Art, Financial District

fearless girl, charging bull

Fearless Girl and Charging Bull statues on Wall Street; via Anthony Quintano’s Flickr

The temporary bronze sculpture that has attracted millions of tourists and locals could become a permanent fixture in New York City, according to Adweek. Commissioned by State Street Global Advisors, the Fearless Girl statue was installed last March, a day before International Women’s Day, sending a message to Wall Street for the need of gender equality in the financial world. With her chin up and hands firmly on her hips, the 250-pound statue defiantly faces the iconic Charging Bull statue, which has stood in the same spot since 1989. And now the city might relocate the pair of statues from Bowling Green Park in lower Manhattan to another, more pedestrian-friendly home to ease safety concerns.

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Art, holidays

valentines day cards, paper valentines, huntington library

Fold-open Valentine card, German (1900); courtesy of The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

While a simple and perhaps less swanky gesture than diamonds and roses, a Valentine’s Day card remains one of the most popular ways to say “I love you” every February 14. This year Americans will exchange about 190 million greeting cards during the holiday, spending nearly $1 billion on them. A collection of antique paper Valentines from The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens proves this is not a 21st-century phenomenon. The museum, located in San Marino, CA, acquired a collection of about 12,300 romantic greeting cards, sentimental notes and drawings made in Europe and North America from 1684 to 1970 (h/t NY Times). A historian from New Jersey, Nancy Rosin, put together the impressive collection of cards over four decades and her family recently donated them to the museum.

More this way

Featured Story

Art, Bronx, Design, Features, mott haven, Where I Work

Sebastian Errazuriz, South Bronx design studio, Mott Haven artists

6sqft’s series “Where I Work” takes us into the studios, offices, and off-beat workspaces of New Yorkers across the city. In this installment, we’re touring the South Bronx design studio of Sebastian Errazuriz. Want to see your business featured here? Get in touch!

Sebastian Errazuriz is a Chilean-born artist, designer, and activist but over the years, he’s grown his multidisciplinary studio to incorporate everything from virtual reality to activism. But nothing he does is cookie-cutter. His cabinets undulate and mimic kaleidoscopes; his public art makes social commentary on issues from Wall Street and capitalism to Chile’s politicide; and he’s created sculptures that mix a boat with a coffin and a crystal chandelier with taxidermy birds. Sebastian likens his ability to work in these mediums separately but together to how he can speak both English and Spanish but also Spanglish. “It’s the freedom to incorporate words that do not exist in one particular language but that enrich communication with someone else that I really enjoy within the boundaries of art and design,” he explains.

Now, Sebastian is at the forefront of yet another new frontier. Though he has a 5,000-square-foot space at the uber-hip Industry City, he opened his second location last summer in Mott Haven, one of the city’s newest artist enclaves due to its affordable warehouse spaces and non-residential nature that sets it apart from the more gentrifying parts of the area. 6sqft recently paid Sebastian a visit here to learn how his firm is growing, the process behind his “functional art,” and why he moved to the South Bronx.

Tour the studio and meet Sebastian

Featured Story

Art, Features, photography

Juan Jose Egusquiza, Impossible Landscapes, NYC photography

6sqft’s series The Urban Lens invites photographers to share work exploring a theme or a place within New York City. In this installment, Juan Jose Egusquiza shares his “Impossible Landscapes” series. Are you a photographer who’d like to see your work featured on The Urban Lens? Get in touch with us at [email protected].

Juan Jose Egusquiza describes himself as a “visual storyteller, image maker, and reality bender.” In his latest photo manipulation series titled “Impossible Landscapes,” he bends the reality of New York, a city that lent itself perfectly to the project since it’s constantly changing and being reimaged. From plopping Downtown’s skyscraper in the middle of the desert to adding a rushing river through Chinatown to inverting the entire skyline, Juan has created a view of NYC that inspires endless curiosity and stories. Ahead, see all of the images and learn a bit more from Juan about his process and inspiration.

Everything, this way

Art, Long Island City, New Developments, Policy

5Pointz, graffiti museum, Long Island City developments, aerosol art

Photo via Wikimedia Commons

A federal judge in Brooklyn ruled Monday that the destruction of work by 21 graffiti artists at the Long Island City complex known as 5Pointz had enough recognized stature to warrant legal protection–to the tune of $6.7 million, the New York Times reports. The judgement was awarded following a landmark Federal District Court trial in November, when a civil jury concluded that real estate developer Jerry Wolkoff of Wolkoff Group broke the law when he whitewashed the building of its colorful murals under cover of night. As 6sqft previously reported, the iconic graffiti-covered warehouse, visible from passing trains since its beginnings in the 1990s as an artists’ studio and exhibition space, was razed to replaced by rental apartments–using the name 5Pointz as a marketing angle–by Wolkoff, who has owned the building on Jackson Avenue since the 1970s. Wolkoff, who claims he cried when the building came down, now has further reason to weep: The judge’s ruling awarded the artists the maximum possible damages.

