Greek Revival

Architecture, Design, Interiors

waverly place, Greek Revival, washington square park, MAD

This beautiful Greek revival building, located at the Northwest corner of Washington Square Park, dates all the way back to the 1850s and previously functioned as a multiple family house. However, with new ownership often comes new ideas, and the current owners recently transformed the apartment building into a single-family residence. The renovation was led by the design team at Matiz Architecture & Design (MAD) and included a complete rebuild of the rear exterior, as well the addition of an central elevator providing easy access to all six floors. MAD’s focus during the renovation was to conserve the existing details and restore the building’s exterior while also giving the home an modern update. In addition to the architectural components, MAD was also responsible for all of the interior furnishings.

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Chelsea, Cool Listings, Historic Homes, Interiors

440 West 22nd Street, Samuel Turner House, Michael Minick, Chelsea Seminary District

Okay history buffs, here’s your chance to own the elegant former home of Reverend Dr. Samuel Turner, who was one of the head professors at the nearby General Theological Seminary. He built the house at 440 West 22nd Street in 1836 to match the merchant-class residences popping up in Chelsea around this time, and he lived there until he passed away of typhoid fever in 1861.

When owner Michael Minick purchased the home in 1993, it had been subjected to years of neglect, but Minick lovingly restored it back to its Greek Revival glory, while preserving its turn of the 20th century Queen Anne exterior facelift. It’s now available for the first time in over 20 years for $17,950,000.

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Greenwich Village, Historic Homes, Interiors, Recent Sales

45 West 12th Street, Greenwich Village, Minetta Brook, Alessandra Gambaccini

Fashion director and stylist Alessandra Gambaccini (who goes by Sciascia) purchased her Greenwich Village townhouse at 45 West 12th Street in 1996 for $865,00, and has now sold it for a whopping $4,975,000. But it’s not just the incredible profit Ms. Gambaccini made that makes this historic home stand out–it’s also its unusual triangular shape, the result of having been built in 1846 diagonal to Minetta Brook, since covered over by the city. There are hidden remnants of the old creek all throughout the Village, and this Greek Revival townhouse is definitely one of the most storied.

Sciascia spoke to the Wall Street Journal about her fascinating home and how she was rather intrigued by its unusual shape. The four-bedroom house is also noted for its opulent interior, outfitted with custom-made Italian décor thanks to Milan-based architect and decorator Roberto Gerosa. And if those weren’t enough talking points, the deed to the cobblestone courtyard is said to have once been owned by English royalty, and Frank Lloyd Wright’s sister is a past inhabitant.

Now, let’s check out those interiors

Cool Listings, Interiors, Noho, Quirky Homes

Noho Historic District, 3 Great Jones Street, Jones Alley, Greek Revival townhouse, Noho real estate

The Noho Historic District is one of the most charming in Manhattan, with quaint cobblestone streets and an eclectic mix of historic lofts that once housed the city’s dry goods centers and early-19th-century houses. And one of these quirky buildings is 3 Great Jones Street. The Greek Revival townhouse was erected in 1845, replacing a former stable building. It saw façade alterations in the 1920s, but the entryway to unit R1 still retains all of its old-time appeal, as it’s situated on the side of the building on Jones Alley (formerly known as Shinbone Alley), a private, gated mews. A 14-foot, historic wooden door surrounded by welcoming plants leads to the duplex loft, on the market for $3.7 million.

You don’t want to miss this home

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