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City Living

Arthur Avenue Retail Market, Arthur Avenue Bronx, Belmont Bronx, Bronx Little Italy

Photo of the Arthur Avenue Retail Market by Leonard J. DeFrancisci via Wikimedia Commons 

The New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) last week unveiled a new brand strategy for the city’s network of six public markets, which includes a multilingual ad campaign, a dynamic new website and social media presence, direct mail campaigns and more, all of which are designed to consolidate a network of historic markets under one city-wide brand. It’s all part of the organization’s comprehensive initiative to promote NYC’s public markets–including Essex Market, the Bronx’s Arthur Avenue Market, and Williamsburg’s historic Moore Street Market–as “world class destinations for both local residents and tourists.”

See what’s in store

Cool Listings, Sunset Park

4313 9th Avenue, sunset park, borough park, cool listings

We’re told this big and bright pre-war apartment at 1413 9th Avenue is in a 1923 Finnish co-op building. We know that’s not unusual for Sunset Park: In the first half of the 20th century, the neighborhood was home to a large Scandinavian community. But this particular home’s charming interiors are also the picture of Scandi-chic (though we’re pretty sure it’s coincidental). At $560,000, three big bedrooms with plenty of space to spare make the laid-back minimal decor that much easier on the eyes.

Tour this lovely southwest Brooklyn gem

Brooklyn, gentrification, real estate trends

orthodox jews brooklyn

We hear so frequently about the players behind Manhattan’s billion-dollar real estate projects and how foreign investors are pouring a global vault’s worth of currency into New York City property, often shielded by LLCs. It’s illuminating to get a closer look at the city’s larger real estate landscape–one that has changed so much in recent decades–and learn who’s behind the soaring property values, skyrocketing rents, frenzied flipping and veritable horse-trading that has driven the unprecedented and transformative gentrification beyond Manhattan’s rarified development scene.

A recent story by The Real Deal titled “Learning and earning: Hasidic Brooklyn’s real estate machers” reveals that a huge slice of the borough’s real estate pie is owned by the Hasidic community. The ultra-orthodox sect reportedly includes some of Brooklyn’s wealthiest property owners, to the tune of $2.5 billion.

Find out more

Featured Story

Brooklyn, Features, History

Brooklyn, Biggie Smalls, Notorious B.I.G., Brooklyn, Fort Greene, Cafe Habana, Real Estate

The story behind cheese-aging facility Crown Finish Caves in Crown Heights tells of an enormous amount of risk and dedication to making something on a small scale; to doing one thing well. It also once again stirs the hive of buzz around today’s Brooklyn. Article after article raises the idea that Brooklyn’s moment as the new hot spot for excellence in food, culture and authentic, hand-crafted goods, is in some quarters regarded as trite and trendy hype with little substance to it.

For some, the underground cheese caves are just one more example: Cheese caves. How Brooklyn. Thirty feet below street level, in the lagering tunnels of a former brewery beneath the Monti Building in Crown Heights, Benton Brown and Susan Boyle spent several years renovating and creating “Brooklyn’s premier cheese-aging facility” complete with state-of-the-art humidity control and cooling systems. The couple created the 70-foot space with advice from the world’s top cheese experts; Crown Finish Caves opened in 2014. On an article in Cheese Notes, a commenter raves: “If I were a mouse, I would move to Crown Heights.”

More excellence and authenticity this way

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