Long Island City

Architecture, Long Island City, New Developments

the jacx, tishman speyer, gotham center

Long Island City, New York City’s fastest growing neighborhood, shows no signs of slowing down. Following the completion of Jackson Park, the residential phase of Tishman Speyer Properties’ massive Gotham Center development, renderings have been revealed for their creative office space across the street at 28-01 Jackson Avenue. As CityRealty learned, the development, called the JACX, consists of two identical towers that will include over 40,000 square feet of retail space, with a gourmet market, food hall, dining, and boutique fitness centers, as well as a one-acre rooftop terrace.

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Featured Story

Art, Art nerd ny, Events, Features

Art Nerd founder Lori Zimmer shares her top art, design and architecture event picks for 6sqft readers!

There’s nothing better than walking around the city when the weather is great, and this week’s round up will get you outdoors and enjoying the sun. Open studios abound on Saturday and Sunday, offering art lovers a chance to peek into the private studios of artists across the boroughs. The city’s sacred sites—churches, synagogues and temples—are also swinging their doors open, inviting the public to bask in the beauty of their stained glass collections.

Details on these events and more this way

Featured Story

Architecture, Carter Uncut, Features, Long Island City, Queens, Urban Design

Carter Uncut brings New York City’s latest development news under the critical eye of resident architecture critic Carter B. Horsley. Here, Carter brings us his sixth installment of “Skyline Wars,” a series that examines the explosive and unprecedented supertall phenomenon that is transforming the city’s silhouette. In this post Carter looks at the new towers defining the Queens skyline.

For a long time, the glass tower erected by Citibank was the lone skyscraper of note in Queens. Known initially as Citicorp at Court Square, it was built in 1989 and designed by Raul de Armas of SOM as a blue-green metal-panel-and-glass office tower with just a few setbacks at its 633-foot-high top—an extremely clean-cut, modern obelisk of fine proportions.

In a 1988 article in The New York Times, Anthony DePalma wrote that the tower “dominates the Queens skyline like a sequoia in the desert” and Paul Goldberger, then the newspaper’s architecture critic, wrote the tower was “rapidly becoming one of the most conspicuous structures in the entire city.” He added, “It is a very unlikely thing, this building—no other skyscraper in New York is remotely like the Citicorp tower, not so much for its design as for the fact that it stands free, alone in this landscape of gas stations, warehouses and row houses,”

The bank tower transformed “the landscape of New York” and “no longer does Manhattan virtually by itself control the skyline,” Mr. Goldberger continued. “Skyscrapers built at random all over New York would be devastating, but an occasional exclamation point, well designed and carefully placed, will do the skyline no grievous harm,” he concluded. This is a very important but also very controversial point as currently evidenced in Manhattan where traditional precincts are being pin-pricked to exhaustion and confusion by supertalls.

more on the queens skyline

Daily Link Fix

Tony Cenicola, Pajtim Osmanaj
  • Get ready to cry your eyes out. These maps show that one-bedroom rentals have gone up $200/month since just six months ago. [Brokelyn]
  • Gentrification summed up in 311 calls. [NY Mag]
  • If you’re heading upstate this weekend, be sure to hit up these eateries in the Hudson Valley and Catksills. [Brownstoner]
  • This construction worker doesn’t let his 9-5pm job get in the way of his love of creating art. [NYTimes]
  • Earlier this week, CityRealty released a report about 22,000 new apartments coming to Brooklyn. Now see what’s in store for Long Island City in Queens. [DNAinfo]

Images: Pajtim Osmanaj artwork by Tony Cenicola for The New York Times (L); Long Island City’s high-rise buildings by Nigel Chiwaya for DNAinfo (R)

Art, Green Design, Long Island City

DEFACED, 5POINTZ, cultural preservation

We were pretty bummed over the summer when we heard that Long Island City graffiti mecca 5Pointz was being torn down and replaced with condos. But now that the site has officially been razed, a group of architects are taking this crime against architecture and using it to fuel their mission of preserving the city’s unofficial artistic and cultural landmarks.

Arianna Armelli, Ishaan Kumar, David Sepulveda, and Wagdy Moussa created DEFACED as a group that “values artistic freedom and expression, protecting the cultural relics of New York City refusing to witness the complete disregard for the history of New York.” As their first order of business, they’ve created a proposal to buy back the 5Pointz site from developers and build a creative oasis that includes an urban rooftop with rainwater collection system, artist gallery, and recycling center.

More on DEFACED and its proposal

Real Estate Wire

long island city pepsi sign, long island city, pepsi sign
  • Tour the new Long Island City residential building that sits behind the Pepsi sign. [Curbed]
  • Extell is bringing a 52-story, 710,907-square-foot residential building to 41st Street and 5th Avenue. The company spent $16.46M on the development and to acquire the air rights from nearby St. Raphael’s Church. [CO]
  • Spending on NYC residential construction has jumped 50-percent, but the units yielded will be fewer than previous years. The reason? Dollars are being poured into building luxury properties designed for wealthy residents or investors. [Crain’s]
  • A profile of the six Chinese real estate titans snatching up properties in the city. [TRD]

Daily Link Fix

Images: 170 Putnam interior (left), Classes on the Cobbles (right)

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