature to house tech startups. Thomas told designboom: “the idea was to propose conceptual but realistic ideas for built products for the future.”

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Featured Story

Art, Design, Events, Features, Greenpoint

Australian-born, New York-based hyperrealist artist Cj Hendry–whose past work, which is often sold out through Instagram and has been quite dominated by blacks, whites and grays–created an amazing color exploration in a 22,000-square-foot Brooklyn warehouse. In each of the seven single-colored rooms, the self-described “fashion fangirl” Hendry’s MONOCHROME exhibit creates a color sensory experience centered around her new images of crumpled Pantone swatches. Everything from the walls to floors to clothes hanging to plants are the same color. It looks as if she was inspired by the 2018 Pantone color of the year, ultraviolet, for the bathroom. The rooms are built with lego-like Everblocks, creating somewhat prison-like walls in the most colorful jail ever.

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Art, Chinatown, Design, Urban Design

Canal Street Triangle, ODA Architects, Dragon's Gate, Chinatown Pavilion, public art NYC

As many other New York City ethnic neighborhoods have diminished or disappeared over the years, Chinatown continues to grow and prosper. Roughly bound by borders at Hester and Worth Streets to the north and south, and Essex and Broadway to the east and west, Chinatown is home to largest ethnic Chinese population outside of Asia. With this in mind, architecture firm ODA New York, known for prioritizing people over architecture, has proposed a unique and beautiful new gateway to the neighborhood at the Canal Street Triangle. ODA’s typical designs can be a bit boxy, constructed with heavier materials, but there is always a lightness to them, whether through the infusion of glass, archways, or greenery. Combining new technology with traditional Chinese symbolism, “Dragon Gate” will delicately weave the duality of Chinatown’s old and new into a strong structure, both in symbolism and material.

More renderings and details ahead

Featured Story

Features, real estate trends, stuff you should know, Technology

NYC skyline via Pexels; Bitcoin via Pexels

Just when you think you understand the world of cryptos, all you understand is how little you know. And when you do actually master a topic, it will change. Which is why to get you started, we’ve put together a 101 guide to cryptocurrencies and real estate transactions. From the technology behind digital currencies such as Bitcoin to their risks, the real estate market is ripe for potential when it comes to this burgeoning market.

Get your primer ahead

Central Park South, real estate trends, Technology

Photo via Wally Gobetz/Flickr

Cryptocurrencies make the wild west look tame. Yet despite their volatility, they’re becoming more of a presence in NYC real estate. Five days ago, when we reported on the first Bitcoin closings in Manhattan, the value of Bitcoin was $8,592. It is currently $7,999. According to a CNBC report, Chimera, a group of foreign investors interested in buying the Plaza Hotel, is considering offering partial payment for the transaction in a new cryptocurrency. Chimera has proposed the creation of the “Plaza Token,” an asset-backed securitized token, to raise more than $375 million. They are being advised about this initial coin offering by a company called Securitize. “This would give cryptocurrency investors the chance to diversify into luxury real estate and receive certain concessions inside the Plaza Hotel,” CNBC reports.

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Cool Listings, Design, Interiors, Upper East Side

Designer Francine Coffey brought an elegant aestheitc–inspired by American history and the Federal era–to her co-op spanning the full parlor floor of the Upper East Side mansion at 36 East 69th Street. The prewar, baronial-feeling home spans 1,425 square feet, all of it dripping with lavish details that include fireplaces, French doors, wood moldings and decorative ceilings. Coffey has listed the grand spread for a grand total of $2.25 million.

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City Living, Furniture

The table, courtesy of Floyd

Is there anything you can’t get delivered same-day in NYC? New Yorkers have always been able to get pizza at a moment’s notice but now you can get restaurant deliveries, pharmacy items, groceries (even Walmart, which doesn’t have any local stores, is getting on that game), wine and, yes, sex toys.

Now, Fast Company reports that newcomer Floyd, a Detroit-based furniture company, will deliver same-day furniture. Most furniture companies take 6-8 weeks from order time to delivery but Floyd is taking notes from Amazon and shaking things up: “We saw [same-day delivery] as a real differentiator, changing how people buy furniture.” For a company that wants to dethrone IKEA, taking notes from Amazon is probably a good start.

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real estate trends, Technology

Bitcoin hits the NYC real estate market for the first time

By Michelle Colman, Thu, March 22, 2018

389 East 89th Street © Evan Joseph and an image of Bitcoin via Pexels

Yesterday, the New York Post reported that real estate developer Ben Shaoul of Magnum Real Estate Group has two units under Bitcoin contract at 389 East 89th Street–the first condos to use the payment method in NYC. One unit is a 624-square-foot studio that was asking $875,000, and the second is a 989-square-foot one-bedroom plus den that was asking $1.48 million. And according to Brick Underground, there are already a few very entrepreneurial landlords Brooklyn accepting Bitcoin for rent payment.

What does the future of Bitcoin and real estate look like?

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