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affordable housing, gentrification, Harlem

Rendering courtesy of SHoP Architects

A proposal to bring two new residential towers with hundreds of affordable housing units to a largely vacant lot in Harlem was scrapped by developers this week. Late on Monday, the developer withdrew the project, known as One45, a few hours before it was set to be voted on by a City Council committee, as Patch first reported. The plan involved two mixed-use towers on the corner of West 145th Street and Lenox Avenue with a total of 915 apartments. The proposal faced fierce opposition from local Council Member Kristin Richardson Jordan, who argued that the new development would displace Harlem’s Black residents and contribute to gentrification. Without the zoning changes needed to build One45, the developers could construct a condo building with no affordable housing, a self-storage facility, and a community facility.

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Celebrities, Harlem, Recent Sales

All photos courtesy of Will Ellis / DDreps

Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka found a buyer this month for their five-story Harlem townhouse, which first hit the market last August for $7,325,000. As first reported by the New York Post, the home at 2036 Fifth Avenue is in contract for more than $7,100,000, likely setting a new record for a townhouse sale in the Upper Manhattan neighborhood. The home, constructed in 1908 as a bed-and-breakfast, measures 8,000 square feet and 20 feet wide.

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Featured Story

Art, Features, Harlem, Manhattan, NYC Guides

Located at the northern end of Manhattan, Harlem has long been an important hub of culture and creativity. From the Harlem Renaissance to today, the area holds a critical place as a historic center of African American culture. It has been home to famous residents such as Zora Neale Hudson and Langston Hughes, brought together iconic artists including Josephine Baker and Duke Ellington, and remains at the heart of New York’s artistic community. Though Harlem has changed as gentrification creeps north, there are still many cultural anchors that retain the historic soul of the neighborhood. From dance and jazz to museums large and small, here is an art lover’s guide to Harlem.

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Architecture, Events, Harlem, History, Manhattan

Courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

For the first time since 2019, Jane’s Walk NYC will offer in-person tours next month. Presented by the Municipal Art Society of New York, Jane’s Walk is a three-day festival of free guided walking tours through iconic New York City neighborhoods. This year, the volunteer-led event, which runs May 6-8, includes walks through four historic districts in Harlem: the Mount Morris Park Historic District, the Central Harlem Historic District, Striver’s Row, and the Dorrance Brooks Historic District, designated by the Landmarks Preservation Commission last June.

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Harlem, Manhattan, New Developments

Renderings courtesy of Janus Property Group unless otherwise noted

A state-of-the-art building built for life science, academic, and creative tenants is officially complete in Harlem, serving as the anchor of a major new commercial district in the neighborhood. The 350,000-square-foot Taystee Lab Building, named after the bread bakery that once occupied the lot, is the largest building in the Manhattanville Factory District, a master-planned, multi-building campus stretching from West 125th Street to West 128th Street with dedicated commercial and community space.

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Cool Listings, Harlem

Images courtesy of Douglas Elliman

This five-story Georgian-style townhouse at 2362 Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard was built in 1896 and has only been home to two owners since that time. Its original owner was among the first African-American dentists living and practicing on Strivers’ Row. The single-family townhouse may be only just over 15 feet wide, but a wealth of history and intact original details make it a gracious home. Asking $2,495,000, the 4,112 square-foot 14-room home contains seven bedrooms and nine fireplaces.

Tour the historic uptown townhouse

affordable housing, Harlem, housing lotteries

Image courtesy of NYC Department of Housing Preservation & Development

At 27 stories and 340 feet high, the new Victoria Towers redevelopment at 230 West 126th Street in central Harlem–the site of the former Victoria Theater–has the distinction of being the neighborhood’s tallest building. Leasing opened in July, and now 102 of its units are available for those earning 50, 60 or 130 percent of the area median income and range from studios at $755 /month to $3043/month two-bedrooms (market-rate studios start at $2,238/month). Designed by Aufgang Architects, the mixed-use building complex is also home to a Renaissance Marriott hotel and a cultural arts center.

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Cool Listings, Harlem

Listing photos by Carol McGuinness and Daniel Wang

This gorgeous Neo-Grec home in Harlem’s coveted Mount Morris Park Historic District is perfectly preserved on the exterior, and the interiors, though they’ve been somewhat updated, retain much of their old-world charm. Located at 102 West 123rd Street and on the market for $4,295,000, the home is composed of an owner’s triplex plus ground-floor apartment. Throughout, you’ll find loads of original paneling, moldings, and stained glass transoms along with stylish but period-appropriate upgrades.

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Cool Listings, Harlem

Listing photos by MW Studio for Sotheby’s International Realty

Located at 11 West 121st Street in the Mount Morris Park Historic District, one of the most beautiful and grand parts of Harlem, this seven-bedroom townhouse has just hit the market for $5.2 million. In addition to its prime location just off Marcus Garvey Park, the 1889 brownstone is chock full of ornate, original woodwork that’s been preserved during a renovation by “by two of Harlem’s most celebrated artists,” according to the listing.

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Celebrities, Cool Listings, Harlem

All photos courtesy of Will Ellis / DDreps

Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka are selling their five-story townhouse in Harlem for $7,325,000. The couple paid $4,000,000 in 2013 for the 19th-century home at 2036 Fifth Avenue, which was renovated by interior designer Trace Lehnhoff in collaboration with architecture firm Povero & Company. Designed for entertaining, the five-bedroom townhouse has a theater, music room, wine cellar, a rear garden, third-floor deck with an outdoor jacuzzi, and an irrigated rooftop.

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