Art

Art, Events

Image via Flickr

When Yayoi Kusama last took over David Zwirner Gallery with one of her Infinity Mirror Room installations in 2017, over 75,000 people flocked to experience the awe-inspiring (and very selfie-friendly) exhibition. At times during its 80-day run, the show was so popular that visits were limited to 60 seconds and wait times reached six hours. If you weren’t one of the lucky ones then, you’ll get another chance this fall when a new exhibition dedicated to the artist’s work opens at David Zwirner on November 9, as Time Out reported.

More info

Art, Events, Williamsburg

graffiti, street art, sculpture

Photos by Nicole Mondrus for 6sqft

From June 21 to sometime in August, LA’s premier street art and graffiti exhibit will call Brooklyn home. “BEYOND THE STREETS” is a multimedia art exhibition that takes up two floors of 25 Kent Avenue in Williamsburg and is the biggest showcase of street art to date. With art by the likes of Fab 5 Freddy, The Beastie Boys, and the late Keith Haring, the exhibition celebrates the history of graffiti and street art and also examines public art as a means of protest and self-expression.

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Art, Landscape Architecture, Meatpacking District

The High Line’s final section, the Spur, is open

By Michelle Cohen, Tue, June 11, 2019

the high line, the spur, the plinth, public art, nyc parks

Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of the High Line.

The High Line’s newest section, the Spur, opened to the public last week following a ribbon-cutting celebration on Tuesday. Elected officials, artists, advocates, supporters, community members, and architects involved in the project were on hand for a speaking program that welcomed visitors to the new space. The Spur–the last section of the original elevated rail to be converted into public space–extends east along West 30th Street and ends above 10th Avenue; it’s also home to the High Line Plinth, the first site on the High Line dedicated to a rotating series of contemporary art commissions. Simone Leigh’s “Brick House” is the first Plinth commission.

Photos and more, this way

Featured Story

Art, Features, History, Interviews

Photo of Gwen and “Girl Party Wallpaper” series, courtesy of Gwen Shockey

After 49 people were killed in a mass shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando in 2016, New York City artist Gwen Shockey gathered with queer people at the Cubbyhole and Stonewall Inn to mourn. The tragedy made Gwen think about the importance of lesbian bars and safe spaces for this community. She began talking with her friends, interviewing them about coming out and navigating NYC’s queer community. This laid the groundwork for Gwen’s 2017 “Addresses” project, a digital map marking more than 200 current and former queer and lesbian bars across the five boroughs. Using information from interviews she’s conducted and from police records and newspapers, Gwen found each location and photographed what sits there now.

“It felt like a secret pilgrimage, going to each location and looking for a site that was more or less invisible to everyone else around me,” she told us. And with just three lesbian bars remaining in NYC today, the need to preserve the memories of these places seems more apparent than ever. Through her project, which is ongoing, Gwen realized that although the number of lesbian bars in the city is dropping, there are “huge shifts occurring in the queer community toward inclusion not based on identity categories but based on who needs safe space now and who needs space to dance, to express their authenticity, and to be intimate.” Gwen shared with 6sqft the process of tracking the lesbian bars of NYC’s past and lessons she’s learned about the city’s LGBTQ history along the way.

Meet Gwen

Art, Events

50 colorful public pianos pop up across NYC

By Nicole Mondrus, Thu, June 6, 2019

Photo of Sing for Hope Pianos Launch courtesy of SFH

On Monday, Sing for Hope celebrated its 500th placement of the organization’s iconic painted pianos, free for the public to play. As part of its annual event, Sing for Hope sets up pianos in public spaces across the city and invites New Yorkers to drop by for an impromptu performance. This year marks the organization’s eighth year of the piano initiative. With the placement of Sing for Hope’s 500th piano this month, NYC is now home to the most public pianos in the world. From June 4 to June 23, 50 artist-designed pianos will be found at parks and public spaces across the city.

