Architecture

Architecture, Green Design, Upstate

Gluck+, Upstate New York, glazed tower home, Tower House, unique vacation home, forest mirador

Though you may not be as limber as you once were, there’s still hope that you can climb to the top of a tree. Well, sort of. Rising above the Ulster County landscape is a uniquely glazed home that was designed as a stairway to the top of its surrounding landscape. Created by New York-based architecture firm Gluck+, the contemporary Tower House works as both a viewing platform and a functional home, sitting atop a plateau on the 19-acre property. Its unusual, cantilevered shape causes minimal impact on the ground and provides inhabitants with amazing views of virtually the entire Catskill mountain range.

Learn more about the Tower House and peek inside

Architecture, History, Midtown East

Citigroup center nyc

When it comes to skyscrapers, we put a lot of trust in architects. We have to trust that they know what they’re doing, and these seemingly impossible buildings are safe to be in and around. It’s even harder to trust what used to be known as the Citicorp or Citigroup Center, now 601 Lexington Avenue, whose bottom floors are like four stilts, holding 50 stories of building above them. It looks like a strong wind would blow the whole structure over. And when the building was constructed in 1977, before some emergency repairs, that was true.

The dangerous details after the break

Architecture, Getting Away, History

great gatsby mansions, gold coast mansions, long island mansions, leonnardo dicaprio, leonardo dicaprio great gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is an immortal novel about Long Island millionaires in the Roaring Twenties, inspired by actual parties Fitzgerald attended at the time. The Jazz Age mansions of Long Island’s “Gold Coast” certainly represent a bygone era, but you can still visit several of these Gatsby-esque architectural relics today.

Plan your architecture day trip here

Architecture, Art, Art nerd ny, Design, Events

Ewerdt Hilgemann, Park Avenue sculpture, Newwalls Newark Launch, AIA NY, Cocktails and Conversation: Alan Brake and Ken Smith, FASLA, The Architect’s Newspaper, Summer Streets, Outside Inside, Alan Ket, Tabla Rasa Gallery, Pioneer Works, Kenan Juska

Another summer weekend is upon us and we can’t wait to get out the office and into the city. This weekend Manhattan’s Summer Streets is back, and New Yorkers are invited to stroll (or bike) up and down Park Avenue, which will not only be closed to moving traffic, but jam packed with countless activities, music and food the whole way through. And if you decide to take this car-free jaunt, be sure to check out Ewerdt Hilgemann’s sparkling sculptures along the pedestrian median.

Once you’ve got your fair share if sunshine, head on over to the AIA NY’s happy hour and mingle with architects and their fans. If art is more your thing, get to know Newark’s public art community and their ideas over drinks at the NeWWalls mixer. And finally, for graffiti art and heady assemblages pay visits to the exhibitions at Tabla Rasa Gallery and Pioneer Works in Red Hook—the latter followed with a wild after party, of course.

More details on all the best events here

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, real estate trends, Starchitecture

cesar pelli, Pelli Clarke Pelli

Growing up just west of the Andes Mountains in the small town of Tucumán in northwest Argentina, Cesar Pelli wasn’t exposed to the vibrant cityscapes that he today helps to shape. He got his start designing low-cost, affordable housing for the Argentine government, which helped him develop an appreciation for each project’s unique sense of place. Breaking from the traditional mold of many world-famous architects, he designed buildings as a response to their neighborhoods, not as a preconceived signature aesthetic.

Now, with a long list of acclaimed international projects to his name, Pelli is lauded for creating structures that honor a city’s history and enrich the local landscape. And here in New York City, home to some of his most celebrated works, the Pelli mark has making an indelible impression on the architecture and real estate fields.

We dive deeper into Cesar Pelli’s past, present, and future

Featured Story

Architecture, Features, History, Morningside Heights, Upper West Side , Urban Design

Morningside Heights Bloomingdale Road NYC, historic morningside heights

Bloomingdale Road (now Broadway) and 114th Street in 1895

Today, it’s hard to imagine Morningside Heights without the flurry of students hurrying to class at Columbia University. It may be even harder to imagine it without some of its signature architecture: the gothic Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the largest cathedral in the world, Riverside Church, with its former bowling alley, or Grant’s Tomb along the Hudson River. But Morningside Heights got an exciting start in the history of New York City (and America, as it turns out)!

The incredible story of Morningside Heights, from past to present, this way

Architecture, Celebrities, Interiors

Gray Organschi Architecture, Jonathan Adler, Simon Doonan, Shelter Island Vacation Home, Crab Creek, colorful interiors, rustic modern

This beautiful Shelter Island vacation home is the place where two of New York City’s most creative minds take a break from it all. We’re  of course talking about interior designer Jonathan Adler and fashion guru Simon Doonan, who with the help of Gray Organschi Architectural Studio created their dream seafront property by mixing rustic and contemporary designs to create a truly stylish aesthetic. Located in a secluded area on Crab Creek, this lush retreat is modernist expression with an explosion of color inside.

Learn more about this celebrity vacation home here

Featured Story

Features, Major Developments, New Developments, real estate trends, Starchitecture

the plaza hotel entrance, the plaza hotel curb

Great neighborhood? Check. Great apartment? Check. Curb appeal?

Killer first impressions can be long lasting — and whether it’s a newly advertised flavor of Ben & Jerry’s, an ad for Tory Burch’s latest shoe collection —or finding new digs, “love at first sight” spot-on marketing moments play a sizeable role in how we make our decisions.

Industry experts note that a large percentage of a house hunter’s decision to explore a property further than the curb is based the project’s “wow” factor. Truth is, it sets the “perception” stage of what’s to come beyond a grand entrance or swanky lobby that was designed to provide a sense of arrival and belonging. Obviously, at the end of the day, a building’s outside will only persuade potential buyers to see more, and first impressions can vary from one individual to the next, but the “I was meant to live here” moment is fairly universal.

How a building’s design tugs at your desire to ‘be someone’

Architecture, Getting Away, Starchitecture

Philip Johnson , Glass House , philip johnson Connecticut houses, Wiley Speculative House, Wiley Development Corporation, plywood homes, 178 Sleepy Hollow Road, Connecticut starchitecture, starchitecture

Philip Johnson is best known for his use of glass, and his iconic Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, is without question his most famous work. But did you know that Johnson also dabbled in plywood construction? In fact, the architect designed several wood homes in the forestlands of Connecticut, including the Wiley Speculative House.

The home was the first (and ultimately, only) of Johnson’s “speculative houses” planned for a large scale residential development headed by the Wiley Development Corporation in 1954. Though built without a hitch, and despite Wiley’s willingness to replicate the home for anyone, anywhere in Connecticut’s Fairfield County, Wiley’s hope for a Johnson-designed development flopped as nobody wanted to pay $45,000 to live in one of the houses. As a result, the Wiley Speculative House saw a somewhat sad fate and remained under the ownership of Wiley’s trust until it was sold off a year later. Since then, the home has changed hands at least nine times, and now nearly 60 years later it’s for grabs again, this time for $1.575 million.

More on the lesser-known Johnson house here

Architecture, Green Design, Hamptons

colorful home, Shelter Island Pavilion, Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion, Stamberg Aferiat, polycarbonate walls, passive house, geothermal energy, Shelter Island

Keeping the plan of Mies van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavilion in mind, New York-based architects Stamberg Aferiat created an eye-catching, colorful home. Built using industrially produced materials and current sustainable principles, the home features seemingly disjointed planes that create the overall geometry of the structure. Located in the island with the same name, the Shelter Island Pavilion is an experiment in color, shape, and sustainability.

Learn more about this striking sustainable home here

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