Architecture

Architecture, Bushwick, Design

Denizen, Bushwick, 123 Melrose

A new rental development designed by ODA Architecture has been dubbed by its developers as a building “made for Bushwick.” And once you tour the sprawling, two-block site, that bold declaration makes more sense. Located on part of the former site of Brooklyn’s Rheingold Brewery at 54 Noll Street (with its still-under-construction sister site at 123 Melrose Street), the Denizen Bushwick features a fragmented facade with rust-colored, deeply-recessed windows. But what stands out the most at the building, in addition to its bisecting green promenade and interconnected courtyards, remain the corridors of large-scale art that stand seven stories tall.

Take the tour

Architecture, New Developments, Sunset Park

Development is certainly heating up around Sunset Park’s open railway tracks. Just last week, a one-million-square-foot mixed-use development at 8th Avenue and 63rd Street started making its way through the City’s approval process, and now, just around the corner, an equally massive mega-development has been proposed. First spotted by Yimby, the idea from DXA Studio would encompass two blocks along 62nd Street, from 5th to 7th Avenues. Three 18-story towers would incorporate retail, condos, office space, restaurants, a hotel, gym with a pool, community facilities, and public park space.

More details and renderings this way

Architecture, condos, East Village, Landmarks Preservation Commission

119-121 Second Avenue, East Village, LPC

Courtesy of Morris Adjmi Architects

The Landmarks Preservation Commission approved on Tuesday a seven-story condo on the site of the 2015 East Village gas explosion. Designed by Morris Adjmi Architects, the project was first presented to the commission in July but was sent back to the drawing board over concerns regarding the windows and gloomy coloring. According to Curbed NY, the firm’s new design features a brighter facade, more traditional windows to reflect the character of the East Village and a permanent plaque to honor the two people that died during the explosion.

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Architecture, Financial District, Starchitecture

130 William Street, David Adjaye, Adjaye Associates, Lightstone Group, Financial District condos

Sales launched this week for 130 William, starchitect David Adjaye’s first skyscraper in New York City. Available residences at the Financial District tower include studio, one-, two-, three- and four-bedroom condos, as well as and loggia/penthouse units. The apartments just listed range in price from $780,990 to just over $6.96 million. According to Lightstone, there’s been enormous interest in the building: over 30 contracts have been signed in under 30 days, over a year before 130 William is set to open in 2020.

See the floorplans

Architecture, Battery Park City, Design

west thames bridge, wxy, nyc bridge

Rendering via WXY Architecture

After two Battery Park City bridges were destroyed during the terrorist attacks on 9/11, the city quickly built the Rector Street Bridge, a temporary solution to let pedestrians safely cross West Street. The state’s department of transportation released a proposal in 2006 to reconstruct the promenade but opted to renovate the bridge in 2009 instead. WXY Architecture released a new proposal in 2013 to replace the Rector Street Bridge with a 230-foot-long light-filled, permanent pedestrian walkway at West Thames Street. But, as Crain’s first reported, the project won’t meet its fall deadline and the project’s budget has grown from $20 million to roughly $40 million.   Find out more

History, infographic, Landscape Architecture

Early designs for Central Park. Image courtesy of the National Park Service, Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site.

When thinking of influential creators of New York City’s most memorable places, it’s hard not to imagine Frederick Law Olmsted near the top of the list. Considered to be the founder of landscape architecture–he was also a writer and conservationist–Olmsted was committed to the restorative effects of natural spaces in the city. Perhaps best known for the wild beauty of Central and Prospect Parks, his vast influence includes scores of projects such as the Biltmore estate, the U.S. Capitol grounds and the Chicago World’s Fair. In preparation for the bicentennial of Olmsted’s 1822 birth, the Library of Congress has made 24,000 documents providing details of Olmsted’s life available online, Smithsonian reports. The collection includes journals, personal correspondence, project proposals and other documents that offer an intimate picture of Olmsted’s private life and work. The collection is linked to an interactive map at Olmsted Online showing all Olmsted projects in the United States (and there are many). You can search the map according to project name, location, job number and project type.

Explore the documents and map

Architecture, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Midtown

This morning the Landmarks Preservation Commission voted to designate the AT&T building at 550 Madison Avenue as an individual landmark. Designed by Philip Johnson and completed in 1984, the world’s first postmodern skyscraper originally served as the AT&T headquarters. A decade later, Sony moved in and it became known as the Sony Tower. Recently, a growing roster of preservationists and architects have been urging the LPC to landmark the building after plans surfaced showing significant changes to its architecture.

So what happens now?

Featured Story

Architecture, Bronx, Features, History, immigration, mott haven

When the Piccirilli Brothers arrived in New York from Italy in 1888, they brought with them a skill– artistry and passion for stone-carving unrivaled in the United States. At their studio at 467 East 142nd Street, in the Mott Haven Section of the Bronx, the brothers turned monumental slabs of marble into some of the nation’s recognizable icons, including the senate pediment of the US Capitol Building and the statue of Abraham Lincoln that sits resolutely in the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall.

The Piccirillis not only helped set our national narrative in stone but they also left an indelible mark on New York City. They carved hundreds of commissions around the five boroughs, including the 11 figures in the pediment of the New York Stock exchange, the “four continents” adorning the Customs House at Bowling Green, the two stately lions that guard the New York Public Library, both statues of George Washington for the Arch at Washington Square, and upwards of 500 individual carvings at Riverside Church.

Chisel away at this tale

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, immigration

Roger Horne, a Mohawk Ironworker in the Raising Gang, ca. 1970 via the Smithsonian

The Empire State Building. The George Washington Bridge. The United Nations. The Woolworth Building. 30 Rock. The Seagram Building. Lincoln Center. The Waldorf Astoria. Virtually all of New York’s most iconic structures were raised in part by Mohawk Native American ironworkers. Since 1916, when Mohawk men made their way to New York to work on the Hell Gate Bridge, ironworkers from two Native communities, Akwesasne (which straddles Ontario, Quebec, and New York State) and Kahnawake (near Montreal), have been “walking iron” across the city.

Get the rest of this stories-high story

Architecture, condos, Greenwich Village, Meatpacking District, New Developments

101 West 14th Street, ODA, Meatpacking District

Rendering by ODA Architecture

First renderings of ODA Architecture’s 13-story tower planned for Greenwich Village reveal a Tetris-inspired, boxy design, YIMBY reported on Wednesday. Much like the firm’s other projects, the facade of the building, located at 101 West 14th Street, will look like a series of sculpted, stacked boxes. Developer Gemini Rosemont has filed permits to convert the site which currently holds a former bank into condos with ground floor retail. There will be 45 condos total, with 21 of them duplexes.

See the design

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