holidays

Events, holidays, New Jersey

Photo by Jennifer Brown for Jersey City

A bigger, louder and longer Fourth of July celebration is coming to Jersey City this year. Beginning at noon on Wednesday, a 10-hour free festival will hit the Hudson River waterfront, featuring several beer gardens, food trucks, a concert headlined by Snoop Dogg and the state’s largest fireworks display. The all-day event, called 50STAR FIRESHOW, is estimated to welcome more than 200,000 people to Exchange Place.

Jersey City brought back its own fireworks event in 2014 after NYC moved its display to the East River, and the size of celebration has grown each year. “I think the Jersey City side of Hudson River is going to be the place that people want to be for the 4th of July this year. Period. Between Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, Grucci, and Snoop, we are raising the bar,” Mayor Steven Fulop said.

Get the details

Featured Story

City Living, Events, Features, holidays

Macy's 4th of July Fireworks

Spectators watching the Macy’s show in 2013 from Hoboken, via Anthony Quintano/Flickr

The nation’s largest 4th of July fireworks show is getting ready to light up the New York sky; Macy’s Fourth of July live fireworks extravaganza happens next Wednesday evening, and plans are being hatched to grab a spot at any of the city’s better viewing locations (or in front of a better TV) to watch the mesmerizing choreography of pyrotechnics that will sail skyward from seven barges along the East River. The 25-minute display, which will begin at around 9:25 p.m., will be Macy’s largest since the millennium celebration and will include over 75,000 shells. The numbers behind a show that actually impresses this seen-it-all city of nine million are as mind-boggling as you’d expect.

Check the many, many moving parts behind the pyrotechnics

City Living, Events, holidays, maps

The patriotic party-planners behind the Macy’s Fourth of July live fireworks extravaganza happening next Wednesday evening have made sure to provide their usual thorough and handy guide suggesting prime spots for experiencing the world-famous pyrotechnics show. Get the 411 on official viewing points and use the interactive neighborhood finder to make sure you’re well-situated when things go boom.

Get all the info, this way

Design, holidays, Starchitecture

Image via Swarovski

Swarovski has tapped architect Daniel Libeskind to redesign a new star to top the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, the first time it will be replaced in 14 years. Libeskind, who is best known for designing the master site plan for the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site, called the star “a symbol that represents our greatest ambitions for hope, unity and peace.” According to Architectural Digest, Libeskind’s geometric, angular designs made him an easy choice as the new topper’s designer.

Get the sparkling details

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

It’s not surprising one of the original observances of Women’s History Month got its start in New York in 1909; the first women’s rights convention in the U.S. happened upstate at Seneca Falls, the first large-scale suffrage parade ran through the city and in 1917, the state became the first on the East Coast to grant women suffrage. A century later, there are countless ways to celebrate Women’s History Month in New York City, so to narrow it down, we’ve rounded up 15 feminist-friendly bookstores, art galleries, and educational events. Whether you want to shop for girl-power-themed swag at Bulletin or enjoy a female-led mediation session at the United Nations, there’s something empowering for everyone this month.  Get the scoop

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

All of New York City’s Saint Patrick’s Day parades

By Hannah Frishberg, Mon, March 5, 2018

Photo via Richie S/Flickr

Some cities are lucky to have a single St. Patrick’s Day parade, but New York City is blessed with a whopping nine parades dedicated to the holiday. While Saint Patrick’s Day is not until March 17, three communities have already celebrated: Staten Island held its annual parade on Forest Avenue and Queens held its 43rd Saint Paddy’s parade in Rockaway, as well as its LGBT-friendly St. Pat’s For All in Woodside. No worries, though: There are still six other St. Patrick’s Day Parades coming up, including NYC’s biggest, in Manhattan.

Here’s where and when to attend the remaining five

Art, holidays

valentines day cards, paper valentines, huntington library

Fold-open Valentine card, German (1900); courtesy of The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

While a simple and perhaps less swanky gesture than diamonds and roses, a Valentine’s Day card remains one of the most popular ways to say “I love you” every February 14. This year Americans will exchange about 190 million greeting cards during the holiday, spending nearly $1 billion on them. A collection of antique paper Valentines from The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens proves this is not a 21st-century phenomenon. The museum, located in San Marino, CA, acquired a collection of about 12,300 romantic greeting cards, sentimental notes and drawings made in Europe and North America from 1684 to 1970 (h/t NY Times). A historian from New Jersey, Nancy Rosin, put together the impressive collection of cards over four decades and her family recently donated them to the museum.

More this way

Brooklyn, holidays, maps

This Valentine’s Day, leave the heart-shaped candy box at Duane Reade and enjoy locally-made chocolate instead. Explore Brooklyn released their “Brooklyn Chocolate Trail Map” this month with 12 must-eat delicious destinations in the borough. The list includes chocolatiers, factories and tasting rooms. Follow the chocolate trail and taste-test your way through Greenpoint, DUMBO, Williamsburg and Downtown Brooklyn. What could be sweeter?

Learn more

Featured Story

Events, Features, holidays

Whether you’re loved up or flying solo, Valentine’s Day brings a bevy of creative events and exhibitions to New York, with a soiree for every taste. Architecture buffs can spend an exclusive evening at One Barclay with the Art Deco Society; art lovers can go back in time with jazz master Michael Arenella at the art-filled Norwood Club; and urban explorers can tour the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant’s digester eggs.

Details on these events and more this way

History, holidays, Video

A crowd in Times Square; screenshot via TheLazyCowOnUTube

In 1904, the New York Times moved from the City Hall are to the triangular piece of land at the intersection of 7th Avenue, Broadway, and 42nd Street. People thought they were crazy for moving so far uptown, but this was the same year the first subway line opened, passing through what was then called Longacre Square. Not only did their new Times Tower have a printing press in the basement (they loaded the daily papers right onto the train and got the news out faster than other papers), but it was the second-tallest building in the city at the time. To honor this accolade, the company wanted to take over the city’s former New Year’s Eve celebration at Trinity Church, and since the church elders hated people getting drunk on their property, they gladly obliged. So to ring in 1905, the Times hosted an all-day bash of 200,000 people that culminated in a midnight fireworks display, and thus the first New Year’s Eve in Times Square was born. But it wasn’t until a few years later that the famous ball drop became tradition.

Get the full history in this video

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS

Thank you, your sign-up request was successful!
This email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Please provide a valid email address.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.