Design

Technology, Transportation

A jet snow thrower in action via MTA’s Flickr

No matter how Winter Storm Grayson is labeled by weather professionals–a bomb cyclone, bombogenesis or a winter hurricane–the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is more than ready to clear subways, buses and commuter railways of snow. The MTA maintains a fleet of super-powered snow throwers, jet-powered snow blowers and specially designed de-icing cars to tackle the icy mess. For this week’s storm, there will be 500 track switch heaters, 600,000 pounds of calcium chloride and 200,000 pounds of sand to melt snow and ice at subway stations.

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Brooklyn, Design, Historic Homes, Interiors, Williamsburg

Keren and Thomas Richter, the founders of Brooklyn-based design studio White Arrow, designed and renovated the top floor of a 1800s schoolhouse in South Williamsburg, converting the landmarked loft into a light-filled home. After purchasing the home in 2010, the couple reimagined the home with custom Victorian millwork, as well as salvaged doors, hardware, antique earthenware sinks and claw foot tubs. Known as the Historic Schoolhouse, the red-bricked building was designated by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 2013.

See inside

Design, holidays

Magness Design’s James Bond-themed lounge at Holiday House, via Costas Picadas

‘Tis the season for entertaining, but if you’re tired of the old standbys like pigs-in-a-blanket and playing Cards Against Humanity, interior designer Sarah Magness has some great tips on how to class things up and “entertain like Bond this holiday season.”

Sarah and her firm Magness Design recently worked with Italian furniture brand Promemoria on a masculine, Casino Royal- and James Bond-themed lounge at the Holiday House designer show house (more on that here). From investing in some key party pieces to taking the bar to the next level, Sarah’s ideas will have you hosting like a pro.

Get the tips here

Design, Interiors, Tribeca

tribeca, tribeca loft, tribeca renovation, office of architecture

Who needs walls in a large, lofty apartment when you can utilize great design instead? That was the thinking behind this Tribeca apartment renovation, spearheaded by the Brooklyn-based firm Office of Architecture. Walls were taken down to make space for walnut cabinetry, sliding doors, and industrial steel columns. The idea was to open up the living areas and bring in as much natural light as possible–and the resulting 3,000-square-foot apartment is quite stunning and livable.

Take the grand tour

Architecture, Brooklyn, Design, navy yard, New Developments

Rendering of Admirals Row via S9 Architecture and 399 Sands Street via Dattner Architects

Once a shipyard where World War II warships were produced, the 300-acre Brooklyn Navy Yard is undergoing a major development to become a multi-use industrial and commercial mecca. Steiner Equities Group is overseeing the area’s reinvention and as YIMBY learned, the developer has filed permits for a mixed-use building at 399 Sands Street. Designed by Dattner Architects, renderings reveal a nine-story building with a concrete facade and lots of greenery on its roof, as well as new views of the site as a whole and the planned Wegmans grocery store.

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City Living, Technology, Transportation

Image via Wikimedia Commons.

If you’ve ever found yourself lost in a maze of corridors or trampled in a boarding stampede at Penn Station, help may have arrived in the form of yet another useful mobile app. Beginning this week, Amtrak will offer a free app, FindYourWay, that helps travelers–65,000 of whom pass through the station each day–find their way through the station and avoid the crush of crowds that form around electronic boards announcing train departures, the New York Times reports.

Find out more

Brooklyn, Design, Green Design, Greenpoint

the greenpoint, brooklyn, waterfront development

Rendering of The Greenpoint via +TOM

The Greenpoint, a 40-story waterfront rental and condo tower and the neighborhood’s tallest building, topped out in February, launched sales in July and now, is a few months away from getting a public 275-foot long promenade at its waterfront site. After nearly a decade of delays, the Brooklyn walkway, the first of its kind to be privately built in Greenpoint, will open in the spring. According to the Wall Street Journal, the park will total 29,500 square feet, including a 4,000-square-foot playground with lots of trees and colorful oval panels above.

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Architecture, Design, Landmarks Preservation Commission, New Developments, South Street Seaport

Between the controversial–and eventually nixed–condo tower and the news of ESPN’s new studio plans, it’s hard to keep up with what’s taking shape at Pier 17 in the Seaport district. The latest arrival comes from above: Developers Howard Hughes Corporation announced plans earlier this year for a “crown jewel” for the new pier, a rooftop stage and installation with a see-through canopy that will maintain sightlines of Lower Manhattan. The high-tech topper was designed by German architect Achim Menges, known for ethereal, high-concept structures made with 3-D printers or woven from carbon fibers. Set for a summer 2018 opening, the new performance space will occupy 60,000 square feet according to Downtown Express. The project on Tuesday was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, who said it will “set a standard for all future temporary seasonal structures.”

Renderings of the high-tech sky canopy this way

Design, Hudson Square, Major Developments, Manhattan, New Developments

cookfox, 550 washington street, hudson square

COOKFOX Architects released new renderings this week of its five proposed high-rise buildings in Hudson Square, part of the redevelopment of St. John’s Terminal into a nearly two-million-square-foot complex of housing, retail and office space. As CityRealty learned, the design calls for an industrial-meets-earthy design with deftly sculpted towers detailed with geometric setbacks and planted terraces. Located near Pier 40, the proposed buildings will hold a total of 1,586 apartments, with 30 percent of them below market rate, office spaces, a hotel and about 400,000 square feet of retail.

Find out more

Featured Story

Features, Green Design, photography, Sunset Park, The urban lens

Sims Municipal Recycling Facility, Sunset Park, recycling plants, NYC recycling

All photographs © James and Karla Murray for 6sqft

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, we take a look at the inner workings of Sunset Park’s Sims Municipal Recycling Facility, from trash heaps to machinery to a learning center. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

The beauty of trash is not often lauded, but out on the Brooklyn waterfront, at Sunset Park’s Sims Municipal Recycling Facility, the process is oddly mesmerizing. En masse, the glass and plastic shards processed in the building’s bowels become a disposable rainbow, the sharp shapes of residential recyclables a testament to the mesmerizing aesthetic of large-scale sustainability.

Sims is located on the 11-acre 30th Street Pier, which also contains the city’s first commercial-scale wind turbine. On Sims’ second story is a recycling education center; surrounding its exterior are a number of nature-harboring reefs, moorings, and native plants; and on the roof is an observation deck. The plant sorts 800 tons of recyclables on 2.5 miles worth of conveyor belts and machines daily, the majority of NYC’s “commingled curbside material,” its site proudly purports. In total, the plant processes 200,000 tons of plastic, glass, and metal a year. Ahead, take a look at the Sims world, where trash is heaped so high it really does look like treasure if you squint.

Take a tour

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