Architecture, Design, Urban Design, West Village 

pier 40, DFA, rising sea levels, future new york

Local multidisciplinary creative firm DFA has come up with a concept for the rehabilitation of Manhattan’s rapidly disintegrating Pier 40 that would provide housing and other services, but would also adapt to the predicted rising sea levels of future New York City. Dezeen reports on the firm’s fascinating idea for a future-proof housing, commercial and recreation complex that rises from the Hudson River in the West Village and would be able to remain above water in the event of rising sea levels, while addressing the city’s dire need for affordable housing and the ability to resist flooding as a result of climate change.

Find out more about the future-proof floating pier

Architecture, Art, Design, hudson yards

the shed, hudson yard, shed opening

Rendering by NLÉ Works

About one year before opening in the spring of 2019, The Shed, the art center rising near Hudson Yards, will present a free event on an undeveloped lot at 10th Avenue and 30th Street. The multi-arts exhibit will happen between May 1st to May 13th, just one block away from the center’s future home. “We are temporarily transforming an empty lot into a flexible public space for new work, collaboration, and dialogue,” Alex Poots, CEO of The Shed said in a press release. That means a cool temporary space, designed by the architect Kunlé Adeyemi of NLÉ Works and artist Tino Sehgal, to host a variety of music, dance and performance.

Read more about the upcoming shows

Architecture, Green Design, Major Developments, New Jersey

michael green architecture, timber building, newark

Lotus Equity Group announced on Monday plans to bring the largest mass timber office building in the United States to the Newark waterfront. Michael Green Architecture has been tapped to design the 500,000-square-foot office building made with a wooden structure for Riverfront Square, a massive mixed-use development proposed for the Broad Street corridor of the Jersey neighborhood, according to the Wall Street Journal. The building will rise in three separate sections to six, eight and 11 stories tall and have a concrete foundation. Its columns, exterior panels,  elevators, stairwells and floor systems will be made of mass timber. Interiors will boast exposed wood with a facade covered in metal panels, brick or wood.

Find out more

Cool Listings, Green Design, Interiors, Tribeca

258 broadway, cool listings, tribeca, lofts

Even at first glance this architect-designed loft in Tribeca’s City Hall Tower at 258 Broadway seems to have all the best elements of downtown loft living: Beneath 14-foot ceilings, walls of windows wrap the space for views of City Hall Park and the neighborhood below, and a mezzanine level offers more sleeping and living room. But this $2.8 million co-op’s secret superpower is sustainability, from walls of recycled post-industrial denim insulation and sound isolation to 100 percent VOC-free YOLO paint.

Have a look around this amazing loft

Art, Green Design

Renderings courtesy of Austin+Mergold in collaboration with Maria Park, and consulting engineers Chris Earls (Cornell) and Scott Hughes (Silman)

“Oculi” is the latest winner of FIGMENT’s City of Dreams competition, an annual design contest challenging architecture and design firms to build a pavilion out of recycled materials to be assembled and displayed on Governor’s Island. Last summer, visitors to the island were graced with a pavilion made out of more than 300,000 aluminum cans (the number of cans used in NYC in an hour), melted down and cast into cracked clay. This year, the competition is highlighting metal grain bins. A design by the firm Austin+Mergold, in collaboration with Maria Park (of Cornell University) and consulting engineers Chris Earls and Scott Hughes, will reuse old metal grain bins for a pavilion that establishes a visual connection between urban and rural ways of life.

Read more on the winning proposal

Featured Story

Bushwick, Design, Features, Furniture, Where I Work

Pouch hammocks, Pouch Bushwick, indoor hammocks, El Salvador hammocks, Bushwick design studio

The pouch team, L to R: Textile Designer Taylor McMahon; Fabricator Emma Cook; Design Director Melissa Riling; Founder/CEO/Design Director Robert James Ramirez

6sqft’s series “Where I Work” takes us into the studios, offices, and off-beat workspaces of New Yorkers across the city. In this installment, we’re touring high-end interior hammock company Pouch‘s Bushwick studio.Want to see your business featured here? Get in touch!

