Mapping the growing pressure of residential displacement in NYC

Posted On Wed, October 3, 2018 By

Posted On Wed, October 3, 2018 By In affordable housing, gentrification, maps

While tenant displacement is happening in every New York City borough, the reason behind it differs from neighborhood to neighborhood. An updated, interactive map from the Association for Neighborhood & Housing Development (ANHD) looks at the loss of rent-regulated housing, property sales, construction permits, and evictions across the city’s 763,000 residential properties as a way to determine the risk of residential displacement in every NYC community (h/t Curbed NY).

The Displacement Alert Map (DAP) uses up-to-date information on rent-stabilized units, property sales, and construction permits going back to 2007, and evictions from 2017. On the map, each risk factor is its own layer and properties are color-coded by risk level.

Users can browse a neighborhood and zoom in and out on specific blocks or buildings. Specific buildings can be searched by entering the address. More information pops up about the building with links to documents from the Housing Preservation and Development (HPD), the Department of Buildings, property documents on ACRIS, tax bills, and land use details.

‘Displacement is a complex problem; it looks different in Bushwick than it does in the South Bronx or Chinatown,” Lucy Block of ANHD wrote Tuesday in a blog post. “In Bushwick, rental buildings are smaller and not rent-stabilized; in the South Bronx, most buildings are stabilized but have at-risk preferential rents; and in Chinatown, residents are facing rapid development pressure.”

The map is part of ANHD’s broader Displacement Alert Project, a multi-tool initiative to help New Yorkers visualize displacement. The organization also compiled a Displacement Alert Watch List to see which rent-stabilized buildings are being marketed for sale at a price that seems speculative. This then helps organizers and tenant advocates plan strategies to prevent predatory sales.

Explore the interactive map here.

[Via Curbed NY]

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