Architecture

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Architecture, condos, Features, Interviews, New Developments, Upper West Side 

Images courtesy of CetraRuddy

Designed by CetraRuddy and RKTB Architects, Dahlia at 212 West 95th Street celebrates the Upper West Side‘s classic residential blocks of pre-war architecture while adding innovative design elements. The condo’s 38 homes and common areas are designed to be more spacious than the average Manhattan apartment, and perks unheard of in New York City include a huge 5,100-square-foot private elevated park, a fitness center with a yoga room, and a private parking garage. Plus, each apartment is situated on a corner of the building, so there’s no shortage of views and natural light. 6sqft recently offered a peek at the 20-story building’s interiors, and we’ve now chatted with architect John Cetra about this new addition to the Upper West Side, the neighborhood, and how apartment building design must be sensitive to changing times and the idea of home in the city.

An interview with John Cetra of CetraRuddy, this way

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Architecture, Chelsea, condos, Features, Major Developments, New Developments, Rentals, Starchitecture

The 14 best apartments near the High Line

By Emily Nonko, Thu, July 9, 2020

In the decade since the High Line opening, the surrounding area of West Chelsea has exploded into one of Manhattan’s most desirable areas for developers building luxury real estate. (It didn’t hurt that the opening of the now-famous elevated park coincided with a neighborhood rezoning.) These days, any walk along the park reveals a variety of development in different stages of construction right alongside buildings that have welcomed new, typically wealthy residents over the past several years. 6sqft has rounded up the 14 defining buildings now open around the High Line. There are the early trailblazers, like the energy-efficient condo HL23, as well as the starchitect standouts, like Zaha Hadid’s 520 West 28th, and of course, the new kids on the block, including Bjarke Ingels’ twisting towers The XI and Thomas Heatherwick’s bubbled Lantern House condo.

See the full list here

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Architecture, Features, Financial District, History

Woolworth Building, historic photos of the Woolworth Building, NYC then and now photos, historic NYC photos

The Woolworth Building, then and now. L: Image courtesy of Library of Congress via Wiki cc; r: Image Norbert Nagel via Wiki cc.

When the neo-Gothic Woolworth Building at 233 Broadway was erected in 1913 as the world’s tallest building, it cost a total of $13.5 million to construct. Though many have surpassed it in height, the instantly-recognizable Lower Manhattan landmark has remained one of the world’s most iconic buildings, admired for its terra cotta facade and detailed ornamentation–and its representation of the ambitious era in which it arose. Developer and five-and-dime store entrepreneur Frank Winfield Woolworth dreamed of an unforgettable skyscraper; the building’s architect, Cass Gilbert, designed and delivered just that, even as Woolworth’s vision grew progressively loftier. The Woolworth Building has remained an anchor of New York City life with its storied past and still-impressive 792-foot height.

Find the city’s history in the Woolworth Building

Architecture, condos, Interiors, Upper West Side 

As the construction of new condo tower Dahlia wraps up on the Upper West Side, we’re taking a look at the 20-story building’s impressive amenity package. Designed by CetraRuddy and RKTB Architects, the building at 212 West 95th Street manages to mix the pre-war aesthetic of its neighbors with modern design elements. In addition to its sleek look, Dahlia also offers perks unheard of in New York City, including a huge 5,100-square-foot private elevated park with recreation space for both adults and kids and private parking garage.

See inside

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Architecture, Features, Interviews, Landscape Architecture, Lower East Side

Rendering courtesy of Extell

The coronavirus pandemic–which forced New Yorkers to shelter in place and adhere to social distancing rules–has many apartment dwellers longing for private outdoor space. While a lot of us would be content with a balcony or rooftop access, Extell, the developer behind One Manhattan Square, has taken the idea of residential outdoor space to the next level. At the Lower East Side condo tower, residents have access to 45,000 square feet of green space designed by landscape architecture firm West 8. Considered to be one of the largest private gardens in the city, the East River-facing green space is uniquely located on an incline and contains several distinct areas designed for active and passive use. Ahead, hear from the team at West 8 on creating an urban oasis in one of the city’s busiest neighborhoods as well as the many perks of the space, including an adult treehouse, tea pavilion, star-gazing observatory, and more.

Hear from the architects

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Architecture, condos, Features, Interviews, New Developments, Nomad

Renderings by The Neighbourhood, courtesy of Morris Adjmi Architects

Among the recent architectural contributions to New York City designed by Morris Adjmi Architects, a tall, slender tower at 30 East 31st Street from developers EDG and The Pinnacle Group is quietly turning heads in the northern part of the Manhattan neighborhood known as Nomad. The 479-foot-high, 42-unit condominium tower, officially named 30E31, is now ready for occupancy. 6sqft caught up with architect and designer Morris Adjmi to get the creator’s viewpoint on the notable new Manhattan residence, from his thoughts on the relatively new neighborhood to his contextual exterior design and custom interiors.

The full interview with Morris Adjmi, this way

Architecture, condos, Interiors, New Developments, Nomad

30 East 31st Street, 30E31, Morris Adjmi, Nomad

Renderings by The Neighbourhood, courtesy of Morris Adjmi Architects

As the architecturally stunning residential tower at 30 East 31st Street nears completion, we’re getting a look inside the 479-foot-tall skyscraper. Designed by Morris Adjmi Architects, the high-rise mixes Neo-Gothic and Art Deco styles present in the historic Nomad neighborhood to create one of the most distinctive new buildings in the city. The sleek design continues to the interiors of 30 E 31, where its 42 apartments boast custom woodwork and floor-to-ceiling windows.

See inside

Architecture, Cool Listings, Upstate

The only private residence designed by Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei is available to rent this summer for $125,000. Located in the quiet upstate town of Ancram, the three-bedroom home is described as “liveable art” in the listing, which was first spotted by the New York Post. The modern home, designed in collaboration between the artist and Swiss firm HHF Architects, is also for sale for $5.25 million.

More here

Architecture, Landmarks Preservation Commission

Proposed east-west view; Rendering by Gensler/ RFR Realty, courtesy of Landmarks Preservation Commission

An observation deck will return to the Chrysler Building. During a Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing on Tuesday, Aby Rosen’s RFR Realty, which bought the Art Deco landmark last year for $151 million, presented its proposal to revamp the skyscraper’s 61st and 62nd floors to allow for public access. The Chrysler Building previously housed an observatory, which opened on the 71st floor in 1945 as the Celestial.

Details this way

Architecture, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Museums, Tribeca

Rendering of proposed exhibition space by Culturespaces/ Woods Bagot, courtesy of LPC

An art center with immersive art exhibitions has been proposed for a landmarked former banking hall in Lower Manhattan. Culturespaces, a French museum operator, presented its plan to adapt the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank into a center of digital art to the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday. The design proposal from Woods Bagot Architects includes alterations to the landmarked interior to accommodate a ticketing area and necessary audiovisual equipment for the art center, as well as modifications to the exterior of the building.

More here

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