David Geffen

Design, lincoln square, Upper West Side 

Looking East; Rendering: DBOX

Nearly two decades after the project was first proposed, the New York Philharmonic’s new state-of-the-art concert hall will open this October, two years ahead of schedule, officials announced Wednesday. The revamped David Geffen Hall aims to create a more intimate space, “a living room for New York City,” as a press release describes, by moving the audience closer to the stage and improving sightlines. Plus, the project fixes the hall’s poor acoustics and reduces the total number of seats by about 500. In addition to announcing the $550 million project was finishing on time, officials also released new renderings of the theater and public space.

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Design, Upper West Side 

david geffen hall, lincoln center, new york philharmonic

Renderings courtesy of the New York Philharmonic and Lincoln Center

A plan to redesign the New York Philharmonic’s concert hall was unveiled on Monday, nearly two decades after the project was first proposed. The $550 million plan aims to create a more intimate experience, acoustically and visually, at David Geffen Hall by moving the stage closer to the audience, improving sightlines, and reducing the seating capacity. Officials estimate the new hall will open in March of 2024.

More here

Midtown, New Developments

Rendering of MoMA renovation Via Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Just this week, it came to light that the Metropolitan Museum of Art may lay off as many as 100 employees as part of efforts to cut its $30 million deficit. As the New York Times previously explored, the struggling state of the Met exemplifies a shift in the art world towards modern and contemporary art. And standing as a true testament to this is MoMA’s current financial status.

The midtown museum has already raised $650 million towards its fundraising campaign, far exceeding the $450 million needed for its planned renovation and addition of three new gallery floors. In addition, they’ll also sell $280 million of tax-exempt bonds “to raise money for the project and refinance debt as borrowing costs drop to the lowest on record,” reports Crain’s.

More details ahead

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