Picture yourself lounging in a hammock. Perhaps you’re a kid on summer break in the backyard or on a trip to the islands relaxing on a beach. Wherever this vision takes you, it’s that weightless, carefree feeling that probably comes to mind, which is the sensation that Bushwick-based design collective Pouch is trying to recreate inside the home with their handmade hammocks. According to founder and design director Robert Ramirez, the company believes the feeling of being on vacation should be incorporated into everyday life and that their product provides “a moment of retreat and relaxation amid the craze of city life.”

Working with a group of artisans in El Salvador who employ a traditional Salvadoran weaving technique and a fellow Bushwick company that naturally dyes all the cotton (using materials like tree bark and avocado pits), Robert has taken his family’s roots and brought them to what is arguably the maker capital of the country. 6sqft recently visited Pouch’s Brooklyn studio to learn more about the company and see how the hammocks are made, step-by-step.

Learn more about Pouch and tour their studio

Featured Story

Architecture, Design, Features, Interviews, Williamsburg

360 Wythe Avenue, courtesy 320 and 360 Wythe/Flank

Last November, news broke that Manhattan-based firm Flank Architecture + Development would construct two mid-rise office and retail buildings made of timber in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the first to be built in New York in over a century. Located at 320 and 360 Wythe Avenues, they are currently rising three and five stories, constructed from raw Canadian wood, which will be engineered into nail-laminated timber panels. The timber structure will rise above the concrete foundation, then it’ll be covered by a brick facade.

Flank co-founder Mick Walsdorf has said the ambitious project “will expand the limits of traditional construction and usher in a new era of sustainability-minded building practices.” The firm has grown significantly since Walsdorf and Jon Kully were studying together at Columbia’s Graduate School for Architecture, envisioning the possibilities of a joint architecture and development firm. Since then Flank has tackled the development and design of residential and commercial projects across the city, from The Boerum condominium in Brooklyn to the condo conversion at 40 Walker Street in Tribeca.

With 6sqft, Mick discusses the history of the firm and the benefits of tackling both the architecture and development side of a project in New York City. He also gets into detail about why Flank decided to take on timber construction, and how construction is expected to unroll this year.

Keep reading for the full interview

Clinton Hill, Cool Listings, Design, Interiors

409 Vanderbilt, cool listings, carriage houses, clinton hill, brooklyn home company

We love the uniqueness of restored 19th century carriage houses, in part because we don’t see them on the market as often as standard-issue townhouses. In this case you get two chances at owning one: Adjacent carriage houses at 409 and 411 Vanderbilt Avenue in Clinton Hill just emerged from top-to-toe renovations by designer fix-and-flip favorites The Brooklyn Home Company. They’re up for sale for $3.4 million and $3.35 million, respectively.

See double, take the tours

Design, Interiors, ridgewood

white arrow, ridgewood, ridgewood renovation, queens

The plan to turn an early 1900s Ridgewood townhouse into a two-family home was also an opportunity for the Manhattan design firm White Arrow to design bold, modern interiors throughout. The two-story townhouse is now configured with an upper-level owner’s level, and a rental unit on the ground floor. More importantly, the spaces are finished with modern furniture, bursts of color, and a playfulness that makes it hard not to want to move right in.

Get the full look

Featured Story

Design, Features, Furniture, real estate trends

505 West 19th Street via Thomas Juul Hansen

Scandinavian design is on the rise in luxury residences. At first, that might seem like an oxymoron since Scandinavian design was founded on the principles of utility, affordability, and simplicity – and high-end residents are not. But luxe and Scandinavian design have found much common ground.

From its early 20th century roots, based on Germany’s Bauhaus school and developed in the Nordic region, to the mass-produced appeal of Ikea, the trend has certainly remained at the forefront of the design world. And perhaps now it’s seeing its biggest moment, serving as a major selling point for hot new NYC condo projects such as Carroll Gardens’ 145 President and being reimagined by of-the-moment firms like Morris Adjmi and Denmark’s own Thomas Juul-Hansen.

Read more


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