Architecture

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Architecture, building of the year, Features, Long Island City, New Developments, Top Stories

Announcing 6sqft’s 2018 Building of the Year!

By Dana Schulz, Thu, December 13, 2018

Rendering via Hill West Architects; frame via Pixabay

The votes have been tallied, and it’s time to name the 2018 Building of the Year! The winning title belongs to none other than Long Island City’s Skyline Tower. The 778-foot-tall tower beat out 11 other significant NYC buildings in a competitive two-week competition held by 6sqft. Out of nearly 3,000 votes cast, the Hill West-designed structure took first place with a whopping 1,021 votes or 35.5% of the total. Was it the fact that the Skyline Tower is on course to become the borough’s tallest building? Or that it has an estimated $1.088 billion sellout, the first in the borough to break the one billion mark? Or perhaps it’s the LIC location, the forthcoming home to 25,000 Amazon employees?

More on this year’s winner!

Museums, New Developments, Starchitecture, Upper West Side 

American Museum of Natural History, Jeanne Gang, Studio Gang, Richard Gilder Center for Science Education and Innovation

Rendering via Studio Gang

In October, plans by Studio Gang to expand the American Museum of Natural History and create the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation were stopped in their tracks after New York State Supreme Court Justice Lynn Kotler issued a temporary restraining order. A lawsuit had been filed by a community group opposed to the expansion on the grounds that it would destroy public parkland and threaten the surrounding environment. Judge Kotler on Monday ruled in favor of the museum in a decision confirming that all appropriate procedures in preparation for the project were followed. The decision will allow the museum to proceed with the $383 million expansion project.

Find out more

Art, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District, More Top Stories

The Plinth, The Spur, High Line, james corner field operations, diller scofidio + renfro, simone leigh

Image by James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, courtesy of the City of New York.

The Spur, the last section of the High Line, extending east along 30th Street and ending above 10th Avenue, is scheduled to open in 2019. Unlike other sections of the park which are more linear and perfect for strolling, this section will feature a large-scale plaza for public programming and art and areas for seating and gathering. Anchoring the new section will be the High Line Plinth. As Designboom reports, the Plinth will be one of the only sites in New York City with the purpose of featuring a rotating series of new contemporary public art commissions.

Renderings of the Plinth, this way

Architecture, Flushing

Designed by Philip Johnson for the 1964-65 World’s Fair to embody the architectural essence of Space Age futurism, the New York State Pavilion has been battered by the ensuing decades to the point of becoming valued as an “historic ruin.” As 6sqft previously reported, plans to restore the site have been progressing slowly even with new funding from the city. Now, Curbed reports, the iconic site in Flushing, Queens, will be getting a $16.5 million grant from FEMA for Hurricane Sandy-related repairs.

Find out more

Architecture, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Midtown, Starchitecture

550 Madison, snohetta, olayan group, Philip johnson

Architecture firm Snøhetta unveiled this week a preservationist-friendly revision to a controversial design for an updated AT&T building at 550 Madison Avenue. The latest design is one of several revisions, each followed by controversy over being seen by preservationists as diverting too much from the building’s original design by Philip Johnson and John Burgee. In addition to comparisons to the original, new designs have had to consider the subsequent revamp that made it the Sony building in 1994, which replaced the building’s open Madison Avenue arcade with “Sony Experience” storefronts and covered a rear public arcade with a glass roof.

‘Hands off my Johnson’

Architecture, Getting Away, Green Design

Photos by Albert Vecerka/Esto for WXY

Aimed at bringing new visitors to the state’s parks, the NY Parks 2020 initiative funded a $9 million project that created the first vacation cabins and cottages to offer accommodations in Long Island’s Wildwood and Heckscher State Parks. The architecture firm WXY, headed by Claire Weisz, was chosen to design the new cabins. The first of these, 10 cabins ranging in size from 670 to 784 square feet, became available to rent on Memorial Day weekend. They represent an unusual attempt to introduce modern creative design where we traditionally find rudimentary and rustic construction while providing high quality, affordable accommodations for park visitors.

Take a look inside

Architecture, Meatpacking District, New Developments, Starchitecture

In August, four months after topping outJeanne Gang’s High Line-adjacent tower at 40 Tenth Avenue had its geometric glass installed. Images released by Studio Gang showed the 10-story office building taking shape and showed off its unique glazing system on the lower levels. Now, Aurora Capital Associates and William Gottlieb Real Estate, the project’s developers, are offering new renderings of the building itself and its future office spaces for a new view of the “solar carve” that the building has been known for (h/t Curbed).

More new angles, this way

Design, Midtown, Starchitecture

As 6sqft reported earlier this month, Bjarke Ingels’ restoration of the landmarked Lord & Taylor building won’t alter the design of the original structure all that much. But one major update the Bjarke Ingels Group will bring to the 104-year Fifth Avenue department store includes a new roof terrace with multi-use areas and a glassy courtyard. The firm’s proposal, set to be presented to the Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday, reveals a new rendering of the rooftop as well as plans to change the iconic store’s signage.

Design updates here

Featured Story

Architecture, Behind the Scenes, Features, Financial District, History

Hardhats aren’t your typical church-going attire, but they were necessary at Trinity Church when Vicar Rev. Philip Jackson led a behind-the-scenes tour of Trinity’s ongoing $112,000,000, two-year restoration. The project, officially known as a “rejuvenation” of the facilities, began on May 7, 2018, and is slated to be finished in the spring of 2020. Now six months underway, the meticulous work, headed by architect Jeff Murphy of Murphy Burnham and Buttrick, will preserve Trinity’s landmarked church building while “enhancing the overall worship experience,” by making the church more accessible and welcoming.

Weaving our way between scaffolding and rubble in one of New York’s most iconic naves, we saw the very foundation of Trinity Church’s past and got a glimpse of its future. From the finer points of organ-voicing to some of the first examples of American stained-glass, check out 10 of the most exciting behind-the-scenes secrets of the Trinity Church Restoration.

Check out the Church!

Design, holidays, Starchitecture

Image: Diane Bondareff/AP Images for Tishman Speyer via TimeOut

The star that tops the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree each year never fails to dazzle; this year is no exception. The 12-ton Norway Spruce has been crowned by architect Daniel Libeskind‘s creation consisting of 3 million Swarovski crystals and weighing in at 900 pounds. The World Trade Center master site planner, known for his geometric, angular designs, called the star “a symbol that represents our greatest ambitions for hope, unity and peace.” And we can all use plenty of that.

106,400 lumens of white light, this way

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