Get the details

Featured Story

Art, Events, Features

Last year’s Pride Parade, via Wiki Commons

Fifty years have passed since the Stonewall Uprising changed New York City forever and gave the world a symbol of the struggle for LGBTQ rights and recognition. There are a seemingly endless number of ways to celebrate this milestone, learn about the history of the gay rights movement and enjoy a rainbow of diversity. Heritage of Pride, the nonprofit organization behind New York City’s official LGBTQIA+ WorldPride events, offers an interactive map to help navigate the many events planned this month. Below, you’ll find 50 ways to celebrate Pride Month.

Pride, parades and parties, this way

Art, Greenwich Village

ruth wittenberg triangle, lgbtq, gay rights, She built nyce, statues, marsha p. johnson, sylvia rivera

Wittenberg Triangle, the proposed location for the monument honoring Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. Image via Google Earth.
Days before the start of Pride Month, the city announced on Thursday that the next She Built NYC monument will honor two transgender activists, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, key leaders in the Stonewall Uprising that sparked the gay and LGBTQ rights movement in America. The monument is currently planned for Ruth Wittenberg Triangle in the heart of the Village and near other important LGBTQ neighborhood landmarks including the Stonewall Inn. The city is seeking artists interested in creating the public monuments honoring Johnson and Rivera in an open call.

Statues will honor women who changed NYC

Featured Story

Art, Bed Stuy, Features, Interiors, My SQFT House Tours

Iris Scott, Mysqft House Tours, Bed-Stuy

Our series “My sqft” checks out the homes of New Yorkers across all the boroughs. Our latest interior adventure brings us to artist Iris Scott’s Bed-Stuy loft. Want to see your home featured here? Get in touch!

Nearly ten years ago, while living in Taiwan, artist Iris Scott didn’t feel like washing her blue-stained paint brushes. Instead, she used her finger to finish the piece and, to her surprise, discovered that this childhood arts and crafts project works really well on her own oil paintings. She searched online to see if any artists out there were already dedicated to finger painting and found no one. “I was like, it’s my purpose!” she told 6sqft during a recent tour of her Bed-Stuy studio.

Iris, who grew up on a farm outside of Seattle, started posting photos and videos of her vibrant animal and nature-centric artwork on Facebook and instantly received feedback from what she calls a “virtual crit group.” She began selling her paintings online and because her Taiwan apartment was just $100 per month, was able to immediately work full time as a finger painter. Iris, credited with starting the Instinctualist movement, calls her career trajectory a “magical path.” “I’ve always wanted what I have and I’ve always felt what I have is more than I expected I could have.” Now, a decade later, Iris has her first big solo exhibition in New York City, a Ritual in Pairing, at Filo Sofi Art’s pop up space at the High Line Nine, which closes June 6. Ahead, see inside Iris’s sun-drenched corner loft in Brooklyn and learn about her 20-piece solo show, her fierce love of animals, and why she finds it flattering when children like her paintings.

Meet Iris and tour her studio

Art, Events

Buff Monster’s Lower East Side mural; Photo courtesy of NYC Pride

To celebrate WorldPride and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising next month, 50 murals will be painted on walls across New York City. As amNY first reported, the new street art is an initiative from NYC Pride for the World Mural Project. According to the organization, the murals will “reflect and honor the beauty, struggle, and strides of the LGBTQIA+ community.” The first mural designed by local artist Buff Monster was completed last week and can be viewed on the corner of Chrystie and Broome Street on the Lower East Side.

Get the details

Art, Chelsea

Robert Indiana, High Line, Paul Kasmin Gallery, 520 West 28th Street

© 2019 Morgan Art Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photography by Christopher Stach.

This past fall, the Kasmin Gallery opened a 5,000-square-foot space + rooftop sculpture garden next to Zaha Hadid’s futuristic condo 520 West 28th Street. And to kick off the summer season, the High Line-adjacent space has just announced a new sculpture garden show–a trio of works from Robert Indiana’s famous “Love” series. The pieces showcase the word in English (Love), Spanish (Amor), and Hebrew (Ahava), which, according to a press release “represent three of New York’s most historic and influential dialects, celebrating immigration and lingual diversity in one of the most visited public art spaces in the city.”

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