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Architecture, Art, Design, hudson yards

the shed, hudson yard, shed opening

Rendering by NLÉ Works

About one year before opening in the spring of 2019, The Shed, the art center rising near Hudson Yards, will present a free event on an undeveloped lot at 10th Avenue and 30th Street. The multi-arts exhibit will happen between May 1st to May 13th, just one block away from the center’s future home. “We are temporarily transforming an empty lot into a flexible public space for new work, collaboration, and dialogue,” Alex Poots, CEO of The Shed said in a press release. That means a cool temporary space, designed by the architect Kunlé Adeyemi of NLÉ Works and artist Tino Sehgal, to host a variety of music, dance and performance.

Read more about the upcoming shows

Art, Green Design

Renderings courtesy of Austin+Mergold in collaboration with Maria Park, and consulting engineers Chris Earls (Cornell) and Scott Hughes (Silman)

“Oculi” is the latest winner of FIGMENT’s City of Dreams competition, an annual design contest challenging architecture and design firms to build a pavilion out of recycled materials to be assembled and displayed on Governor’s Island. Last summer, visitors to the island were graced with a pavilion made out of more than 300,000 aluminum cans (the number of cans used in NYC in an hour), melted down and cast into cracked clay. This year, the competition is highlighting metal grain bins. A design by the firm Austin+Mergold, in collaboration with Maria Park (of Cornell University) and consulting engineers Chris Earls and Scott Hughes, will reuse old metal grain bins for a pavilion that establishes a visual connection between urban and rural ways of life.

Read more on the winning proposal

Featured Story

Art, Features, People, Soho, Where I Work

David Mandel (L) and Serge Strosberg (R) in their studio, photo by James and Karla Murray

6sqft’s series “Where I Work” takes us into the studios, offices, and off-beat workspaces of New Yorkers across the city. In this installment, we’re touring artistic duo Strosberg Mandel‘s Soho studio.Want to see your business featured here? Get in touch!

Last year, Belgian-American figurative painter Serge Strosberg had an exhibit about feminism in the East Village. The show’s curator introduced him to David Mandela theatrical stylist, jewelry designer, and former drag queen. Though the two came from very different artistic backgrounds, they immediately hit it off on both a personal and professional level. Fast forward to today, and they’ve formed the NYC-based artistic duo Strosberg Mandel, creating large-scale assemblage portraits–mostly of rock n’ roll icons such as Prince, David Bowie, Elvis, and Cher–using found materials and glamorous add-ons like Swarovski diamonds and luxury fabrics.

In anticipation of their upcoming debut solo exhibition “Troubadours of Eternity” at Lichtundfire from January 24th to February 4th, in which they’ll unveil the full portrait series as “a celebration of authentic musicianship and timeless spirits,” Serge and David invited us into their Soho studio to get an advanced preview of the pieces and learn about their unique work and partnership.

Tour the studio and hear from David and Serge

Art, City Living, Design

Milton Glaser’s new subway posters, L-R “Give Help,”” To Dream Is Human,””It’s Not About Me, It’s About We.” Images © Milton Glaser for SVA.

“I Love New York” design legend Milton Glaser will debut three new works this week in places that can always use more love: New York City subway stations. The three posters, according to Glaser, are a direct counterpoint to President Trump’s attack on humanity and reflect the designer’s commitment to justice using art and design to inspire social engagement. Milton’s signs join the School of Visual Arts’ enduring “Underground Images” ad campaign which has for the past half-century featured the work of a roster of A-list current and former design faculty including Ivan Chermayeff, Edel Rodriguez, Paula Scher and Tom Geismar in NYC subways. The series has challenged millions of New Yorkers to “think big, take chances and never stop learning. ”

Find out more about the new posters and their meanings

Art, hudson yards, Major Developments

The Vessel, topped out; image courtesy of Related-Oxford

The Vessel, a 150-foot-tall climbable sculpture made of bronzed steel and concrete, topped out Wednesday, serving as the public centerpiece of Hudson Yards Public Square and Gardens. Designed by Heatherwick Studio, the $150 million interactive landmark includes 154 interconnecting flights of stairs, nearly 2,500 individual steps and 80 landings. The idea for the project stems from Related Companies’ chairman, Stephen Ross, who called it “New York’s Eiffel Tower.” The final piece of the 600-ton structure will be installed today, nearly eight months after construction began.

See it here


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