The Spiral

hudson yards, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

Developer Tishman Speyer has officially filed plans with the Department of Buildings for Bjarke Ingels‘ Hudson Yards tower The Spiral at 509 West 34th Street. As reported by The Real Deal, the filing confirms that the office tower will rise 65 stories and 1,005 feet and encompass 2.2 million square feet. When renderings were first released of the $3.2 billion project, which is distinguished by cascading landscaped terraces and hanging gardens, Ingels said his design “combines the classic ziggurat silhouette of the premodern skyscraper with the slender proportions and efficient layouts of the modern high-rise.”

More details ahead

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Carter Uncut, Construction Update, Features, hudson yards, Major Developments, Midtown West, Starchitecture, Urban Design

hudson yards skyline

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s breaking development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. This week Carter brings us the third installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter zooms in on Hudson Yards.

The Hudson Yards neighborhood in Far Midtown West is one of the country’s most active construction areas. Construction cranes dot its emerging skyline and dozens more are promised now with the district’s improved connection to the rest of the city. Last fall, the 7-line subway station at Eleventh Avenue and 34th Street opened with one-stop access to Times Square. The newly-minted station features a lengthy diagonal escalator bringing commuters to the front-door of the huge mixed-use project being created over the rail yards west of Tenth Avenue between 30th and 33rd streets. Originally, a second station was contemplated on 41st Street and Tenth Avenue but transit officials claimed it could not afford the $500 million expenditure, despite the enormous amount of new residential construction occurring along the far West 42nd Street corridor.

Nevertheless, the finished Hudson Yards station deposits straphangers into a new diagonal boulevard and park between 10th and 11th Avenues that will ultimately stretch from the Related Companies / Oxford Property Group’s Hudson Yards master plan northward to 42nd Street.

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Architecture, Midtown West, New Developments, Polls, Starchitecture

On Monday, 6sqft brought you the latest reveal from starchitect Bjarke Ingels, a cascading supertall tower set for Hudson Yards and known as the Spiral. It caught people’s attention not only for the architect attached to it, but for its series of landscaped terraces and hanging gardens that twist around its glassy facade. The interior views are just as flashy, with office workers mingling around the indoor/outdoor atria and the sunlight pouring in through the massive windows.

Some have pointed out, though, that this all looks a little familiar. Bjarke employed a similar scheme for 2 World Trade Center, where a stepped facade creates a series of terraces that blur the lines between interior and exterior. And both his newly revealed High Line towers and VIA 57 West tetrahedron boast angled facades and tout their incorporations of courtyards. But is this a bad thing — that an architect has a distinct style? Let us know your feelings on the Spiral.

Architecture, hudson yards, Midtown West, New Developments, Starchitecture

It seems safe to say at this point that two of starchitect Bjarke Ingels‘ favorite architectural elements are stepped facades and integrated natural spaces. His latest creation, an office tower appropriately dubbed the Spiral, incorporates both of these features, with a “cascading series of landscaped terraces and hanging gardens as its signature element,” according to a press release sent out today.

The 1,005-foot-tall, 65-story tower will rise at 66 Hudson Boulevard, at the intersection of the High Line and Hudson Yards, occupying the full block bound by West 34th Street, West 35th Street, 10th Avenue, and the four-acre Hudson Boulevard Park (BIG is also designing a pair of towers at the southern end of the High Line). Ingels said his conceptual design “combines the classic ziggurat silhouette of the premodern skyscraper with the slender proportions and efficient layouts of the modern high-rise.”

Check out more views of the Spiral

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