Design

Green Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

BIG, humanhattan 205, Bjarke Ingels Group, Venice Architecture Biennale 2018

Image via BIG

In 2014 6sqft reported on the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Rebuild By Design contest to develop ways to shore up the city from future flooding. Among the short list of winners whose projects will receive funding was “The Big U” from Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), a flooding solution for Manhattan that doubles as a social environment, with over a third of the $920 million in prize money to go toward its development. Now BIG is making a bigger splash with a similar vision now on display at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, the Observer reports. Called “Humanhattan 2050,” the project, created for the Biennale, which the firm calls “an academic exploration in urban environments and resiliency” could someday represent the first effort to keep cities safe while creating a new, improved social space along the waterfront.

Take a look

Technology, Transportation

The slow death of the MetroCard begins next spring

By Michelle Colman, Thu, June 14, 2018

MTA, NYC subway, phone scanner

Photo via Phil Hollenback/Flickr

It’s the end of an era but one that might not be too sentimental. As of May 2019, the MTA is launching its new fare payment method for the 4, 5, and 6 lines and all bus routes on Staten Island, reports amNY. No more steel bars karate chopping your abdomen when you realize your MetroCard is out of credit. Starting next spring, riders can use credit cards, mobile phones, smart watches, and mobile wallets to travel… but you’ll still be able to swipe your old MetroCard until 2023. Read more

Architecture, Chelsea, Design, Events

Zaha Hadid hat

Photo by Luke Hayes

On Thursday, Friends of the High Line are hosting their “first-ever High Line Hat Party, a raucous, downtown party for the creative and bold.” What better to don for this party than a swooping, sinuous lined hat inspired by one of the most prominent High Line building’s iconic curves?

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) director Patrik Schumacher designed the gorgeous, 3D printed, 520 West 28th-inspired hat for the party’s fashion show (h/t dezeen). Just as the building’s beautiful swirls of glass are intersected with dark steel bands, this hat replicates that aesthetic.

Get the scoop

Featured Story

Architecture, Design, Features, Interviews

Aurora at 277 Fifth Avenue, courtesy of Victor Group and Lendlease

Joel Fitzpatrick is a master of many trades. He has a diverse background in theater, fashion, interior design, and dance but the one common element through everything he does is light. Fitzpatrick started as a sculptor but yearned for more collaboration and found that through lighting. In his most recent work, a dynamic, multicolored light show called “Aurora” for Rafael Viñoly’s 277 Fifth Avenue, his career has come full circle.

After feeling the cosmos pulsate with the northern lights, there was no turning back. Now Fitzpatrick dreams of building an outdoor light show to permanently shine on the Manhattan skyline. 6sqft recently talked to Fitzpatrick, who shines a light on how his past informed his present and what to expect from him in the future.  Read more

Design, Financial District, Museums

9/11 Memorial, Memorial Glade, 9/11 toxins, MOSO Studio, 9/11 post-attack victims

Sixteen years ago as of yesterday, the rescue and recovery effort for the September 11th attacks ended. It’s estimated that 400,000 people were exposed to life-threatening toxins, and since then, nearly 70,000 first responders and more than 14,000 survivors have enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Program. Yesterday, former “Daily Show” host Jon Stewart and 9/11 Memorial & Museum president Alice Greenwald revealed the official design for Memorial Glade, a monument to all those who have lost their lives or are sick due to these related illnesses. In addition to increasing awareness about the health crisis, the memorial will also “recognize the tremendous capacity of the human spirit, as exemplified during the rescue, recovery and relief efforts following the 9/11 attacks.”

Learn about the design

Featured Story

Features, Furniture, real estate trends, renting 101

Photo via Pixabay

Currently sleeping on a mattress with no box spring? Worse yet, a blow-up mattress? Is your night table a repurposed milk crate and are your bookshelves fashioned out of salvaged bricks and found lumber? Although all these features can be surprisingly charming when paired with the right accessories, there comes a time in one’s life when one wants or needs a bit more. But even if you opt to go full-on Ikea, the cost of furnishing a small one-bedroom from the ground up will likely cost well over $3,000 and that is only if you opt for a discount Bråthult over Vallentuna sofa.

For anyone faced with the challenge of furnishing an entire apartment—either for the first time or because you’re only in NYC for a limited amount of time—there is now a solution: “fast interiors.” Rather than buy, you can now rent your furniture for three months or for several years. While the rise of furniture rentals may sound unusual, in fact, it is an obvious extension of the sharing economy that has been growing, especially in highly populated urban areas, for the past decade. An underlying tenant of the sharing economy is that renting often makes more sense the owning. But does it? Ahead, we explore how and where to rent furniture and the relative short- and long-term benefits of renting over buying.

A guide to furniture rentals

Design, holidays, Starchitecture

Image via Swarovski

Swarovski has tapped architect Daniel Libeskind to redesign a new star to top the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, the first time it will be replaced in 14 years. Libeskind, who is best known for designing the master site plan for the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site, called the star “a symbol that represents our greatest ambitions for hope, unity and peace.” According to Architectural Digest, Libeskind’s geometric, angular designs made him an easy choice as the new topper’s designer.

Get the sparkling details

Architecture, Green Design, Starchitecture, Upstate

Bjarke Ingels is everywhere. Literally. Three weeks ago, we wrote about his new design for 2 Penn Plaza. Two weeks ago, we wrote about his amazing XI sales gallery experience with the stage designer Es Devlin. Last week, it was his new role as Chief Architect at WeWork. And now, BIG has just announced Bjarke built an off-the-grid triangular tiny house in the Catskills with designer and interior architect Soren Rose. (Does this rockstarchitect ever sleep?) Bjarke Ingels Group shared with 6sqft this exclusive set of photos of the mini modern abode, which blends the A-frame architecture of the upstate area with a Nordic aesthetic.

Lots more details and renderings ahead

Architecture, Design, Interiors, New Jersey

Fogarty Finger, Paulus Hook, propeller pattern factory Jersey City

In a stunning renovation, architecture firm Fogarty Finger Architects transformed this Jersey City home, a former 1800s propeller pattern factory in the Paulus Hook neighborhood, into a luxurious single-family residence (h/t Dezeen). The original building was a workshop for Alexander Thomson & Sons Pattern Makers, a company that cast wooden forms into metal for propellers. The firm preserved the historic building shell, added a second floor, and excavated the cellar, increasing the living space from the original 3,500 square feet to 8,500 and incorporating unique outdoor space at each level.

Take the tour

Design, Financial District, Policy

In an effort to enhance the accessibility and the appearance of the New York Stock Exchange district, a new proposal is calling for curbless streets, enhanced lighting, multi-functional seating and simplified security structures. The Alliance for Downtown New York released on Monday a study that details ways to improve the historic area to make it more appealing and easier to navigate. While the corner of Wall and Broad Street has witnessed more than 400 years of Lower Manhattan history, starting when Dutch settlers built a wall as the city’s northern border, the area is not living up to its potential as one of New York City’s crown jewels, according to Jessica Lappin, the president of the Alliance.

The study is the result of a nine-month process, with the Alliance working in tandem with local stakeholders, community members and design partners, WXY Architecture + Urban Design. “This report lays out a roadmap,” Lappin said in a press release. “It is a grand yet achievable vision that could turn the Stock Exchange District into the jewel it should be.” The group estimates the overhaul project will cost roughly $30 million.

See the proposal

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.